The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,127 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Girls: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Charlie's Angels: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 605
  2. Negative: 0 out of 605
605 tv reviews
  1. With its large ensemble cast and frequent flashbacks--visiting and revisiting events that occurred from 23 minutes to 13 months in the past--watching Event is like riding a contraption that is half time machine and half bumper car.
  2. After one show, let's say he's a work in progress.
  3. "Heroes" is one of TV's most imaginative creations and might, with luck, become this year's "Lost."
  4. It's the clever satire for which we've all been waiting.
  5. Some of [the often simple but absurd comedy] was lighter in spots than others, but the series has a very distinctive comedic voice and a striking visual approach that it keeps up through the episodes
  6. It could be complicated, but Peters' tightly written teleplay makes it easy to follow. In addition, the pilot raises provocative issues without getting didactic. That, combined with mythology less dense than, say, ABC's Lost, should make this an attractive viewing option.
  7. In its scripted segments, the series is stylishly produced, and its wit is dry while its tone is bubbly. Not every segment is a hit, but the ones that are deserve to be quoted, repeated and discussed.
  8. It's disappointing that this is a diverting curio rather than a deep plunge into the cold waters of obsession.
  9. Ultimately, Brooklyn DA is an intimate look at urban prosecutors that, even though it can feel a little too clean, certainly stands out among unscripted summer programming.
  10. Kitchen Nightmares pushes all of the proper emotional buttons to draw we viewers in. But we're never for a moment able to suspend the notion that we, the audience, are being played.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Some things are better than they were in the '60s--including the top tier of television shows. This just isn't one of them.
  11. There's a great cast here--including Zeljko Ivanek as the president's Chief Of Staff and budding nemesis to Elizabeth; and Bebe Neuwirth as head of the staff Elizabeth has inherited. Yet the secondary players have yet to pop.
  12. Although the premiere could be more energetic, there's enough going on to coax you to revisit the Buffkins. Hephner shows genuine star potential with his portrayal of brooding Morgan, the moral center of the show. His performance is reason enough to keep watching, though others also stand out.
  13. The fact is, these kinds of grand historical reimaginings can be a scrumptious combination of costume drama acting, soap opera theatrics and pay cable promiscuousness. That'll make the hours fly by. And it doesn't mean your pleasure needs to be all that guilty.
  14. Ultimately, Go On is about a group with quirks and heart, stirred up by Perry, and the pilot is largely appealing until the final minutes, which are as broad as the 405.
  15. The nicely cast ensemble is formidable, but the driving power is the wit and freshness of the writing. It snaps, crackles and pops. [4 Mar 1997]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lurking behind the surface of this raucous comedy is an astute meditation on the promise and peril of leading an unconventional life, something about which aspiring actors know a thing or two.
  16. Heroes of Cosplay is a worthy journey into a world few may be familiar with.
  17. A to Z quickly puts you to sleep with its far-fetched Hallmark-style romance.
  18. Sure enough, HBO's "Recount" is replete with inside politics. But it also has well-written characters, first-class acting and confident directing, which produces a level of tension and suspense you wouldn’t expect in a story about a widely reported recent event.
  19. It could be that, like a lot of sitcom pilots, Broke Girls is trying too hard. But when the jokes work, they're funny, so there's hope.
  20. Shameless is excellent, compelling television from the first moment. As long as it stays true to the roots of the original, it's going to be essential viewing.
  21. Intriguing and genuinely fun.
  22. It’s exciting to watch Momoa and Henderson give riveting performances, so it’s not like there’s nothing to recommend here. It’s just that in watching them do it, you wish the story was giving them more fodder and not bogging itself down in side arcs.
  23. Expect a slow(ish) rollout for Bates Motel, as the first couple of episodes establish character and location, before things take an uptick during episode three. But there’s more than enough intrigue and entertainment--on top of Farmiga’s outstanding turn--to keep viewers wanting more of this new-style nonhomage to Psycho.
