The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,320 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Wrinkles
Lowest review score: 0 Beyond Honor
Score distribution:
5,320 movie reviews
  1. It is a tremendous achievement that shines a light on the way many countries use criminals to further their domestic and international goals. Politically informative, it also offers great drama with excitement and suspense, and no little tragedy.
  2. All of the key creative personnel contribute to the movie's nail-biting tension and unexpectedly moving finale. Jon Harris's editing is matchless, and Rahman's score effectively heightens the emotion. Ultimately, however, it is the talents of Boyle and Franco that sock this movie home.
  3. A fiendishly entertaining Christmas yarn rooted in Northern European legend and lore, complete with a not-so-jolly old St. Nick informed more by the Brothers Grimm than Norman Rockwell.
  4. The best blue collar action movie in who knows how long, this tense, narrowly focused thriller about a runaway freight train has a lean and pure simplicity to it that is satisfying in and of itself.
  5. Biutiful has a strong, linear narrative drive. Nevertheless, and most of all, it's a gorgeous, melancholy tone poem about love, fatherhood and guilt.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Chen's direction is his most staid yet, but the riveting story speaks for itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Most exceptional is the visual style, which makes even the best animated 3D look like a poor cousin.
  6. The cinematography and editing are as superb as the film's feline stars are photogenic and heroic.
  7. Although the film runs more than two hours, the story is so compelling and the production so beautifully controlled that we are gripped by the characters' quest right up to the shocking end of the story.
  8. To call this movie fascinating is akin to calling the Grand Canyon large.
  9. Darius Khondji's cinematography evokes to the hilt the gorgeously inviting Paris of so many people's imaginations (while conveniently ignoring the rest), and the film has the concision and snappy pace of Allen's best work.
  10. Brandishing an ambition it's likely no film, including this one, could entirely fulfill, The Tree of Life is nonetheless a singular work, an impressionistic metaphysical inquiry into mankind's place in the grand scheme of things that releases waves of insights amid its narrative imprecisions.
  11. It all moves along briskly, with a degree of visual grace and a solid feel for 3D.
  12. All the movie's playfulness rubs off on the actors. Scenes crackle with life. The chemistry among all the actors is terrific.
  13. The best science fiction tells stories about people in extraordinary environments or situations that serve to open up the vast, still largely unexplored terrain of the human heart. Mike Cahill's Another Earth is science fiction at its best.
  14. The movie gathers momentum with a steady, assured pace, accumulating incidents, characters, secrets and lies until the rush of events is absolutely transfixing. Cinema can sometimes rival the novel in compulsive intensity and Sarah's Key is one such example.
  15. A handsome and achingly sad period piece, a finely observed portrait of cast-aside dreams. The drama is quieter and more chaste than the similarly themed "Camille Claudel," but no less haunting.
  16. It's a long movie that feels short: It grabs you in early scenes, intense though low-key before all hell breaks loose, then keeps you riveted to its mostly male characters.
  17. Director David Weissman brings a rewardingly fresh and personal perspective to the subject.
  18. An eloquently shot and closely observed documentary about a poor family in modern-day Indonesia.
  19. A riveting genre blend of thriller, domestic drama and supernatural horror propelled by a brilliant lead performance.
  20. Being Elmo is a rare documentary that will connect across generations and cultures to delight viewers worldwide for years to come.
  21. Leave it to the folks who brought us "Wallace & Gromit," "Chicken Run" and "Flushed Away" to bring a delightful blast of fresh air to the conventional Christmas genre. Aardman's Arthur Christmas is that and more - an endlessly amusing 3D, CG-animated Yuletide romp with lively innovation at every turn and a dream voice cast headed by James McAvoy, Hugh Laurie and Bill Nighy.
  22. Artist evinces unlimited love for the look and ethos of the 1920s as well for the style of the movies. The filmmakers clearly did their homework and took great pleasure in doing so, an enjoyment that is passed along in ample doses to any viewer game for their nifty little conceit.
  23. As in all the director's work, the cast is given top consideration and their realistic acting results in unusual depth of characterization.
  24. Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky's final film about the West Memphis Three demonstrates how the first two docs played a role in galvanizing national support to free the wrongly convicted men.
  25. Danfung Dennis presents a powerful depiction of the horrors and daily violence of our ongoing war in Afghanistan.
  26. The actor literally takes the metaphors of his bull-headed character to the limits and is never less than believable or mesmerizing.
  27. Kindness is evident in even the most hurt or exasperated moments of de France's lovely performance as Samantha. But then, kindness couched in unblinking social realism is an intrinsic part of how these supremely gifted filmmakers view the world.
  28. Marley is sure to become the definitive documentary on the much beloved king of reggae.

Top Trailers