The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

For 4,908 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Edward Scissorhands
Lowest review score: 0 Senseless
Score distribution:
4908 movie reviews
  1. Out of Time is severely out of whack, and the problem isn't hard to locate: It's all that flab in the thriller. It's a suspense flick so pillowy soft that the star gets bumped from the centre of the frame and the comic relief sneaks in to swipe the picture.
  2. What doesn't work so persuasively is Elkoff's script, particularly the overuse of voice-over.
  3. These Stooges-like antics are more about showing what good sports his stars are than honing any real satiric edge.
  4. What remains “indie” about At Any Price is that this is an unabashed social-message film – one that plays out like a cross between the agribusiness exposé "Food, Inc." and Arthur Miller’s "Death of a Salesman."
  5. Too often, the script collapses into what feels like improvisation, in which the characters find a kind of common ground: Infantilism.
  6. Strictly for the midnight-movie crowd, Drive Angry serves up a non-stop stream of female nudity, flying body parts, gun battles and smart-alecky dialogue.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While oil is still synonymous with unmitigated catastrophe, the documentary Gasland warns of the dangers lurking in natural-gas wells.
  7. The film has enough laughs to stock a 90-minute entertainment. Unfortunately it throws out enough material to fill five comedies. And most of the jokes die in silence, throwing off a flop-sweat tsunami that carries away Short's best work.
  8. Has a provocative, ticklish premise – five North England Muslims become suicide bombers, but can't decide who or what to take with them.
  9. Feels like one of those misguided high-school-teacher exercises in making literary history sound contemporary.
  10. As cinematic flops go, nothing falls quite as hard as a failed black comedy.
  11. All in all, Australia is so damnably eager to please that it feels like being pinned down by a giant overfriendly dingo and having your face licked for about three hours: theoretically endearing but, honestly, kind of gross.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For his feature film debut, Brandon Cronenberg has taken the decidedly uneasy route in more ways than one. First of all, Antiviral is a virtual panoply of high wooziness, replete with sweating, shakes, vomiting, rot-infected food and more needles piercing skin than rush hour at a free flu clinic.
  12. The stark direction, the brittle performances, the impoverished setting, the scatological dialogue, everything about the film screams out "Gritty social realism." Everything, that is, except the plot, which shouts "Eye-rolling melodrama."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    One of those stupid movies that are good to relax with.
  13. Essentially a journey from point A to point B, a simple classic plotline on which to hang a collection of set pieces -- some delightful, some wacky, some tediously hackneyed.
  14. The proverbial seems awfully pale here. Fans of Q.T. will find it patently derivative. Fans of Elmore will find it, well, El-less.
  15. The nature of this fantasy is boringly feel-good and aspirational.
  16. An exercise in competence guaranteed neither to offend the initiated nor to charm anyone else.
  17. Twitchy, messy and uneven, it's an action flick that just won't shut up. The movie is somewhat saved by a smattering of wacky minor characters and humorous bits of non-essential business, but they certainly don't add up to a satisfying experience.
  18. Falls into the category of heart-warming sports yarns, and, if television still made movies-of-the-week, it would enjoy a rightful home.
  19. Watching this is a feature-length exercise in frustration - comedy that promises to be amusingly black stays uniformly grey; sentiment that looks to be credibly bittersweet winds up badly soured. We're constantly tantalized and perpetually disappointed, but don't despair - there's one terrific bonus...Toni Collette.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a complicated story that requires digging deep into uncomfortable questions about ballet’s rigid aesthetic standards and the economics and availability of training. George doesn’t give it the depth or analysis it requires.
  20. It can be accurately described as a loud soundtrack occasionally punctuated by the faint vestige of a plot. Or as a lush travelogue that sometimes gives way to sporadic bursts of chirping dialogue.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s probably accurate in its portrayal of her general good humour. Detractors would be surprised at how genuinely funny she can be.
  21. Clearly, the screenplay is looking for some black comedy here, but Foster's direction is too earnest to locate it.
  22. Sorry, but this level of insight is readily available from daily news reports.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There might be a pretty good film lurking in this latest dramedy from the veteran Scottish directing-writing team of Ken Loach and Paul Laverty. I use the conditional because at least half the dialogue is delivered in a Glaswegian Scots so thick, it might as well have been Urdu.
  23. The plot is stale though some of the moves are fresh.
  24. With your sharper minds, you'll probably figure it out. I hope so. Hope you'll like the movie too. But here's a bit of advice: Don't bet your allowance on it. Make Daddy pay.
  25. With a couple of more drafts to mend the plot holes and restructure the middle act, Awake could have been saved.
  26. Yes, the filmmaker and co-director Duke Johnson laboured for years over this project, and their set design is often astonishing. But that doesn’t mean the film is a masterpiece, or even half a masterpiece.
