The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,760 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Better Things: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Charlie's Angels: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 943
  2. Negative: 0 out of 943
943 tv reviews
  1. The pacing, the writing, the directing all contribute to making Thirteen seem unusually fresh within the framework of a familiar story, but there's no getting around the fact that Comer, as Ivy, absolutely seizes the opportunity here to be daring.
  2. A show that has smarts, guts, style and attitude to spare. [14 Apr 2003]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  3. Hip in tone but traditional in spirit, it's not at all hard to feel welcome at the Captain.
  4. Darabont uses the TV-series format to break convention not only by defying the predictabilities of the horror genre (boo!) but also by infusing the recipe with more storytelling elan.
  5. A complicated and frequently insightful look at a man who could have been president and whose assassination was one of the last nails in the coffin of '60s idealism.
  6. Not the real thing but a contrived setup that, nonetheless, radiates a mesmerizing draw that keeps you watching. [24 Jun 1993]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  7. "How I Met Your Mother" introduces a level of unpredictability not usually found in comedies.
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  8. It isn't just the only late-night show of its kind hosted by an African American woman. It's also just funny. The writing is good and Thede's delivery is high energy and she's already the most stylish host in the space, not that that's necessarily important either.
  9. It's a one-of-a-kind thriller that rewards your attention with nonstop action, endless surprises, exciting cinematography and a great assortment of characters.
  10. It's compelling from minute one to credit roll--exciting, smart, realistic and brilliant, all in one brightly lit package.
  11. As a follow-up to the groundbreaking summer series "Hopkins 24/7" that ran nearly eight years ago, this revisit to the medical center is, if anything, even more grounded in authenticity and honesty, even if it sometimes feels compelled to pile on the soapy elements.
  12. The perspective one gets from inside the House of Saddam is different than media reports from the outside and is, in itself, an important reason to tune in.
  13. There's a nice balance of humor (Groff in particular gets to milk the comedy) and emotional drama coursing through it (like Girls, which makes a fine pair for it on Sundays).
  14. Justified will not stretch the dramatic envelope the way many FX shows have. Still, with its white knight of a hero, fine guest stars and intriguing relationships, one can rely on the show to deliver 13 hours of entertaining and occasionally taut crime drama.
  15. Lee, who hasn't committed to scripted TV this extensively before, gains confidence as he goes. The closing three episodes move the furthest from the movie's storyline and feel the most free and experimental. She's Gotta Have It is already a very good show and maybe a second season could rewrite some rules the way the movie did.
  16. Through four episodes, the new season of American Crime is another tantalizing dip into a dozen intellectual pots and once again, this is both enriching and frustrating, though more of the former than the latter.
  17. Coppola and Schwartzman, who has a great cameo about a reporter doing a podcast, dole out just enough in these half-hour episodes to keep it light, funny and (by the fourth episode) a bit more brazenly quirky, while also not losing touch with the story's core--which is the music.
  18. This is a show packed with smart people who make things happen and, even when following a predictable forgery crime--one that shoots off into interesting side alleys--always are one step ahead of viewers' expectations.
  19. Unlike NBC's previous musical experiments, it's likely that The Wiz Live! will actually live on in replays and on DVD as audiences try to notice new details, re-experience adored numbers and not have to pause every five minutes for commercials.
  20. This isn't a documentary that has occasional exciting patches. It's a thriller that occasionally does the wonky work of a documentary. It's an episode of Narcos only it's apparently real and chances are good you'll appreciate all of these glimpses into a clandestine and personal world we're not supposed to be seeing without getting hung up on how we came to be seeing it.
  21. It's family-friendly and adult-pleasing, over-the-top and nightmarish, witty and deep all at the same time.
  22. Fortunately, when it isn't asking you to chuckle along with Lance Armstrong's coy self-awareness, Tour de Pharmacy is smart, silly and often hilarious.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The production is handsome in the dreamy BBC style, and writer Andrew Davies has done his usual efficient distillation job, including adding a few imaginative touches involving galloping horses and nubile young bodies that would have surprised Austen.
  23. Some of [the often simple but absurd comedy] was lighter in spots than others, but the series has a very distinctive comedic voice and a striking visual approach that it keeps up through the episodes
  24. The series, which moves along at an engrossing clip, and never allows its characters easy outs, clearly has aspirations to break out of legal-thriller and activist-centric conventions, and should appeal to crime fans as well as those who enjoy a novelistic approach to television.
  25. The first episode, entitled “Sandy Passage,” certainly sets a high bar--a pitch-perfect, brilliantly performed send-up of Albert and David Maysles’ seminal Grey Gardens (1975).... The other two episodes made available for preview aren’t quite up to the level of “Sandy Passage,” but they’re still far from duds.
  26. Is it right to so harshly prosecute someone's intent to do harm? Or is Sadequee a whole-on victim of the anti-Middle Eastern sentiment (directed even at U.S. citizens) that has been stirred up in the wake of 9/11 and is still stoked to this day? No easy answers, here.... There are other complicated stories here as well; the most moving explores the friendship that blossomed between lawyer Nader Hasan and actress Kerry Cahill in the wake of the 2009 shooting at Fort Hood, Texas.