  24. Julianna Margulies--also listed as a producer--is convincing as a lawyer whose only true solace is her work. Still, she lives under a black cloud that threatens to burst at any moment and overwhelm the show.
  25. Creator Elizabeth Meriwether manages to make the situations funny and lets Deschanel channel her charm--a winning combination.
  26. The show is pretty darned funny, especially once you get past the 45-minute pilot and into the half-hour regular episodes (smaller is better, actually).
  27. The show is a bold idea, and there's hope for the modern-world portions, but it doesn't quite know what it is (or maybe it does, but the audience won't).
  28. Season two at least appears stronger than last year but this all comes with a caveat, which is pretty much everything before this sentence. That is, Newsroom is the show we’re getting from Sorkin even if it might not, for some of us, be quite the show we wanted.
  29. Both Emerson and Caviezel are compelling and the way Nolan and Abrams have constructed the look (lots of nourish far-away shots in crowded streets, a sense of contained doom in an urban city) bodes well. That alone is worth the investment.
  30. Thus far, Feig and his collaborators have found the right balance of humor and gravity for this celestial comedy.
  31. The series, even after a second episode, is stuck in a rut. After awhile, the insane predicaments of these overprivileged characters are more pathetic than funny.
  32. Showville is far more upbeat and encouraging than that series ["Small Town Security"], and its shift in location from week to week keeps things fresh.
  33. If you’re up for something completely different that may end up imploding just as easily as it could be riveting, then make the commitment. Wayward Pines is filled with enough guest stars and gear shifts to never stay in the same place and thus remain interesting, though not always logical or satisfying.
  34. There's a thriller aspect to it that dovetails nicely with the sassier elements. But the show never devolves into wanton erotica. And all I know is through each of the first four screened episodes, I couldn't wait to get to the next installment.
  35. We get the feeling Grier is much more concerned with scoring a laugh than raising an issue, which makes his well-placed jabs all the more clever.
  36. Shakespeare might be turning in his grave, but he's probably got a smile on his face while doing it.
  37. There almost is nothing here that hasn't been seen before, including creaking doors, cobwebbed mirrors, ghostly visions and a lot of meaningful glances.
  38. A show that has smarts, guts, style and attitude to spare. [14 Apr 2003]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although it can be a tad confusing in the early going, mainly because of some puzzling and violent images from who knows where, those who sit tight are well-rewarded by a stimulating and imaginative work of TV literature. [12 Sep 2003]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  39. Dumb and obvious and formulaic.
  40. Although titled The Defenders, there is no mistaking this stubbornly and unaccountably bland legal show for the bold CBS series of the 1960s with the same name.
  41. Created by Kevin Biegel, Enlisted comes out of the gates almost fully formed.
  42. You have a series that cobbles together a pretty strong rooting interest.
  43. This role is tailor-made for Baker, who has a flair for playing irreverent characters who are crucial to the success of the system even as they tweak its authority figures.
  44. There are intriguing elements amid the clutter: Policeman Frank Leo (Aaron Douglas) is a beefy, moral man of the people who in the process of rallying the troops becomes a target for the police brass.
  45. It should be noted that Geere and Cash are very, very good--they just need better material. (Unfortunately, the rest of the cast, even though they don't get much work, grind the show to a halt--an almost insurmountable problem except that Worst's penchant for trying to shock with crassness is really the stumbling block here).
  46. You should at the very least check out Bello, who does fine work here.
  47. Despite some fine performances, it fails to show a connection.
  48. What's different--and refreshing--about ABC's No Ordinary Family is that the efforts made to convince you that the Powells are normal, while entirely sincere, don't last long. Their supposed normalcy disintegrates into something more fun and potentially more compelling well before the pilot's end credits begin to roll.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The fun part of this series is watching Doe become aware of his powers and limitations. Purcell supplies all the wonder and charm needed to turn Doe into a fascinating and curious character. [19 Sept 2002]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  49. Creator and writer Paul T. Scheuring offers this deal with viewers: Suspend credibility on a few key points and, in return, get a series that keeps you glued to the set for a full hour. My advice is to take the deal.
