The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,272 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 What Doesn't Kill You
Lowest review score: 0 InAPPropriate Comedy
Score distribution:
6,272 movie reviews
  1. Atom Egoyan has delivered a big, slick and sexy mystery in Where the Truth Lies, turning the Rupert Holmes novel into a sumptuous tale of show business hype and duplicity.
  2. This is an art film in spades.
  3. James has done a wonderful job of telling a colorful life story.
  4. Most of all, Earhart wanted to be able to fly free as a bird above the clouds, and director Nair and star Swank make her quest not only understandable but truly impressive.
  5. Because Cutie and Boxer resists easy sentimentality, its view of life and love is all the more powerful.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mike Leigh has come up with a profound yet simple drama of family life generously leavened with comedy. [14 Oct. 1991]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  6. The formula of ingredients is familiar and time-tested, to be sure, but some cocktails go down much better than others and McQuarrie and company have gotten theirs just right here.
  7. Audiences will eat it up: This is a postmillennial spy-action movie pitched to a large international audience. You hardly need subtitles.
  8. What sets Code Black apart is that the filmmaker is himself a physician. His extraordinary access to life-and-death moments and his illuminating perspective on the medical system make for a powerful viewing experience.
  9. A tough-minded, bracingly blunt look at the sometimes debilitating cost of doing business that casts an unblinking eye on the physical, emotional and moral bottom line.
  10. Haneke echoes the theme of Hitchcock's "Rear Window": Moviemaking is basically an act of voyeurism. We secretly examine people's lives in every movie. But in this one, there is a hidden camera, a movie within the movie as it were, forcing us to observe a character along side a mysterious stranger.
  11. The devastating effects of head injuries in sports are detailed in Steve James' wrenching documentary.
  12. Sad and disturbing, this smartly and conscientiously crafted film is a powerful wake-up call, heard but not yet implemented, by the “civilized” world.
  13. A brilliantly honed tale of dementia, starring a skeletal Christian Bale as a tormented insomniac wasting away and terrorized by his irreal existence.
  14. In a summer of remakes, reboots and sequels comes Inception, easily the most original movie idea in ages.
  15. The main performances are powerful, the visuals are bold and vivid, the final effect one of the gut having been punched and the mind stirred.
  16. Striking an elegantly sustained balance between intimacy and historical scope, director James Kent's WWI-set epic Testament of Youth encompasses nearly all of the virtues of classical British period drama and nearly none of the vices.
  17. The director mixes moods with a playfulness that is both brazen and carefree and yet precisely modulated, yielding results that amplify the specific content of the screenplay. This makes for a film that, however cheap it was to make, is incredibly rich to watch.
  18. Marley is sure to become the definitive documentary on the much beloved king of reggae.
  19. At once a powerful psychological thriller and a haunting allegory, The Return marks an auspicious feature debut for helmer Andrey Zvyagintsev.
  20. Depictions of custody battles have become a cinematic staple, but few register with the heartfelt emotion of Any Day Now.
  21. Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky's final film about the West Memphis Three demonstrates how the first two docs played a role in galvanizing national support to free the wrongly convicted men.
  22. Thrillers don't get much smarter than The Interpreter.
  23. Superbly conveys its themes of despair and lost opportunities.
  24. The result is a film both poetic and profound.
  25. It's a long movie that feels short: It grabs you in early scenes, intense though low-key before all hell breaks loose, then keeps you riveted to its mostly male characters.
  26. The filmmakers were right to believe that a live-action version of this story would have failed to achieve the universality Persepolis does.
  27. Even a klutz could hardly make a bad movie about these compelling figures. Thankfully though, Guido Santi and Tina Mascara are superb filmmakers, fully alive in their terrific film Chris & Don: A Love Story to all the undercurrents of art, social class, sexual orientation, challenging relationships and, most especially, the touching love story at the heart of their film.
  28. The last couple of years in one tragically truncated life are chronicled with a winning combination of sensitivity and humor in I Am Breathing.
  29. No matter one's personal stance about what Snowden did, this revelatory work is fascinating and thought-provoking, if, at the same time, oddly lacking in tension; unlike the provocations of Michael Moore or Oliver Stone, the temperature of this film is very cool.

Top Trailers