  27. The sequel is often loud, occasionally obnoxious and so consistently convinced of its own awesomeness that it will not, it cannot, stop pointing out everything that makes it so utterly wonderful.
  28. 3 Days to Kill is a comic variation on the "Taken" movies, which Besson also co-wrote and produced, starring Liam Neeson as a daughter-rescuing spy.
  29. Every scene is perfectly framed, every symbol lovingly shot, but the story and the characters remain opaque.
  30. Zootopia takes the cultural practice of posing animals as human characters to queasy new heights.
  31. The Lost Skeleton also reminds you that real filmmaking -- the illusion of one event following another -- is actually a skill.
  32. It's always rather sad to watch gifted performers stranded in a tepid thriller. You can see them, as professional pretenders, trying to believe that they're creating a character, but the lie is transparent -- all they're really doing is advancing a retarded plot.
  33. No doubt the audiences in the Coliseum would offer a thumbs-up to the scale of the destruction, though even they might have had some quibbles about the special effects, which, too often, resemble a very large pile of melting crayons.
  34. In the shock department, the ante has been upped, way up, and a mere kitchen knife through a shower curtain just doesn't cut it any more.
  35. The humour is based entirely on inversion which worked in your cartoons, and even on the TV show, but it's not enough to hold up a movie, even with the helping hand provided by a disembodied hand. [22 Nov 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  36. If this is meant to look fresh while still being sensitive, it doesn't and it isn't.
  37. Though complete redemption of Brown's fiction may not be possible, Howard's new film at least represents an upgrade from a mortal to a venal movie sin.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    So yes, if you’ve seen "The Bible," you’ve already seen most of Son of God – but if there’s one story where spoilers just don’t apply, it’s the Greatest One Ever Told.
  38. Ultimately, his (Silver) film settles for a queasy mix of high-toned intentions and commercial compromises.
  39. Perhaps too much energy was spent on being stylish rather than simply low-rent horrifying. The upshot is not very stylish and not very scary.
  40. A painfully predictable movie.
  41. Instead of a madcap farce, the movie grinds along into a series of laboured comic bits.
  42. There are lively, compelling scenes, particularly in the first hour - Raimi has an indubitable talent for camp mayhem - but the picture escalates into absurdity and the last half hour, essentially a chase sequence, is marred by suprisingly cheesy special effects. [24 Aug. 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a timely narrative subject, but its treatment in The Reluctant Fundamentalist is fundamentally flawed.
  43. Although I haven't read Nights in Rodanthe, I have to assume there is material in the book that would have helped the movie make hearts thud instead of fingers tap.
  44. Like the first movie, Princess Diaries 2 relies primarily on the chemistry and screen appeal of Andrews and Hathaway to elevate the storytelling above the level of mush.
  45. Frozen would get props for a novel plot, except that its storyline appears to be ski-lifted from the "Curb Your Enthusiasm" episode where Larry is stuck on a chairlift with an Orthodox Jewish woman who is terrified of being seen with a man after sunset.
  46. Providing expectations are kept low, there’s some fun to be had in the elaborately preposterous action set-pieces, and especially Jason Patric’s campy performance as the movie’s villain.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Michael Shannon is an overpowering actor, and in The Iceman, the best that he can do is wrestle the movie around him to a stalemate.
  47. The Last Witch Hunter is redeemed through complex visual-effects work that aptly illuminates Goodman’s netherworld. Further, Diesel’s stolid performance is balanced through the supporting star power of Caine – even with criminally limited scenes – and Rose Leslie’s “dream walker,” whose earnestness makes even the world of a macho witch hunter seem entirely plausible.
  48. Remember the final page of Gatsby, a real American tragedy, when the green light beckons us into an ever-receding future? Now that was a mystery. This is, well, Pittsburgh.
  49. Funnier than any movie called Hot Tub Time Machine has a right to be. And how funny is that? Not very, but a little, occasionally – just enough.
  50. From the base-model script to the assembly-line thrills, everything about Hide and Seek is generic except its star.
  51. Most of the personality work in the film is left to Steve Zahn.
  52. Having seen the TV series "Hogan's Heroes," we already know that a German prisoner of war camp can be cartooned; Hart's War goes further as a cartoon that takes itself seriously.
  53. Bolstered by a solid premise, this film starts out impressively enough - it looks to be a worthy character study. But it soon stops dead, wheels spinning badly, and then, hungry for momentum, lurches off in a completely cockeyed direction. [16 Oct 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  54. If nothing else (and there isn't much else), Part III rises above the wholesale clutter of its immediate predecessor, then contents itself with settling into an easy commercial groove. What remains is amiable kid's stuff, as sweetly forgettable as an orange Popsicle on a summer's day. [25 May 1990, p.C4]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  55. Let's start with this certainty: No one but Quentin Tarantino could possibly have made Inglourious Basterds . Now add another: No one but his most ardent fans will be entirely glad that Quentin Tarantino did make Inglourious Basterds .
