The Guardian's Scores

For 1,642 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Before Midnight
Lowest review score: 20 Baggage Claim
Score distribution:
1642 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ponsoldt elicits remarkably strong performances from his two young leads, who display a depth of feeling that's breathtaking in its simplicity and honest. There's an inherent chemistry here that's both disarming and refreshing.
  1. If it's possible for a picture to be at once ideal and imperfect, then Damsels fits the bill.
  2. In fits and starts, this is a stunning picture. At its best, Winter Sleep shows Ceylan to be as psychologically rigorous, in his way, as Ingmar Bergman before him.
  3. As repellent a figure as many may still find Gibson, I have to report he’s absolutely hit Hacksaw Ridge out of the park.
  4. Danny Boyle’s T2 Trainspotting is everything I could reasonably have hoped for - scary, funny, desperately sad, with many a bold visual flourish.
  5. Raw
    What is very impressive about Raw is that absolutely everything about it is disquieting, not just the obvious moments of revulsion: there is no let up in the ambient background buzz of fear.
  6. If a movie as rich and understanding as Mediterranea suddenly appeared every time we read about a difficult issue in the paper, maybe all of the world’s problems could be solved.
  7. The movie is rich on its own as a character piece about the difficulties of being bi-racial, especially at the very specific location of Columbia University.
  8. Things to Come is a smart, earnest undertaking: an exploration of the insecurity that can hit any of us, at any age, when we start to question the life we’ve built.
  9. When something is this engaging (and funny, did I mention funny?) it ceases to merely be about ideas and becomes, even in this borderline sci-fi context, a thoughtful movie about people.
  10. This is a fluent, confident and deeply felt movie: unmistakably, if not exactly nakedly, autobiographical.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The story of the ingenue who enters the fold and awakens deep feelings is nothing new, but Doremus makes it all utterly captivating. He mines just the right amount of drama and spontaneous comedy from each moment and the foreshadowing is perfectly weighted.
  11. As Jonathan Demme’s concert documentary Justin Timberlake + the Tennessee Kids indisputably shows, Timberlake is only truly in his element when on stage being a showman.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Slightly overlong and convoluted at times, it presents compelling, sexy characters spouting sharp, believable dialogue.
  12. At its best, Malick's cinematic rhapsody is glorious; during his uncertain moments, he appears to be repeating himself. But what delight there is in this film.
  13. Between the kung fu, the gunplay, a gentle romantic subplot and the extreme gastronomy – there's something for everyone.
  14. As for Violet, Emily Blunt brings to the role genuine sympathy, and she continues to thaw out the ice-queen hauteur of her earlier movies.
  15. What shines through most here is the pure sense of pride felt by Vitali, in the trust Kubrick placed in him, and in his part in creating some of the last century’s most monumental pieces of cinema.
  16. This is a tough, muscular, idealistic drama that packs a mighty punch, and Shannon and Garfield are excellent.
  17. What could have been simply bizarre, sentimental or contrived here becomes an utterly absorbing love story.
  18. Laughs emerge from the recognisable micro-horrors found in modern living, which, if the world was run in the way we all agree it should be run, wouldn’t exist.
  19. This director, in the past, has shown herself to be an ace with the teasing, hanging ending and Night Moves saves the best for last.
  20. If the plot’s familiar, no imagination or expense has been spared in mapping the kingdom it winds through.
  21. It’s creative and experimental in just the right spirit, though with an asymmetric flaw. The film is a kind of diptych in which one of the panels is more fully achieved than the other.
  22. Hail, Caesar! is a lot of fun, and beautifully crafted, too. One to savour.
  23. Could Nasheed be the political Prospero to save the island – and the planet? Well, now he is out of power, and the Copenhagen summit was a disappointment. Perhaps his advocacy will help to bring the climate change issue back into political fashion.
  24. Gone Girl, finally, may be no more than a storm in a teacup. But what an elegant, bone-china teacup this is. And what a fearsome force-10 gale we have brewing inside.
  25. The weird oppression and seediness of the times is elegantly captured, and Hoss coolly conveys Barbara's highly strung desperation.
  26. This is a thoroughly engrossing and densely textured drama, showing Farhadi's cool skill in dissecting the Iranian middle classes and the unhappiness of marriage.
  27. What results is an immensely detailed overview of Marley's life and times, from the hillside Jamaican shack where he grew up to the snowy Bavarian clinic where he spent his last weeks in a fruitless attempt to cure the cancer that killed him in 1981, aged 36.

Top Trailers