The Guardian's Scores

For 4,438 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Fever Ray
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
4438 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are sturdy melodies on the quietly charming Cosoco or Cálculos Y Oráculos, but even an apparently conventional song is soon transformed by her edgy and intriguing off-kilter soundscapes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ingenuity in spades.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Accessible but still absolutely out there, this is prog, but not as we know it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shoegaze is rarely affiliated with overwrought emotion, and yet it’s difficult not to feel moved by the expanse of the group’s oceanic comeback.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He strays further still from country’s core sound, replacing the pedal steel and banjo with flutes, saxophones and acoustic guitar. By doing this, and choosing deep cuts rather than hits like Okie From Muskegee, he universalises a music that is still overlooked by many listeners, and in some cases arguably improves it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The 71-year-old singer’s tales of youthful “racing down the Bowery” are wonderfully evocative, as Blondie rediscover their Midas touch.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Their meat-and-two-veg indie is still enjoyable: managing to balance satisfying guitar distortion with all-together-now euphoria (Bless This Acid House), whilst nailing scraggy Sgt Pepper vibes (Put Your Life on It).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This melancholic approach--serious themes, stoned demeanour--seems a smart way to reposition himself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In places the production lacks the spark that Ross Robinson brought to Relationship of Command, but nonetheless, Inter Alia is a blistering return to form.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If No Shape is a less straightforward pop album than it first appears, then something similar is true of the lyrics. It certainly maps out a more positive emotional territory than its predecessors.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As with such completist compilations there’s a fair chunk of filler here, and over time its 21 songs begin to congeal into each other a shade, but as an introduction to the band’s many charms, it’s solid enough.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As a collection, What’s Now is peppy, confident and a little scathing but, like its title, it feels slightly too open-ended to make a real splash.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An album that is not particularly consistent in sound or even sentiment--the worthiness of Easy Target is matched with half-of-the-title track Sad Clowns, a patronising and crankily retro missive on chivalry.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bleak or bleakly funny, Lanegan is in the form of his career.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If only she had skipped the sub-Beyoncé jam, the Get Lucky-style one and the Rihanna-ish trap track featuring meme makers DJ Khaled, Migos and Missy Elliott. Beyond those fairly obvious pop bids, the empowerment ballads are pleasingly understated.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The ideas are still coming in such abundance, it seems to occasionally prove a struggle to marshal them. There are substantially worse problems for an artist to have than that.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She doesn’t do anything to stamp her identity on the songs: good as they are, you’re struck by the sense you could be listening to anyone. It’s one problem that all the expensive names in the credits can’t solve, a single glaring imperfection in an album of otherwise perfect pop.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    8
    Brandon Boyd and boys’ eighth album continues a progression away from the breakdowns and record-scratches of their early years and towards something closer to stadium-baiting modern rock in the mould of, say, Train. Indeed, there’s even the faint whiff of the Sheeran on a few of the big ballads here.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The general mood, though, is one of an Alan Partridge-presented country happy hour, unsuitable all of the day and all of the night.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are no sonic fireworks here, nor bold, ear-grabbing melodies. Rather, the 53-year-old trades in elegant songcraft and romantic ruminations, completely out of step with modern trends.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    High points include Lytle’s impossibly lovely Failing at Feeling, which conjures John Lennon’s #9 Dream; Restart, whose glam-rock crunch is reached via Tame Impala’s Elephant; the arch stylings of Kapranos on Hey Banana; and Real Love, a gorgeous cascade of harmonies and trumpets.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Love Will Save the Day is touching, not trite, and if there isn’t an obvious smash in the mould of All I Wanna Do or If It Makes You Happy, Be Myself certainly punches its weight in sass.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Home and Lose Your Love are pleasant, if earthbound, disco-house tracks bolstered by cut-and-shut samples of Brainstorm’s We’re on Our Way Home and the Emotions’ I Don’t Wanna Lose Your Love. But Truth Is Light is UK garage on non-alcoholic cava, and the dance tracks, with their interminable cosmic arpeggiation, have less poke than a 1980s hand-dryer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When the south Londoner mimics the new age of rap convincingly: Something Special is back-to-basics grime; If You Know embraces the groggy R&B-trap of Drake. But it’s when he moves more brazenly into pop proper that Tempah really shines.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    AZD
    The contents of AZD are strong enough to stand up on their own, whatever you make of the accompanying screeds.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Whether Damn will have the same epochal impact as To Pimp a Butterfly remains to be seen, but either way it sounds like the work of a supremely confident artist at the top of his game.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A certain tolerance for Moore’s loopier sound experiments and slam poetry skits may be required here, but for the most part this is an appealing mix of strangeness and sheen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all of its escapist ambition, Season High’s genre-hopping feels more like a showcase for Little Dragon’s pop competence than the sound of a group swept up in instinctive creativity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His first album for five years is still a folk record at heart, but one swathed in electronic orchestrations.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nostalgia for noughties and Britpop guitar hits echoes throughout--but played by a gang of twentysomethings, its wide-eyed conviction amplifies the emotional carnage.