The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,521 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Frozen Planet: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Dads: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 812
  2. Negative: 0 out of 812
812 tv reviews
  1. It constantly offers more than you expect, and even when it delivers something either predictable or straight from the “women’s prison drama” handbook, it then counters with something fresh or unexpected.
  2. Not only is the pilot a wonderful mix of hilarious moments (pretty much any time Faxon is in the picture) and subtle sentiment, but it's one of those shows where the acumen of the off-camera talent (Fox) is impressive and clear, which gives hope for long-term success.
  3. Gomorrah is dark--both in tone and how it was shot--and it requires concentration on the subtitles, but it's also completely riveting and worth the effort as Italy steps up, via Sundance TV, to prove we don't have a lock on quality dramas.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a wonderful, subversive concept, and by failing to romanticize the players, "Office" remains true to its ghastly, funny self. [23 Jan 2003]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  4. Far from devolving into soapy Madison Avenue pablum, Mad Men is painstakingly building its way to genuine greatness.
  5. It's an absolute gem, delightful and thoughtful, serious, sad and also ridiculously funny. It's one of those series that ultimately bites off a bit more than it has time to deliver on, but it's never short on ambition and the talent to pull most of it off.
  6. Hawley's decision to disorient viewers by making David's unsettling and confusing mental landscape the visual launching point for this world is strategically smart--if challenging--and the skillful camera work has a panache that stamps the early episodes. Stylistically, there's nothing quite like Legion's smart take on mutant powers, which keeps the series more dramatic and less light or flippantly Marvel-esque.
  7. Purists might balk, but for the rest of us, the latest retelling of the Superman tale is a brilliant blend of tradition and contemporary sensibility. Not only is it a Superman for a new generation, it's a Superman for every generation. [15 Oct 2001]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  8. The first three episodes of Season 3 indicate there has been no slippage at all, but rather a digging in of the philosophy at hand.
  9. Scene after scene transports viewers across time and space to a place made vivid and real. By doing all this, the robust, two-part, four-hour "Masterpiece Theatre" program raises the bar for future "Jane Eyre" productions to a level that will not be easily hurdled.
  10. The series is excellent, absorbing and addictive. When each episode ends, you long for the next--a hallmark of great dramas.
  11. The dialogue remains as pin-prick sharp as usual, with that clever mix of directness and humor.
  12. It’s certainly an intriguing pilot--you can’t take your eyes off of Spader and the writers have thrown in a couple of other interesting twists.
  13. While a miniseries might have truly been something to behold--allowing the slow helplessness to really penetrate viewers, there’s something to be said about making a big, loud noise and getting the message out--again. In that sense, both Murphy and Kramer do the play justice (as you would expect) and have created a powerful modern history reminder for those too young to understand the all-too-recent past.
  14. Much of the charm in this show, as well as the humor, comes from Rock's ability to vanquish political correctness in favor of a candid but affectionate look at the past.
  15. Think of "The Office," "Larry Sanders," "Spin City" and "Yes Minister" rolled into one delirious stew.
  16. Smart and audacious.
  17. The first chapter of Peter Morgan's chronicle of the rule of Queen Elizabeth II remains gripping across the entirety of the 10 episodes made available to critics, finding both emotional heft in Elizabeth's youthful ascension and unexpected suspense in matters of courtly protocol and etiquette.
  18. here are odd time jumps and plot movements here and there that really prove how much that voiceover narration from Claire is really needed. Not all of these are good things. ... They are not deal-breakers, exactly, but it will be interesting to see if season two can match (or exceed) the lofty achievements of season one. Perhaps the important thing to know is, despite these shifts, Outlander remains as sweeping and addictive as ever, which goes a long way.
  19. In addition to some screwball comedy, it also has a lot of heart.
  20. Although no half-hour TV series is going to capture the visual splendor and sophisticated sound of the big-screen experience, it's surprising how well this series reflects the style, attitude, ideals and spirit of the six "Star Wars" films.
  21. The fantastical creation of Jackie Peyton, perhaps surprisingly, has shades of gray that make her very real indeed. Both show and character are something wonderful to behold -- and worth taking multiple doses of.
  22. A new BBC America sci-fi/thriller that's so good and unsettling and creepy that even grumps like myself can't help but be in its thrall.
  23. The performances of the players are so uniformly terrific that you could do worse than to bring these deeply flawed characters into your living room on a regular basis, as this is a series for which TiVo was invented if ever there was one.
  24. It’s a serious work of television that is angling to dramatize numerous weighty subjects, and isn’t overly concerned with distracting the audience with shiny objects in the process.
  25. Unlike so many adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, this one not only pleases just as it stands but also could inspire a genuine curiosity in many viewers about seeing more of his work.
  26. Outrageous, bizarre, effortlessly hip and unsubtle in magically edgy ways.
  27. Fellowes has a stronger hold on telling the individual tales of his well-drawn characters, and that pinpoint focus utterly redeems the series early on.
  28. The nicely cast ensemble is formidable, but the driving power is the wit and freshness of the writing. It snaps, crackles and pops. [4 Mar 1997]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  29. Through two episodes, The Good Fight feels appropriately like an extension on the brand and unless you discover that what you really liked about The Good Wife was the soap opera of Alicia Florrick's life, you'll find this a welcome return.

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