The Guardian's Scores

For 4,150 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Morph The Cat
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
4150 music reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As Start Together proves, that was never a question anyone would need to ask Sleater-Kinney [“Where’s the ‘fuck you’?”].
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    In spring 1967, Dylan and the Band were out of step, but ahead of the curve. Now, 47 years on, even the listener overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of what’s on offer here--who doesn’t want to hear the false starts and fragments and gags--might conclude that the highlights are as timeless as rock music in the 60s got.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Lost on the River recalls the spontaneity and sheer love of music-making of the original, but it’s not hamstrung by reverence or caution.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    More than most noise albums, or deliberately confrontational music, this is a record that unsettles and subverts.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s revelatory to hear this most intense of bands playing with such ease and fluency, and utterly compelling.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Striking an exquisite balance between brute force, insistent melody and bold experimentation, this is the finest mainstream metal album of 2014 by a huge margin.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Indulgent and trippy and sometimes off-kilter--but a whole heap of fun.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The touchstones here, such as Dusty in Memphis, are all records that revel in a particular kind of musicality, yet this is a record that never feels retro, just timeless.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Untrained ears might shrivel in terror, but those who appreciate the joy of noise will recognise the sound of veteran masters on unassailable form.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Shadows in the Night works as an unalloyed pleasure, rather than a research project. It may be the most straightforwardly enjoyable album Dylan’s made since Time Out of Mind.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For all the layers of irony on I Love You, Honeybear, the biggest irony of all might be that such an ostensibly knotty and confusing album’s real strength lies in something as prosaic and transparent as its author’s ability to write a beautiful melody.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s both appealingly direct yet perfectly thought-through.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s an album that actually deserves a monolith of a box, and one whose title was supremely well chosen. Physical Graffiti is the sound of a group writing their identity, in huge block capitals of sound, across popular culture.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is a smart, soulful and immersive work of art.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Orchestral textures, such as the eerie woodwind motifs of Moth and austere strings of Lamplight, conjure the darkly sexual charge of the film.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Gentle, subtle, poignant, Barnett is almost crooning as she talks disappointment and expectation, and she has a photographer’s eye for detail when it comes to the otherwise mundane.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The most emotional songs are bravely straightforward but quite unexpected.... Surely one of the albums of the year.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Carrie & Lowell is a delight in every way, surely one of the albums of the year.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s remarkable for its power, freshness and range.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s strange and disorientating, idiosyncratic and frequently astonishing, a modern-day psychedelia that owes almost nothing to that genre’s hackneyed conventions and never forgets to temper the sublimity with darkness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s another uncategorisable and understated triumph.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    More impressive still is how good at marshalling his ideas Doyle seems to be--for all that you’re never quite certain what Culture of Volume is going to do next, it never sounds ragged or incoherent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    They manage the rare feat of melding pop and politics into a potent mix, and continue a tradition--begun by the likes of Smith & Mighty, Tricky and Massive Attack--of reinterpreting pop, hip-hop and soul through the filter of black British life.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It amounts to Stornoway’s best work yet: big music, which deserves the largest stage.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s a great album to listen to on headphones--the level of detail and the clarity of the aesthetic choices really become apparent.... It’s bliss.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Weller’s renaissance has not come at the expense of his musical identity. The sunshine-pop haze of Phoenix is from the Tame Impala playbook, but you could imagine Style Council-era Weller singing it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As with a lot of From Kinshasa, listening to it feels like arriving in a bustling, unfamiliar city, a very long way from home: a gripping mix of excitement, apprehension and sensory overload.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Young is still a force to be reckoned with. There is urgency and energy here.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Like all great psychedelic music, it perfectly evokes a deeply weird altered state, albeit that of a head wrecked by grief rather than lysergic acid diethylamide.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    From the rock opera crescendos of the opening Node onwards, the album dares to be both a quintessentially prog-rock experience and a timely act of modern metal derring-do. Frontman Tommy Rogers’ effortless versatility has at last found songs worthy of his gifts.