  50. It’s a lusciously shot and brilliantly written and acted account of how the British aristocracy and progressives in high society fell in love with what can best be described as the tantalizing edginess of jazz music and the sense of exploration and wonder it brought to those who heard it even though society at the time was not ready to accept what it all implied.
  51. The pilot is funny, Meloni holds the whole thing together and even the voice over works--despite there needing to be, at the very least, a five season moratorium on that little conceit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What is clear, is that series stars Anthony Michael Hall and Nicole de Boer are fun to watch and that the powers of Hall's character, Johnny Smith, can give rise to any number of imaginative stories. [12 June 2002]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  52. This is a first-rate series that explores the hearts and minds of terrorists even as it presents scene after scene of suspense and action.
  53. If Lindelof and Perrotta can somehow strike a balance of the human, emotional fallout while also delving into an explanation of the oddities involved in "the sudden departure," then The Leftovers could be one of the more riveting new series.
  54. The visual style is nothing terribly special, but the hues are rich, the writing reasonably clever and the premise a healthy cut above the often lame-o material that passes for creativity in the kiddie toon universe.
  55. A lot worked from this first show. The set looks great, and legendary house band the Roots were, as usual, flawless. When U2 asked them, impromptu, to join in their acoustic jam from the couch, they didn't miss a beat, and the up-tempo atmosphere told the audience one clear thing: Hey, this is fun. You might want to come back and check it out again.
  56. The show succeeds on a number of levels and builds on a well-crafted premise pilot.
  57. The new show dovetails nicely with its lead-in to present a solid hour of skewered news and punctured pomposity.
  58. What Animals is trying to do is take The West Wing and turn it into Dallas. And if you don't like Dallas, that can be a real letdown.
  59. The first pair of episodes augur a breezily entertaining addition to the TNT stable of dramatic originals.
  60. Its efforts at grainy, gritty realism (e.g. a quality visually tried for in occasional stop-go cuts) comes off more as MTV hip-hop style than storytelling with true inherent significance. [30 Sept 1996]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  61. Shores has created a funny, loopy, off-kilter comedy that, truth be told, probably would play just as well on other cable channels, including Comedy Central and TV Land.
  62. A slow-going but fervently earnest series ... a little bit of "Little House on the Prairie," a little bit of "The Waltons." ... But the script is so full of mood and moralizing that it mostly plods. [31 Mar 1994]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  63. While the collection doesn't necessarily bring anything new to the table in its quick portrayals, it does at times successfully ignite an emotional response (a trait that also makes it exhausting.)
  64. The Fox drama from the Imagine TV stable is fortunate to have a guy with the talents of Tim Roth as a trump card. But even apart from him, the writing and the concept are sufficiently developed from the get-go to prove an instantly intriguing entry that has the major benefit of following "American Idol" and should hold on to a good portion of that audience.
  65. The existential aspects of Derek are its best traits (and yes, there will be a second season). The drama and comedy elements are more of a mixed bag.
  66. The video equivalent of a cold fusion experiment. At first the results seem promising but prolonged scrutiny reveals deep flaws...In trying to turn Barry's written P.O.V. into the filling of a weekly sitcom, the humor undergoes a transformation that makes it disappear. From page to screen it can't be seen. [20 Sept 1993]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  67. It bursts with humor thanks to a solid cast, smart writing and a quick pace.
  68. For "Runway" fans thirsty for fashion fights and fits, Fashion is certainly worth a taste.
  69. There is a lot of potential in this series. It's just a shame that it appears to be veering away from something completely different--something darker and more sci-fi and ambitious, and settling into the feel-good, be-safe vibes of both Jurassic Park and Avatar.
  70. Bored prefers droll to funny. Almost implicit in its tone is the attitude that viewers should be satisfied merely hanging out with the literati of New York, flawed though they might be, and not hope for compelling stories and charismatic characters, as well.
