The Daily Beast's Scores

  • TV
For 58 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Broadchurch: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Zero Hour: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 44 out of 44
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 44
  3. Negative: 0 out of 44
44 tv reviews
  1. It’s a breathtaking work of immense beauty and a thought-provoking meditation on the nature of crime and punishment, of identity and solitude, of guilt and absolution. It is, quite simply, the best new show of 2013.
  2. A gorgeously realized and emotive thriller.
  3. Judging by the initial installments, it's not only one of the most riveting and provocative series I've seen in the last few years; it's one of the most riveting and provocative series I've ever seen. Period.
  4. It is--and continues to be in Season 4--a total storytelling masterclass.
  5. A perfectly mixed cocktail equally parts menacing and suspenseful, washed down with surprising notes of hilarious satire and pulpy violence, FX’s version of Fargo is most certainly not a pale imitation of the gruesome dark comedy.
  6. Season 4 is just as brilliant as the seasons that preceded it.
  7. Much like with Louie, we’re in uncharted territory with Rectify. Each episode offers up wondrous new surprises, whether it’s a dream sequence, a stunning revelation from a new character, or a sly moment of levity from an unexpected source.
  8. Numerous story strands--Robin’s dark past, the venomous Mitcham and his ne’er-do-well sons, a New Age women’s camp run by the mysterious guru GJ (Holly Hunter)--all coalesce into a taut and provocative thriller about damage, vengeance, and escape.
  9. A beautifully realized and dazzling re-creation of our collective past and a glimpse of the infinite and unknowable.
  10. Southland remains one of the most morally complex and insightful dramas on television today.
  11. The Fall is a top-flight mystery that taps into political tensions in Northern Ireland and the troubling undercurrent of violence against women.
  12. The result is something extraordinary and compelling, a first-rate drama for Showtime.
  13. The Americans is already reinventing itself. Why? Because it has the confidence to know that it's about more than the relationship between two specific characters. Rather it's about the idea of relationships in general, in all their intricacy and weirdness--the secrecy they require, the comfort they create, the confusion they entail, the danger they can unleash. And that never gets old.
  14. The plot itself isn’t particularly complex.... The satire, on the other hand, is exquisite.
  15. It’s better than the breakout first season, even, finally equalizing the wildly--though thrillingly--undulating tones and sprawling cast of characters into a streamlined and balanced, but just as original and bracing, mode of storytelling that makes the 13 episodes more bingeworthy than ever.
  16. In a summer that’s offered new programs that pretty much all sit on the spectrum from “silly, but still curious” (Extant, The Strain) on one end to “just plain silly” (Dating Naked) on the other, Manhattan is the most grown up, worth-watching new series we have.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In other hands, this scenario might have degenerated into a caricature-filled freak show. The fact that it doesn’t is attributable to Soderbergh’s relatively restrained direction and Douglas's and Damon’s intelligently modulated performances.
  17. While Season 3, like the novel on which it is based, takes a little while to get going, when it does pick up speed, it soars--particularly in the sensational third and fourth installments.
  18. The hotly anticipated second season of Girls, which returns to HBO on Sunday, builds on the strengths of its stellar first season and captures the quicksilver magic of Dunham at her best, with the first four episodes supplying a mighty kick to the heart.
  19. The strength of Season 3 is marred somewhat by its relatively lackluster season finale.
  20. Ultimately Baer and Vaughan’s efforts point toward Under the Dome offering an alternately effervescent and tense viewing experience, one that’s perfect for the long, hazy days of summer.
  21. Overall, The Bridge is a taut thriller mystery that is compelling and thought-provoking, much as Broen was.
  22. The Season 3 premiere of Girls is good. It isn’t brilliant and life-changing nor is it terrible trash. It’s not as profound as we force Girls to be, nor is it meaningless. It’s just good. Sometimes it’s very good. It’s certainly enjoyable. But it’s neither the best nor the worst thing ever.
  23. While Episode 1 is a bit of a bore, the second episode is flat-out hilarious.
  24. While House of Cards has always explored both the personal and political sides of life in Washington, D.C., my early sense is that, in Season Two, it’s gotten better at both.
  25. Review is high concept, yes. But it’s also incredibly clever, and really funny.
  26. Lindsay was the most stressful hour of television I’ve ever seen. And I loved every second of it. Credit Winfrey, first, with adding gravitas and objectivity to what is ultimately a blatant and shameless grab for ratings.
  27. Extant is laying some intriguing groundwork and doesn’t shy away from difficult conversations about humanity and artificial intelligence, particularly in John’s heated debate with a board that is considering financing his android work.
  28. The show grows ever more confident each week. As Jimmy and Gretchen grapple with their relationship, their conflicts seem authentic and not contrived.
  29. Red Band Society is by no means the perfect network drama. (That would be The Good Wife, for those who are keeping count.) But there is something admirable about what it is doing, and about the fact that it has no qualms about it.

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