The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

  • Movies
For 3,768 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 China Heavyweight
Lowest review score: 0 Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd
Score distribution:
3,768 movie reviews
  1. My Summer of Love may sound like the title of a hot teen flick, but it is a truly refreshing grown-up big-screen film, a rare gem in this summer of duds.
  2. Yes
    Ultimately, Potter's fable is about how a catastrophe forces us to ask what we believe and why.
  3. The result is a movie that seems not quite real and yet never false but somehow partakes of both -- rather like the prospect of death.
  4. A movie that gets wonderfully under your skin.
  5. Compelling, disturbing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It is also extremely well-written in the fearless way of a smarty pants on a roll in the university cafeteria.
  6. You may well hate Crash, but if intensity is what you seek in a darkened theatre, you'll hate missing it even more.
  7. Ghoulishness and innocence walk hand-in-hand in Tim Burton's Corpse Bride, a movie that digs into Hollywood's past to resurrect the antique art of stop-motion animation and create a fabulous bauble of a movie.
  8. From its quiet opening sequence to its silent final shot, everything about A History of Violence is deceptive, and deceptively simple.
  9. Beyond the eerily evocative impersonation, Hoffman's brilliance lies in not only playing the shrewd puppet master but also revealing that he too comes with strings attached, the most dominant being his consuming need for acclaim.
  10. If the kids give the movie its momentum, its fascination comes from a more static source -- the father.
  11. The feeling is like a warm homecoming.
  12. In classic B-movie style, The Dark Hours was created in a fever, written in two weeks and hurriedly shot in 16 mm (blown into a crisp 35 mm print). Nevertheless, the film provides evidence of talent everywhere.
  13. Like the stationary figures it portrays, Kicking And Screaming is alive at the edges; it comes with a vibrant border of trenchant asides, tossed-off remarks that blend the solace of protective irony with the sterner stuff of hard truth.
  14. Death, torture, humour and even budding eroticism -- now this is more like it.
  15. Haneke is best known for "The Piano Teacher." His latest, Caché (or Hidden) is a quieter but equally provocative attack. It's less in your face, more in your head and under your skin.
  16. Can a little-read 18th-century literary masterpiece be food-spittingly funny? Can it also include contemporary English actors riffing about their bad teeth, getting drunk and kissing their personal assistants? The answer is yes, as long as you agree that the best way to adapt an original book is with a correspondingly original film.
  17. A meditation on death that has you humming to the melody and laughing at the joke -- it's an elegiac picture that refuses to eulogize.
  18. As provocative as it is timely.
  19. Sensual and scary, the movie is so visually textured you feel as though you're brushing against the screen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A precise, subtle and emotionally affecting portrait of the fraying friendship between two men, director Kelly Reichardt's Old Joy is an increasingly rare sort of American independent film: It aspires to be something other than a Hollywood movie with less money.
  20. Succeeding where most docudramas fail, it turns a slice of recent history into a revealingly intelligent entertainment, without being didactic at one extreme or sentimental at the other.
  21. Another angry, searching document about pedophile priests, Deliver Us from Evil makes for unexpectedly gripping drama.
  22. It's silly, it's serious, it's outrageous, it's mundane, it's blowsy, it's lovely. Yet this fickle film has a constant heart - warm and very likeable.
  23. As down-to-earth as a ghost story gets.
  24. Iraq in Fragments already stands up as a classic war documentary, in its unusual poetic form and by its extraordinary access to the lives of ordinary Iraqis.
  25. A movie that combines the Cold War intrigue of John Le Carré with the wired buzz of Francis Ford Coppola's "The Conversation" -- one of those rare two-hour-plus pictures that runs long but plays bracingly, excitingly short.
  26. The reality measures up to the rep.
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  27. The first 20 minutes of the South Korean film The Host represents one of the most entertaining movie openings in memory. It's the same kind of pop-culture thrill provided by Steven Spielberg's "Jaws," with the same sense of astonishment, fear and pleasure at something genuinely new.
  28. This Hollywood movie about a gay man afflicted with AIDS is evocative, understated and ultimately deeply affecting. Hard-earned tears of truth. [22 Dec 1993, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

Top Trailers