The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,383 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 WALL-E
Lowest review score: 0 What Love Is
Score distribution:
5,383 movie reviews
  1. Admittedly, The Jacket is not likely to be everyone's cup of tea, but filmmaker John Maybury has forged a mesmerizing mindblower.
  2. Straining mightily for a mythic quality and reaching a predictably melancholic, violent conclusion, Road to Paloma mainly comes across as a vanity project star vehicle.
  3. Director Patrick Lussier and his co-screenwriter Todd Farmer string together smash-up car chases, hyper-violent physical clashes, flying viscera and a dollop of sex and nudity with ludicrous dialogue and only a passing concern for logic in this high-octane trash.
  4. Gratingly unfunny groaner littered with zero-dimensional, unlikable characters and hackneyed, threadbare comic setups.
  5. The charisma and hard work by his two leads allows Boorman to succeed beyond all expectations.
  6. Once again, the three young leads give committed performances, with Lautner's character allowed a larger share of the spotlight this time around.
  7. An amusing premise yields few yuks.
  8. As the central character in this musical melodrama about step dancing in black fraternities, Short displays an uncanny dramatic sensibility to go with the eye-catching athleticism of his dance moves.
  9. The biggest hole in this picture is not so much whether an audience will buy its miracles but whether an audience will care about Henry Poole. Wilson hits the same notes in virtually every scene without any change to his physical rhythms or moods.
  10. Ruffalo gives voice to the film's unironic point of view.
  11. The greatest romantic movie to jumble its time structure, Stanley Donen's "Two for the Road," is a touchstone that DiPietro must have had in mind. While this low-budget indie doesn't have the gloss or the depth of that romantic classic, the highest compliment I can pay Peter and Vandy is that it belongs in the same company.
  12. The script is not without some perceptive observations about family dynamics, but the problematic tone keeps getting in the way. A little absurdist levity in these instances always helps to prevent things from becoming too maudlin, but in Stockman's hands, the played-for-laughs elements in this tragicomedy feel forced rather than organic, ultimately creating an emotional disconnect with the viewer.
  13. Earns its R but may leave audiences wanting more.
  14. If Hostage looks a lot like a state-of-the-art French "policier" minus the pesky subtitles, the effect is purely intentional.
  15. Pantoliano brings his usual degree of wily, understated humor to his role and is ably supported by the terrific ensemble, but he's unable to elevate a film that is ultimately as directionless as its protagonist.
  16. A ramshackle but likeable story.
  17. The cast acquits itself well, with the Rock evincing a quiet balance between humor and brawn.
  18. It would be hard to find two more contrasting actresses than Otto and Pires, but Barreto plays off their differences in culture and personality.
  19. This nastily efficient horror film delivers genuine chills.
  20. It's overblown and extravagant business as usual.
  21. This dour, uninspired, Hispanic-themed variation on the profitable "Step Up" dance movies is unlikely to similarly rouse teens.
  22. The film’s attempt at blending humor, poignancy and melodrama results in an awkward mish-mosh. But it has heart to spare, and the performances by the multi-generational ensemble are very effective, with particularly moving work by the veterans in the cast.
  23. Proves lightly entertaining in spite of its more heartfelt tendencies.
  24. Stripped for action without a moment wasted on unnecessary dialogue, exposition or nuances.
  25. A Spanish-language black comedy with a frenetic style that plays out like regurgitated Tarantino and Guy Ritchie.
  26. The director's split-screen effects and hand-held digital camerawork go from being innovative to repetitive to irritating in a Santa Cruz minute.
  27. Perhaps the best way to appreciate the picture, its few intellectual pretensions notwithstanding, is as a classy horror film with a particularly nasty edge. It's not exactly entertainment, but it casts a poisonous spell.
  28. In the end, the gimmick is too risible and its effects on the characters too forced to sustain either suspense or horror.
  29. Motivated by an earnest need to inspire, Schmidt's debut suffers from stiffness but improves as it goes, the tension of its plot overcoming many dramatic failings.
  30. Fortunately, the two stars always brighten the proceedings.

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