The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,123 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Brotherhood: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Sons Of Hollywood: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 603
  2. Negative: 0 out of 603
603 tv reviews
  1. Purists might balk, but for the rest of us, the latest retelling of the Superman tale is a brilliant blend of tradition and contemporary sensibility. Not only is it a Superman for a new generation, it's a Superman for every generation. [15 Oct 2001]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  2. The first three episodes of Season 3 indicate there has been no slippage at all, but rather a digging in of the philosophy at hand.
  3. Scene after scene transports viewers across time and space to a place made vivid and real. By doing all this, the robust, two-part, four-hour "Masterpiece Theatre" program raises the bar for future "Jane Eyre" productions to a level that will not be easily hurdled.
  4. The series is excellent, absorbing and addictive. When each episode ends, you long for the next--a hallmark of great dramas.
  5. The dialogue remains as pin-prick sharp as usual, with that clever mix of directness and humor.
  6. It’s certainly an intriguing pilot--you can’t take your eyes off of Spader and the writers have thrown in a couple of other interesting twists.
  7. While a miniseries might have truly been something to behold--allowing the slow helplessness to really penetrate viewers, there’s something to be said about making a big, loud noise and getting the message out--again. In that sense, both Murphy and Kramer do the play justice (as you would expect) and have created a powerful modern history reminder for those too young to understand the all-too-recent past.
  8. Much of the charm in this show, as well as the humor, comes from Rock's ability to vanquish political correctness in favor of a candid but affectionate look at the past.
  9. Think of "The Office," "Larry Sanders," "Spin City" and "Yes Minister" rolled into one delirious stew.
  10. In addition to some screwball comedy, it also has a lot of heart.
  11. Although no half-hour TV series is going to capture the visual splendor and sophisticated sound of the big-screen experience, it's surprising how well this series reflects the style, attitude, ideals and spirit of the six "Star Wars" films.
  12. The fantastical creation of Jackie Peyton, perhaps surprisingly, has shades of gray that make her very real indeed. Both show and character are something wonderful to behold -- and worth taking multiple doses of.
  13. A new BBC America sci-fi/thriller that's so good and unsettling and creepy that even grumps like myself can't help but be in its thrall.
  14. The performances of the players are so uniformly terrific that you could do worse than to bring these deeply flawed characters into your living room on a regular basis, as this is a series for which TiVo was invented if ever there was one.
  15. It’s a serious work of television that is angling to dramatize numerous weighty subjects, and isn’t overly concerned with distracting the audience with shiny objects in the process.
  16. Unlike so many adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, this one not only pleases just as it stands but also could inspire a genuine curiosity in many viewers about seeing more of his work.
  17. Outrageous, bizarre, effortlessly hip and unsubtle in magically edgy ways.
  18. Fellowes has a stronger hold on telling the individual tales of his well-drawn characters, and that pinpoint focus utterly redeems the series early on.
  19. The nicely cast ensemble is formidable, but the driving power is the wit and freshness of the writing. It snaps, crackles and pops. [4 Mar 1997]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  20. Black, a thinking-man's blowhard, carries the concept off with shameless aplomb, while his debating helpers are equal parts witty and wise.
  21. Logan, who has written each of the eight episodes, and director J.A. Bayona (who cements the overall look and feel of the series) keep things intriguing and fresh, fearful and entertaining. The characters are so vastly different from one another but mix well.
  22. One of the new offerings that stands out from the pack is ABC's coming-of-age series, The Goldbergs, which is fueled partly by nostalgia, partly by the great Jeff Garlin's constant yelling and partly out of some outstanding writing. A strong cast doesn't hurt, either.
  23. This is one of the rare situation comedies that relies almost entirely on situations, each of which is more bizarre than the next and at the same time perfectly plausible. It's almost too good.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautifully rendered as the series is, there's a high-concept conflation of the two shows here in the way it marries the mob melodrama of "Sopranos" with "Mad's" period fetishism. It's a savvy programming strategy but robs Boardwalk of a certain freshness that would otherwise elevate it to the same echelon as those TV classics.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's not pretty, and it contains lots of profanity in word and thought ... but it's bound to attract attention and, with luck, lots of hard-core fans. [3 Nov 1995]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  24. She is all over the map and that's precisely what's refreshing about her. What the world needs now is not another over-stylized, super-slick talk show.
  25. The Challenger Disaster adeptly uses its story time by leaning on Hurt to at once capture Feynman’s brilliance and captivating personality while also showing that Feynman’s own sense of compressed mortality and his adherence to scientific truth helped stop what could have been a whitewash.
  26. Seriously, one day, NBC will be run like a real network--and bask in the fact that our Pawnee pals have returned, and there are plenty of excellent episodes in store.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a fine little show, a teenage comedy that's bright, witty and filled with laughs and smiles high-school style, much more than one of those silly teen sitcoms that too often passes for series programming. It's slightly sexy, fun and funny, filled with the kind of personality that could turn it into a solid Saturday night hit. [3 Mar 1994]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  27. A canny revamp, well-lit and visually eye-popping in a shadowy-neon way that hints at the old with several familiar faces while showcasing newcomers including redheaded Ashlee Simpson-Wentz.

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