  71. Although the original remains the greatest (at least, based on the single Cleveland episode made available for review), the newer sitcom has charm, wit and actresses who could coax laughs reading the fine print of a credit card agreement.
  72. It embodies many of the same elements that made Star's HBO half-hour a winner. That means an energetic blend of sex, sophistication, outlandishness and rat-a-tat-tat dialogue spilling from the mouths of effortlessly attractive characters in a sleek setting.
  73. The writing is sharp enough to create nearly as many solid laughs as there are producers. [21 Aug 1998]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    So far the characters are intriguing, even while some appear to be dunderheads; everybody is being almost unbelievably upbeat and nice. But, despite the trademark MTV cutting and pop music accompaniment, the action will have to pick up soon, or the show will become mired in the torpor that made "An American Family" tough to sit through. [21 May 1992]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  74. The premise of an attractive group of friends living and loving in the Big Apple is not exactly a novel idea, but there's always room for a series that resonates with a distinctive new take, a unique perspective or memorable characters. Unfortunately, this isn't it.
  75. All series need time to discover their strengths and weaknesses, and this is no exception. However, this show starts with a foundation of solid character comedy, which bodes well for the future.
  76. The pilot is clever in a number of places and the banter is quick.... Like Modern Family, which it seems to be aping, The Michael J. Fox show is big on hugs and syrup in the end notes, but that can be overlooked if what precedes it has enough right angles. Unfortunately, the second episode--which airs directly after the pilot tonight--is a complete and utter mess.
  77. It's an entirely different vibe, further enhanced by a charismatic and quirky central character who is both unpredictable and impossible to pigeonhole. Given a chance to develop, Detective Charlie Crews could someday take a place with the likes of Kojak, Columbo and Monk.
  78. A cooking match that has been seen so many times before in one form or another.
  79. The main reason to watch can only be Holly Hunter.... Although she's a prisoner of the material, her performance is so good that it can distract you from this otherwise simplistic take on a complex issue.
  80. It's perfect summer television--just turn off the excess brain cells and let Agent Walker do the seduction, and the shooting, for you.
  81. With Life's Too Short, he [Ricky Gervais] again delivers.
  82. It's dismissible juvenilia ... a collection of poorly paced, lowest-common-denominator setups that are not even sophomorically funny or scatologically goofy. [13 Aug 1997]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  83. The pilot is solid but 22 minutes with this kind of cast and concept barely leaves any room to decipher whether or not you want to spend one night a week with these people.
  84. In the end, the series itself is something fresh, welcome and a little tart -- and just like a nice citrus fruit, it'll be hard to stop with just one of these.
  85. It’s fun, it’s entertaining, it’s got some scares and some action and plenty of secrets to unveil.
  86. Ramsay naturally creates drama wherever he goes, and despite a few forced scenarios, the fly-on-the-wall editing smoothly and engagingly creates narratives amid the chaos.
  87. Sci-fi purists might find it the taste of CBS' "Threshold" disconcerting, but for the rest of us, this is scary fun and suspenseful dramedy.
  88. It is smartly written, particularly well-cast and a worthy vehicle for Louis-Dreyfus and her high-energy comedy.
  89. Does that make sense? If not, well, Revolution doesn't make a lot of sense, but it's a lot of fun.
  90. It takes nothing away from this genuinely talented group of kids to express even greater admiration for the promotion and marketing.
  91. Despite some jitters, Conan looked comfortable in his new domain. He had nervous energy to spare, but then again he does most nights.
  92. It’s a pretty great first hour and if they can keep up the suspense before changing direction, it might be a feat worth watching every week.
  93. There is hope that Better might turn into a solid series: the writing is smart and patient, and dialogue wed to Casey's good-guy dopiness lands well.
  94. Yes, a lot of Taylor goes an awfully little way, "Home Improvement" being a genuinely unfunny transmission devoid of anything much akin to what might remotely be categorized as humor. [17 Sep 1991]
    • The Hollywood Reporter

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