The Guardian's Scores

  • Music
For 3,228 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Noble Beast
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
3,228 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Without a Net is free to bursting point, but it's a triumph.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This album shows Wilson to be one of modern rock's most cunning and soulful protagonists.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A genuinely remarkable album: self-obsessed but completely compelling, profoundly discomforting but beautiful, lost in its own fathomless personal misery, but warm, funny and wise. It shouldn't work, but it does.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Stornoway make unconvincing space rockers--but that's the only caveat about a triumphantly expansive album.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It succeeds because of the sheer quality of her singing and the thoughtful, varied songs from the light and then furious Kouma to Mélancholie, a highly personal reflection on sadness and solitude.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's the subtlety, and the self-awareness, that make this album exquisite.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    I don't expect to hear a better album this year.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Run the Jewels is remarkably fun.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is knockabout punchline rap made into high art, a psychedelic visionquest to the taqueria on a skateboard.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    He wanted change but loved America, as shown by this remarkable box set of material recorded for the US government.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The jokes, in places offensive, are relentless and ribald. There is no apology, though, no concession; just a considered, virtuoso application of talent.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Satanist is as untamed and direct as its title suggests: a flawless paean to free will and the human spirit.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    St Vincent's 40 minutes offer an embarrassment of fantastic songs.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This new album contains 10 sublime reflections on religious sites and buildings.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Rochford's creative mix makes the album seem like an integrated, large-scale work, and the overall effect is eerily beautiful.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Saxophones are smokin' and guitars twang, making Hot Dreams sound like the soundtrack to a western directed by David Lynch.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Its songs are not weighed down by the Evans concept, and are hugely enjoyable on their own merits.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A darker and more eccentric record than its predecessors, Distant Satellites may not be the album to change all that, but it's still another masterclass in supercharged emotional songwriting and fearless sonic curiosity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Postpunk, hardcore, krautrock and odd, spacey lounge-jazz are all sucked up and bent brilliantly out of shape over the course of an album that's abrasive but accessible, awkward but assured. Properly special stuff.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    In truth, the songwriting quality never really dips. Almost sickeningly overburdened with fantastic tunes, Trouble in Paradise may well be not just a triumph against the odds, but the best pop album we'll hear this year.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A patchwork of catholic musical influences stitched tightly together by one man's peculiar, expansive vision of pop: Soul Mining is a brilliant and very idiosyncratic album.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is an admirably coherent collection of songs that are as uncompromisingly intricate and strange as they are incisively melodic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Everything Changes and the agonised We Watch You Slip Away (written with Kate St John) are among the finest new songs I have heard his year.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Each track, often on the theme of soured love, has a simplicity and a directness that is characteristic of the best pop.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Some Waller devotees will recoil, but this is a respectful tribute from a remarkable modern-music mind.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is rich, strange, endlessly fascinating music: a subtle, beautiful triumph.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As each song merges into the next, as one style succeeds another, the sensation is that of being in a dream.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Here are 12 succinct, speedy, riff-happy gems smothered in snarling backtalk and shameless, glorious guitar solos.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Soused is surprisingly melodic, Sunn O))) provide a menacing but rich backdrop to Walker’s distinctive baritone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Every arrangement is perfect for the melody, and every melody sticks: the cardboard-box drum machine, walking bassline, cheap keyboard and simple guitar arpeggio of Riverside would be nothing individually; together they’re perfect.