The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

For 4,469 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Moonlight
Lowest review score: 0 War Room
Score distribution:
4469 movie reviews
  1. An exercise in competence guaranteed neither to offend the initiated nor to charm anyone else.
  2. Twitchy, messy and uneven, it's an action flick that just won't shut up. The movie is somewhat saved by a smattering of wacky minor characters and humorous bits of non-essential business, but they certainly don't add up to a satisfying experience.
  3. Falls into the category of heart-warming sports yarns, and, if television still made movies-of-the-week, it would enjoy a rightful home.
  4. Watching this is a feature-length exercise in frustration - comedy that promises to be amusingly black stays uniformly grey; sentiment that looks to be credibly bittersweet winds up badly soured. We're constantly tantalized and perpetually disappointed, but don't despair - there's one terrific bonus...Toni Collette.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a complicated story that requires digging deep into uncomfortable questions about ballet’s rigid aesthetic standards and the economics and availability of training. George doesn’t give it the depth or analysis it requires.
  5. It can be accurately described as a loud soundtrack occasionally punctuated by the faint vestige of a plot. Or as a lush travelogue that sometimes gives way to sporadic bursts of chirping dialogue.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s probably accurate in its portrayal of her general good humour. Detractors would be surprised at how genuinely funny she can be.
  6. Clearly, the screenplay is looking for some black comedy here, but Foster's direction is too earnest to locate it.
  7. Sorry, but this level of insight is readily available from daily news reports.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There might be a pretty good film lurking in this latest dramedy from the veteran Scottish directing-writing team of Ken Loach and Paul Laverty. I use the conditional because at least half the dialogue is delivered in a Glaswegian Scots so thick, it might as well have been Urdu.
  8. The plot is stale though some of the moves are fresh.
  9. With your sharper minds, you'll probably figure it out. I hope so. Hope you'll like the movie too. But here's a bit of advice: Don't bet your allowance on it. Make Daddy pay.
  10. With a couple of more drafts to mend the plot holes and restructure the middle act, Awake could have been saved.
  11. Yes, the filmmaker and co-director Duke Johnson laboured for years over this project, and their set design is often astonishing. But that doesn’t mean the film is a masterpiece, or even half a masterpiece.
  12. 3 Days to Kill is a comic variation on the "Taken" movies, which Besson also co-wrote and produced, starring Liam Neeson as a daughter-rescuing spy.
  13. Every scene is perfectly framed, every symbol lovingly shot, but the story and the characters remain opaque.
  14. Zootopia takes the cultural practice of posing animals as human characters to queasy new heights.
  15. The Lost Skeleton also reminds you that real filmmaking -- the illusion of one event following another -- is actually a skill.
  16. It's always rather sad to watch gifted performers stranded in a tepid thriller. You can see them, as professional pretenders, trying to believe that they're creating a character, but the lie is transparent -- all they're really doing is advancing a retarded plot.
  17. No doubt the audiences in the Coliseum would offer a thumbs-up to the scale of the destruction, though even they might have had some quibbles about the special effects, which, too often, resemble a very large pile of melting crayons.
  18. In the shock department, the ante has been upped, way up, and a mere kitchen knife through a shower curtain just doesn't cut it any more.
  19. If this is meant to look fresh while still being sensitive, it doesn't and it isn't.
  20. Though complete redemption of Brown's fiction may not be possible, Howard's new film at least represents an upgrade from a mortal to a venal movie sin.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    So yes, if you’ve seen "The Bible," you’ve already seen most of Son of God – but if there’s one story where spoilers just don’t apply, it’s the Greatest One Ever Told.
  21. Ultimately, his (Silver) film settles for a queasy mix of high-toned intentions and commercial compromises.
  22. Perhaps too much energy was spent on being stylish rather than simply low-rent horrifying. The upshot is not very stylish and not very scary.
  23. A painfully predictable movie.
  24. Instead of a madcap farce, the movie grinds along into a series of laboured comic bits.
  25. There are lively, compelling scenes, particularly in the first hour - Raimi has an indubitable talent for camp mayhem - but the picture escalates into absurdity and the last half hour, essentially a chase sequence, is marred by suprisingly cheesy special effects. [24 Aug. 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a timely narrative subject, but its treatment in The Reluctant Fundamentalist is fundamentally flawed.

Top Trailers