  56. Despite its trappings, despite its style, Birth is just a tall tale with a short reach.
  57. Adolescent boys will savour My Way's bombast and solemnity. Cringing adult audiences will more likely beat a retreat before final call.
  58. As it exists, Tenacious D in the Pick of Destiny is strictly for the tenaciously devoted.
  59. In terms of psychology, it's an abysmal failure, too real to be symbolic, too symbolic to be realistic. [25 May 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  60. Gruesome enough; what it lacks is a distinctive revolting personality of its own.
  61. The movie feels like something parents want their kids to see. Harold and Kumar wouldn't want anything to do with Beth Cooper or Denis Cooverman. You're probably not going to like them much either.
  62. Overall, Stalingrad is a bizarre concoction, part Putin-era patriotic chest-thumping and part creaky war melodrama, all set in a superbly recreated ruined city.
  63. A try-anything, fitfully amusing muddle that wears its mocking cynicism a bit too proudly.
  64. After seven trips made over four years, the production was about to wrap when the crew, aboard an icebreaker, encountered a polar bear mom and twin cubs that decided to hang around for a week – offering a rare opportunity to film the daily life of these notoriously camera-shy creatures.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Fault is at heart a full-throttle, by-the-numbers tearjerker.
  65. Great cast, too bad about the movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Easily the daffiest movie you've ever seen that also references incestuous role-playing games.
  66. Almost everything about this starring vehicle for Katharine Heigl feels borrowed from some previous romantic comedy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Even as he cuts confusingly between talking heads and time periods, Kastner elides key details that might have given viewers a more complex portrait of both the setting and his anti-hero’s role in the drama.
  67. Alas, Schumacher doesn't ride on the momentum; worse, he's not an action director, and the film grinds to a dead stop every time it tries to speed up.
  68. With its wry tone and mild emotional disturbances, In the Land of Women is less a chick flick than a chick flicker.
  69. Poetic Justice is like that - so much worse than it should have been, and yet, for brief shining moments, so much better than any other 2-star film in sight. [23 July 1993]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  70. Bay has attempted to carefully characterize and humanize each member of the security force, and Krasinski, Dale and Schreiber are largely successful at creating personable fighters.
  71. Though The Stoning of Soraya M.'s heart is in the right place, its head is lost in storm clouds of anger.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a satire on the only true religion of the American South -- football -- The Waterboy is a delight.
  72. This little movie – it's only 83 minutes – seems so determined to if not avoid, then only caress the tropes of slacker films that it commits the worst sin for a comedy: It's boring.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    When Farva sees O'Hagan in civilian wear -- a denim jacket and blue jeans -- he asks his boss, "Where'd you get the Canadian tuxedo?" Such moments may not be as exciting as the sight of Homer Simpson at the CN Tower, but they'll do.
  73. This sappy thing is a two-hour cheat that never plays fair for a nanosecond.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Not only does the 3-D format grant you a front row seat at this Jonas Brothers concert, but it puts sweet, sweaty Joe (he's the cute one) practically in your lap. For most JoBro fans, that alone is worth the price of admission.
  74. A screwball comedy about the abortion issue? First-time writer-director Alexander Payne gives it a college try.
  75. [The soundtrack] manages to serve up new rock, eighties dance music, rap and Barry Manilow -- a combination custom-made to annoy audiences of all ages.
  76. 3D Sex and Zen: Extreme Ecstasy fails to live up to either its promise or title.
  77. This is an adaptation that must have been hard to screw up, yet screwed up it has been. If the movie is far from dreadful, it's even further from the searing experience it could have been.
  78. First a bit about the movie, which really isn't one -- more like a 48-minute press release promoting the glories of NASCAR.
  79. Ultimately, even Lee appears to lose interest, flashing none of his usual visual panache and, at the end, content to forego any considered conclusion for a hunk of lumpy irony.
  80. The larger shell game here is that Edge of Darkness is offered as a political thriller, but with real-world politics removed. What we’re left with is a familiar mechanism for delivering a vicarious, violent, wish-fulfilment fantasy, with Mel in a familiar position, in the driver’s seat, pedal to the metal.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    P.S.'s ending, a cautiously happy conclusion, feels like an afterthought.
  81. If this were funny, The Heat would add up to your average buddy-cop comedy. Except that it’s not funny, at least not very and not often.
  82. If you like your sports movies, especially your football movies, larded with more clichés than a politician's stump speech, Gridiron Gang begs to be seen.
  83. It's the most jumbled and tonally confused movie yet.
  84. Ultimately the ham-fisted Outcast shares less in common with Eastwood’s "American Sniper" than it does with his "Unforgiven" from 1992 and that western’s regretful killers.

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