The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

For 3,936 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Wolf of Wall Street
Lowest review score: 0 Godzilla
Score distribution:
3,936 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It might seem, from 2002's "Gerry" to his ersatz Kurt Cobain biopic, "Last Days," that Gus Van Sant has been making the same movie: an enigmatic and poetic paean to (teenaged) male beauty, disaffection and inscrutability.
  1. So delightful it should come with a parental advisory: "Jaded adults, beware. Viewing this may pierce your shell of cynicism and spark a renewed belief in the magic of movie-making."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Do you need to see this film? No. But if you want to see it, you’re in for a treat.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It is also extremely well-written in the fearless way of a smarty pants on a roll in the university cafeteria.
  2. As down-to-earth as a ghost story gets.
  3. Despite a few wrong turns early on, the movie gathers graceful momentum and heads straight to the warm heart of the book - that fond spot located just on the safe side of sentimentality, a feel- good place that doesn't leave any feel-stupid fallout.
  4. Bizarre, indeed.
  5. Modestly clever, this is definitely a little thing. Enjoy.
  6. Skip work to see it at the first opportunity.
  7. May not have the most sophisticated narrative, but it is one of the most spectacular and masterly demonstrations of animation in screen history.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This is the funniest teen movie I've seen in eons.
  8. A little like speeding through the digestive tract of some voracious beast. There's bite, acid, digestive churning and an expulsive conclusion. If the metaphor seems unsavoury, well, wait until you see the film.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Visually evokes Coppola’s "Godfather Part II" and Leone’s "Once Upon a Time in America," but in its utterly irony-free melodramatic sincerity also suggests a silent-era woman’s picture à la D.W. Griffith, King Vidor or G.W. Pabst.
  9. The movie isn't just about Schmidt as a personality, it's a portrait of his world, and Payne and co-writer Taylor show a rare compassion for the superficially comfortable.
  10. In the end, like any satire worth the name, In the Company of Men spins around to fire its biggest salvo at its ultimate target -- the audience.
  11. Though the Disney logo is on this movie, there is -- possibly excepting little Nemo himself -- not a single cloying, sentimental Disneyesque creature in it. There is, instead, wit and flair in concept and writing, the trademark of the Pixar people who drove the project.
  12. The first 20 minutes of the South Korean film The Host represents one of the most entertaining movie openings in memory. It's the same kind of pop-culture thrill provided by Steven Spielberg's "Jaws," with the same sense of astonishment, fear and pleasure at something genuinely new.
  13. The score (a nifty collection of vintage but never clichéd period tunes) complements the mood perfectly, and the ensemble cast members hit their own notes to perfection.
  14. Always perceptive and curiously light in tone if not in content -- such a remarkably delicate look at an absolutely devastating subject.
  15. Pure cinematic intoxication, a wildly inventive mixture of comedy and melodrama, tastelessness and swooning elegance, bodies with the texture of fresh peaches, and angular faces Picasso would have loved.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    What it comes down to is the difference between spectacle and craftsmanship. The Winter Soldier has plenty of the former – every dollar of its estimated $170-million (U.S.) budget is onscreen – but it’s also got an intricate dramatic and thematic structure holding everything in place.
  16. The result is a rarity on any screen: intelligent fun.
  17. This happy daydream contains Coppola's most assured work since "Apocalypse Now;" save for its modesty, it is in no way inferior to his masterpiece, "The Godfather" Saga. [12 Aug 1988]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  18. If the kids give the movie its momentum, its fascination comes from a more static source -- the father.
  19. From the first stylized shot to the final comic resolution, Moonstruck is completely sui generis - hard to describe but easy to love.
  20. No film this year has offered quite the cerebral tickle, weird invention and slaphappy gusto.
  21. It's intriguing, appalling, savvy, nasty, grossly unsettling -- you may not like what you see, but you'll definitely be affected by the sight.
  22. All this is as fascinating as it is humbling, even when Herzog ventures a little too far down eccentricity's back alley.
  23. So energized by the subject that it overflows with inventiveness.
  24. It is our tour guide that makes Cave of Forgotten Dreams an often thrilling experience. His producer, Erik Nelson, has joked Herzog is the first filmmaker to use 3-D for good, instead of evil. There is no question that the technology enhances our visit, giving perspective and shape to the jagged Chauvet Cave – an open mouth the size of a football field.

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