The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,386 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Rent
Lowest review score: 0 I Know Who Killed Me
Score distribution:
5,386 movie reviews
  1. This version is unlikely to strike a similar chord with young audiences while severely disappointing older fans of the original.
  2. A very sympathetic turn by Colm Meaney both lends box-office appeal and helps Byrne pull back from the saccharine possibilities inherent in the premise.
  3. Unfortunately, the Collector simply isn't a very interesting screen villain. Clad in a black mask that reveals only his eyes and mouth, he mainly communicates by heavy breathing. It makes one yearn for the perversely witty chatter of Jigsaw.
  4. The romantic dilemmas suffered by these twentysomethings may be universal, but their naive attempts to address them are hard to buy.
  5. While the idea of a German romantic comedy may seem like an oxymoron, What a Man proves an amiable diversion that at least has the distinction of not starring Katherine Heigl or Kate Hudson.
  6. There is surprisingly little emotional resonance with the well-drawn and acted characters, making it a tiring two and a half hour trek for filmgoers who don't have a stake in the history it recounts.
  7. It's problematic, however, that we learn very little here that wasn't more stirringly conveyed in the earlier film. In its mesmerizing, propulsive drive, "Tarnation" was a heartfelt scramble to make sense of messy lives. Walk Away Renee is an occasionally illuminating patchwork.
  8. Remakes of '80s-era cult-favorite horror flicks seem to be all the rage these days. But they have to be better than this formulaic effort to replace the already not-so-great originals.
  9. Heartfelt but clumsy.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Out-of-date animation throws up a roadblock for this Indian animated 3D family film.
  10. Short on both romance and humor.
  11. Sincere performances and well-intentioned scripting should help it with vets eager to see their stories told on-screen, but the film's dreary, secondhand feel is hard to overcome.
  12. As the enduring success of this property has shown, there are large, emotionally susceptible segments of the population ready to swallow this sort of thing, but that doesn't mean it's good.
  13. A creakily old-fashioned comedy that forgot to pack the laughs along with the nudging and kvetching.
  14. Billy Crystal and Bette Midler hustle to peddle the threadbare material that makes Andy Fickman's comedy a perfectly tolerable, if uninspired, moviegoing experience.
  15. As is often the case with directors who adapt their own life-histories, there's the sense that a little too close to his material.
  16. A supernatural action comedy that can never live up to its exciting opening scenes, Don Coscarelli's John Dies at the End mixes horror-tinged mayhem with smart-alec laughs but loses momentum early and gets bogged down in exposition.
  17. LUV
    Even if some of them are playing hackneyed gangster-film types, the strength of the actors makes it almost possible to forgive the formulaic plotting and artificially movie-ish developments. Candis and Justin Wilson's screenplay stretches credibility thinner and thinner as the story advances.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What Vishal Bhardwaj's Indian comedy brings in star power, it lacks in humor.
  18. Would have made for a fine film noir 60 years ago but feels rather contrived and unbelievable in the setting of contemporary New York.
  19. The film's failure to raise the temperature gradually leaves viewers less involved than we should be.
  20. Actually offers some decent scares before descending into typical horror film bombast.
  21. In trying to merge this alarmist theme with an old-fashioned murder mystery, the filmmakers throw at least one plot-twist sucker-punch too many, leaving the viewer with an “Oh, come on” reaction to the entire film.
  22. With Melissa McCarthy playing a one-woman demolition team who, for 95 percent of the running time, is a genuine affront to nature, there are unavoidably some laughs here, although the gifted comic actor got more of them in less screen time in her previous films than she does in this starring role.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Visually, the film is skin and bones. Iscove and cinematographer Francis Kenny ("A Night at the Roxbury") have the most fun with "Grease"-like dance numbers in the finale. [27 January 1999]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  23. Nicely cast and made with as much conviction as can be brought to something so intrinsically formulaic.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A distinguished and able cast headed by Jeremy Irons; beautiful, mostly black-and-white cinematography; and the enchanting Prague backgrounds make for a diverting feature-length eyeful and earful, but the reconstruction of the Kafkaesque worldview never quite takes. [3 Dec. 1991]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  24. A thriller element that has not been present in earlier Sparks movies is designed to draw reluctant male viewers to see the picture, but they won’t respond with the same enthusiasm as his core audience of woozy romantics.
  25. A curiosity telling the President's story through the eyes of longtime friend Ward Hill Lamon, it's of interest only to serious history-hounds and techies curious about its unusual green-screen production.
  26. The picture has enough entertainment value to tickle its target audience and even offers a few chuckles for accompanying adults. A strong cast and bright -- if uninspired — animation help to offset a thin story.

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