The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,033 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Frozen Planet: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Dads: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 557
  2. Negative: 0 out of 557
557 tv reviews
  1. Those who gravitate to this engaging show will be rewarded with the kind of substantial, thoughtful fare more often reserved for theater audiences. Plus, there are outstanding performances.
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  2. It's family-friendly and adult-pleasing, over-the-top and nightmarish, witty and deep all at the same time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The production is handsome in the dreamy BBC style, and writer Andrew Davies has done his usual efficient distillation job, including adding a few imaginative touches involving galloping horses and nubile young bodies that would have surprised Austen.
  3. While it is far from apparent that Friday night is the best place for this smart and stylish show, one can assume USA will move it elsewhere, if necessary, to give it the chance it deserves.
  4. It's the clever satire for which we've all been waiting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lurking behind the surface of this raucous comedy is an astute meditation on the promise and peril of leading an unconventional life, something about which aspiring actors know a thing or two.
  5. It's compelling from minute one to credit roll--exciting, smart, realistic and brilliant, all in one brightly lit package.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    To act as if Parks has to be measured against that show's [The Office] standard gives short shrift to a genuinely funny and engaging comedy that bears stylistic similarities to "Office" but has a heart and mind all its own.
  6. The fantastical creation of Jackie Peyton, perhaps surprisingly, has shades of gray that make her very real indeed. Both show and character are something wonderful to behold -- and worth taking multiple doses of.
  7. A canny revamp, well-lit and visually eye-popping in a shadowy-neon way that hints at the old with several familiar faces while showcasing newcomers including redheaded Ashlee Simpson-Wentz.
  8. It is a terrific springboard to a series that is appealing--even compelling--in a variety of ways.
  9. Well-cast and full of expensive-looking special effects, FlashForward should hook a respectable number of viewers with its combination of surprise and suspense.
  10. What is surprising, though, is just how watchable and amusing Brothers is, even if it doesn't break new ground.
  11. This one has more heart and is a better fit with its primetime neighbors.
  12. This is a show packed with smart people who make things happen and, even when following a predictable forgery crime--one that shoots off into interesting side alleys--always are one step ahead of viewers' expectations.
  13. It could be complicated, but Peters' tightly written teleplay makes it easy to follow. In addition, the pilot raises provocative issues without getting didactic. That, combined with mythology less dense than, say, ABC's Lost, should make this an attractive viewing option.
  14. Life's clean, clear storytelling is worth a go-around.
  15. If one can get past the certainty that, like most reality shows, the reality here has been sanitized for everyone's protection, one should enjoy meeting these salt-of-the-earth workers with good hearts, the kind of people who normally are everywhere except on TV.
  16. Justified will not stretch the dramatic envelope the way many FX shows have. Still, with its white knight of a hero, fine guest stars and intriguing relationships, one can rely on the show to deliver 13 hours of entertaining and occasionally taut crime drama.
  17. It's all done so masterfully that by the third installment, Treme has the old-shoe feeling of a series that has been on for years, not weeks. Still, those first three episodes do move slowly, and if there's a sour note to be sounded it's that it takes awhile for the series to find its centerpoint.
  18. For now, "Persons" is delightfully weird and foreboding.
  19. But even as the cop genre seems beyond saturation, along comes TNT's Memphis Beat, a series with a fresh character in a fresh environment with a fresh look and sound that proves, against all odds, that good actors and agile execution trump format every time.
  20. No doubt about it, Futurama and its entire splendid voice cast is back, sly wit, social satire and all. So, too, are the disembodied heads of celebrated figures.
  21. The star also is the writer, director and editor, does a much better job of translating Louis C.K.'s wit and comic irreverence to a weekly series. It deserves to catch on, though it's back-and-forth style might make it a tougher sell to viewersc
  22. In the end, the series itself is something fresh, welcome and a little tart -- and just like a nice citrus fruit, it'll be hard to stop with just one of these.
  23. It's perfect summer television--just turn off the excess brain cells and let Agent Walker do the seduction, and the shooting, for you.
  24. The 13-episode series has all the early earmarks of distinctive drama and smart storytelling.
  25. The show manages to be hugely entertaining and involving thanks mainly to the judges' personalities and the ability of the producers to spot emotionally charged stories when they see them. Sometimes these elements work together.
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  26. Those willing to pay close attention to the long list of characters will be rewarded with a diverting story and several winning performances.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The writing is generally witty, the tone light, the tempo satisfying, the sense of place--palm-reading shops, dead-end bars, beach-town slackers--well drawn.

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