The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,176 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Girls: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Dads: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 629
  2. Negative: 0 out of 629
629 tv reviews
  1. As a follow-up to the groundbreaking summer series "Hopkins 24/7" that ran nearly eight years ago, this revisit to the medical center is, if anything, even more grounded in authenticity and honesty, even if it sometimes feels compelled to pile on the soapy elements.
  2. The perspective one gets from inside the House of Saddam is different than media reports from the outside and is, in itself, an important reason to tune in.
  3. There's a nice balance of humor (Groff in particular gets to milk the comedy) and emotional drama coursing through it (like Girls, which makes a fine pair for it on Sundays).
  4. Justified will not stretch the dramatic envelope the way many FX shows have. Still, with its white knight of a hero, fine guest stars and intriguing relationships, one can rely on the show to deliver 13 hours of entertaining and occasionally taut crime drama.
  5. Coppola and Schwartzman, who has a great cameo about a reporter doing a podcast, dole out just enough in these half-hour episodes to keep it light, funny and (by the fourth episode) a bit more brazenly quirky, while also not losing touch with the story's core--which is the music.
  6. This is a show packed with smart people who make things happen and, even when following a predictable forgery crime--one that shoots off into interesting side alleys--always are one step ahead of viewers' expectations.
  7. It's family-friendly and adult-pleasing, over-the-top and nightmarish, witty and deep all at the same time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The production is handsome in the dreamy BBC style, and writer Andrew Davies has done his usual efficient distillation job, including adding a few imaginative touches involving galloping horses and nubile young bodies that would have surprised Austen.
  8. Some of [the often simple but absurd comedy] was lighter in spots than others, but the series has a very distinctive comedic voice and a striking visual approach that it keeps up through the episodes
  9. The series, which moves along at an engrossing clip, and never allows its characters easy outs, clearly has aspirations to break out of legal-thriller and activist-centric conventions, and should appeal to crime fans as well as those who enjoy a novelistic approach to television.
  10. Going into Season 2, the acting performances are the primary reason to tune in.
  11. Brooding, seductive and smart.
  12. The latest (and last) in the series featuring superhero librarian Flynn Carsen (Noah Wyle) packs more humor, suspense and adventure into two hours than either of its two predecessors.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After more than a year away, Rescue Me is still a compelling drama, full of strong writing and skillful acting, but it's the show's mix of redemption and ruin that genuinely sets it apart from the pack.
  13. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson’s is magnetic as Spencer Strasmore.... That’s not to take anything away from the supporting players; if Johnson is the quarterback, they’re the necessary fullbacks, tackles and tight ends that make the team whole.
  14. There's no such thing as a sure thing when it comes to new TV series, but Back to You is as close as it gets.
  15. Mostly it’s great to see Tennant and Colman try to put back the pieces of the wrecked lives of Hardy and Miller.
  16. The third season, as much as the two preceding ones, continues to breathe new life and vigor into the Western genre. What's more, the actors have become so comfortable in the skins of their characters, we can now appreciate the complexity of their personalities and desires.
  17. An inspiring show all around, though perhaps not in the way Syfy wants it to be because the moment the credits roll, viewers will switch off the TV and start re-evaluating every single item in their basement.
  18. It's an entirely different vibe, further enhanced by a charismatic and quirky central character who is both unpredictable and impossible to pigeonhole. Given a chance to develop, Detective Charlie Crews could someday take a place with the likes of Kojak, Columbo and Monk.
  19. Ripper Street is a well-acted, well-written and compelling mystery series. And even better, there's no waiting around, wishing it would improve. It's alluring from the start.
  20. Those willing to pay close attention to the long list of characters will be rewarded with a diverting story and several winning performances.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    To act as if Parks has to be measured against that show's [The Office] standard gives short shrift to a genuinely funny and engaging comedy that bears stylistic similarities to "Office" but has a heart and mind all its own.
  21. Comedy Central has been able to take a can’t-miss idea and move it from short online sketches to a series of sketches that fill a half hour of television with a unified theme and increased production value, while bringing the brilliant idea to a wider audience.
  22. It’s a charming and decidedly salty series.
  23. It embodies many of the same elements that made Star's HBO half-hour a winner. That means an energetic blend of sex, sophistication, outlandishness and rat-a-tat-tat dialogue spilling from the mouths of effortlessly attractive characters in a sleek setting.
  24. The series is ridiculous in description and enthralling in execution because of Malek’s natural charisma and his way with creator and head writer Sam Esmail’s frequent jeremiads against the powerful and moneyed.
  25. Bette is full of good-natured mischief and proves a surprisingly easy fit for Midler. The weaknesses are obvious enough: a need to ease up on the fat jokes and the broad physical farce that's a little too obvious. But the screen loves Midler, which is never more apparent than during a scene that finds her turning a Kid Rock rap-rock tune into a jazzy swing number. You can't write that into a script; it's pure magic. [11 Oct 2000]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  26. Intriguing and genuinely fun.
  27. The 13-episode series has all the early earmarks of distinctive drama and smart storytelling.

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