The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

For 4,014 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 China Heavyweight
Lowest review score: 0 Employee of the Month
Score distribution:
4,014 movie reviews
  1. Dull Blade just doesn't cut it.
  2. Both syrupy and scatological, this is a typical family-dividing Sandler comedy: Parents will hate it but the kids will delight in its rudeness.
  3. Candy and Moranis are real talents, but they're completely wasted, like everyone else here, sacrificed to the grade-school inanities of that self-indulgent script. [26 Jun 1987, p.D6]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    If TMNT the franchise is going to reach the same lofty heights of blockbuster-dom, it still needs to find its own inner hero.
  4. While computer games can boast an abundance of nifty graphics and odious villains and plucky protagonists on long journeys, they're invariably a tad wanting in the cinematic essentials -- you know, stuff like plot and characterization and theme.
  5. Some films, like some people, wear their artsy pretensions on their sleeve, and there really isn't much going on beneath – it's just a posturing armband wrapped around a plain arm. Welcome, then, to the emptiness of Mister Lonely, a movie that goes to extraordinary lengths to say ordinary things.
  6. Norbit is pretty much a bad-taste sinkhole.
  7. A lamentably slack and dishonest genre exercise.
  8. It wants to make an important political statement, which might have been dandy if it had anything remotely cogent to say.
  9. About the only fun to be had in the movie is screenwriter Alan McElroy's cartoon spook-speak.
  10. Virtue aside, however, Red Tails is a lousy film. Not wincingly bad, mind you, just mediocre.
  11. If anybody should know how to make a good Lubitsch farce, it’s Bogdanovich. Luckily, he already has: You should just watch his classic What’s Up, Doc? instead.
  12. A lightweight flick about a heavy-duty subject, A Dark Truth plays like a TV movie back in the days when TV wasn't worth watching.
  13. All of this is interesting, but not all that entertaining.
  14. Very little of it works.
  15. Valuable life lessons always come at a steep price, and this one is no exception. Sorry, but you'll have to shell out for The Divide and then suffer through its nearly two hours of bloody inanities. Weigh the balance, make your choice.
  16. [Law] talks straight to the camera like the young Michael Caine, but this time our hunk has got zilch to say. That's because a bastard's candour is off-limits in today's politically correct market — it just wouldn't be polite.
  17. Pretty much what you'd expect -- just another haunted house that happens to float.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    One of Blomkamp’s most unlikely conceits is a machine – apparently standard-issue in all of Elysium’s made-to-order McMansions – that can heal all injuries and infections at the flick of a switch. He could have used one to fix Elysium’s battered and broken screenplay.
  18. By then, the lofty ambitions can't disguise the sad reality - it's long, it's cluttered, and it's trite.
  19. What we have here is a romp, a funny romp at times, with a clear satiric intent and the expected quota of outrageous style - likable enough, yes, but a rather flimsy thing, a zany fest with its mind on cruise control. [17 June 1994]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Anyone who has seen "Dream Girls," "What's Love Got To Do With It?" or even "The Doors" will find themselves in familiar (if inferior) territory here.
  20. Before immediately handing the movie an F and sending it off to summer school, give the filmmakers, and especially co-star Jason Schwartzman, credit for their anarchic willingness to try anything to shock a laugh loose from an audience.
  21. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to make heads or tails of this Byzantine thing. [22 May 1996]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  22. Both cautionary and comforting (yes, some kids today prefer conversation to cybersexting), Men, Women & Children is as anxious to seem contemporary as any after-school special.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Dark Places lacks the gloomy meditative quality that Gone Girl rode to success on, with none of the grace or subtlety necessary in making a convoluted thriller a watchable enterprise.
  23. After a while, it begins to feel like a confused comedy: How to explain to the neighbours that your dead husband has moved back home?
  24. Over on the aliens side, it's hard to make out faces, but there's no doubt about their place of origin: These slimy, growling, bug-eyed and distinctly non-scary things are straight from central casting.
  25. The problems with First Sunday extend well beyond the hokey premise and predictable performances to the fundamentals of script, direction and tone.
  26. The chipper tale is admittedly interesting, though not “fascinating,” as self-advertised.

Top Trailers