The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

  • Movies
For 3,882 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Maria Full of Grace
Lowest review score: 0 Far and Away
Score distribution:
3,882 movie reviews
  1. Never before has Allen been able to integrate comedy and pathos as deftly as he does in Manhattan. [28 Apr 1979, p. 17]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  2. Hunger -- the disturbing, provocative, brilliant feature debut from British director Steve McQueen -- does for modern film what Caravaggio did to Renaissance painting.
  3. Once you overlook the laborious contrivance of Jerry's background, Down and Out in Beverly Hills is a sharp, sweet comedy of affluent manners. [31 Jan 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  4. Intriguing, disturbing, uplifting evocation. In fact, to watch this film is to engage in participatory art -- for better and for worse, through sickness and in health, we're drawn deeply in.
  5. Le Havre, offers the director's usual humour, pitch-perfect acting and compassionate message, with a Gallic twist that should win new converts.
  6. My Summer of Love may sound like the title of a hot teen flick, but it is a truly refreshing grown-up big-screen film, a rare gem in this summer of duds.
  7. Hackman is unexpectedly hilarious. With protruding top teeth and a professorial beard, he's a motormouth, badgering and abusing one minute, wheedling and fawning the next.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    These are simply incredible performances, captured stunningly on film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Animal House is the sort of film you hate yourself for laughing at. It is so gross and tasteless you feel you should be disgusted but it's hard to be offended by something that is so sidesplittingly funny. [05 Aug 1978]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  8. If the word masterpiece has any use these days, it must apply to the film Once Upon a Time in Anatolia, a mature, philosophically resonant work from Turkey's leading director, 53-year-old Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Climates, Distance, Three Monkeys).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Spare, steely, sexually explicit in a way that transcends mere provocation, Stranger by the Lake is vital cinema.
  9. The reality measures up to the rep.
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  10. From its quiet opening sequence to its silent final shot, everything about A History of Violence is deceptive, and deceptively simple.
  11. The wonder is that the film balances its many genres, from the thorns of murder to the bloom of romance to the thickets of politics, with such easy grace.
  12. Two superb actors etch an unflinching portrait of a young marriage doomed never to grow old.
  13. British humour at its eclectic best, a deliciously heady mix of dry wit and ribald farce.
  14. There's no redemption here. Indeed, if anything is redemptive about Katyn , it's the fact of the film itself.
  15. The triumph of Foxcatcher is not in the subject but in its art. The clear-eyed compassion and moral intelligence of Miller’s film brings sense to the senseless, and finds the human pulse behind the tabloid shock. It’s not a movie to make you feel good, but, at moments, it reminds you what goodness is.
  16. No
    Take the backroom political machinations of "Lincoln," add in the showbiz sleight of hand of "Argo," and you’ll get something like No, a cunning and richly enjoyable combination of high-stakes drama and media satire.
  17. A simultaneously realistic and absurdist examination of police work.
  18. Skyfall is one of the best Bonds in the 50-year history of moviedom's most successful franchise.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Perhaps Jia is trying to prove the point that the future has already arrived. Or perhaps he is suggesting that the truth is stranger than science fiction. This is today's China: Anything is possible.
  19. In the end, like any satire worth the name, In the Company of Men spins around to fire its biggest salvo at its ultimate target -- the audience.
  20. Death, torture, humour and even budding eroticism -- now this is more like it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A refreshing take on vampire lore.
  21. As in "Taxi Driver," the protagonist is a damaged war veteran, an invisible man who travels about the city and internalizes its contradictions until he explodes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The World’s End isn’t perfect – – but its best moments leave the bulk of recent American “event movies” gasping in the dust.
  22. All this is as fascinating as it is humbling, even when Herzog ventures a little too far down eccentricity's back alley.
  23. Scorsese and Schrader have made a courageous film that people of all religions or no religion should be able to watch with identical fascination. [10 Aug 1988. pg. C.4]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  24. This is where the movie excels. In the classic neo-realist tradition, it's scant in plot yet rich in mood and character, offering us a revealing hint here, a poignant glimpse there, with each revelation filtered through Michelle Williams's superbly muted performance, all the more moving for being so restrained.

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