  27. Going into Season 2, the acting performances are the primary reason to tune in.
  28. The latest version remains as wonderfully quirky as all the others, but cleverly adds new layers of depth and character development that will (one would hope) allow it to play out over multiple seasons.
  29. Brooding, seductive and smart.
  30. The latest (and last) in the series featuring superhero librarian Flynn Carsen (Noah Wyle) packs more humor, suspense and adventure into two hours than either of its two predecessors.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After more than a year away, Rescue Me is still a compelling drama, full of strong writing and skillful acting, but it's the show's mix of redemption and ruin that genuinely sets it apart from the pack.
  31. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson’s is magnetic as Spencer Strasmore.... That’s not to take anything away from the supporting players; if Johnson is the quarterback, they’re the necessary fullbacks, tackles and tight ends that make the team whole.
  32. One of TV's sharpest and most provocative comedies.
  33. It’s the third episode--in which Webster romances prospective victim Simone Banerjee (Archie Panjabi)--where the series really sinks in its claws. The villainy that seemed so one-note in the first part of the mini suddenly becomes intriguingly shaded and complicated.
  34. While not quite a documentary war of attrition, Ken Burns and Lynn Novick's The Vietnam War stretches over 10 nights and 18 hours, and even though you feel that length at every turn, the series is meant to wear you down. And yet it's impossible to look away.
  35. None of SMILF would work beyond the struggling single-mom trope if it weren't for Shaw truly announcing herself here as a creative force. ... Showtime looks to have found something special with SMILF.
  36. There's no such thing as a sure thing when it comes to new TV series, but Back to You is as close as it gets.
  37. There's never a sense that Westworld has tripped up, run out of ideas or reverted to some kind of redundancy. On the contrary, the series offers revelatory possibilities and pursues them in massively entertaining fashion.
  38. Mostly it’s great to see Tennant and Colman try to put back the pieces of the wrecked lives of Hardy and Miller.
  39. The start of the fifth season won't launch an armada of think pieces, but if you still get pleasure from watching these flawed, often awful characters make flawed, often funny choices, Girls is still Girls.
  40. The third season, as much as the two preceding ones, continues to breathe new life and vigor into the Western genre. What's more, the actors have become so comfortable in the skins of their characters, we can now appreciate the complexity of their personalities and desires.
  41. An inspiring show all around, though perhaps not in the way Syfy wants it to be because the moment the credits roll, viewers will switch off the TV and start re-evaluating every single item in their basement.
  42. It's an entirely different vibe, further enhanced by a charismatic and quirky central character who is both unpredictable and impossible to pigeonhole. Given a chance to develop, Detective Charlie Crews could someday take a place with the likes of Kojak, Columbo and Monk.
  43. Ripper Street is a well-acted, well-written and compelling mystery series. And even better, there's no waiting around, wishing it would improve. It's alluring from the start.
  44. Those willing to pay close attention to the long list of characters will be rewarded with a diverting story and several winning performances.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    To act as if Parks has to be measured against that show's [The Office] standard gives short shrift to a genuinely funny and engaging comedy that bears stylistic similarities to "Office" but has a heart and mind all its own.
  45. Comedy Central has been able to take a can’t-miss idea and move it from short online sketches to a series of sketches that fill a half hour of television with a unified theme and increased production value, while bringing the brilliant idea to a wider audience.
  46. London Spy is a love story, then, between Danny and Alex first and foremost--one of the most intimate and nuanced of gay love stories put on TV in some time. Smith’s precision in this arena is at the heart of what makes London Spy so good.
  47. It’s a charming and decidedly salty series.
  48. It embodies many of the same elements that made Star's HBO half-hour a winner. That means an energetic blend of sex, sophistication, outlandishness and rat-a-tat-tat dialogue spilling from the mouths of effortlessly attractive characters in a sleek setting.
  49. The series is ridiculous in description and enthralling in execution because of Malek’s natural charisma and his way with creator and head writer Sam Esmail’s frequent jeremiads against the powerful and moneyed.
  50. Bette is full of good-natured mischief and proves a surprisingly easy fit for Midler. The weaknesses are obvious enough: a need to ease up on the fat jokes and the broad physical farce that's a little too obvious. But the screen loves Midler, which is never more apparent than during a scene that finds her turning a Kid Rock rap-rock tune into a jazzy swing number. You can't write that into a script; it's pure magic. [11 Oct 2000]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  51. Intriguing and genuinely fun.
  52. The 13-episode series has all the early earmarks of distinctive drama and smart storytelling.
  53. Creator and writer Paul T. Scheuring offers this deal with viewers: Suspend credibility on a few key points and, in return, get a series that keeps you glued to the set for a full hour. My advice is to take the deal.
  54. Husband-and-wife team Josh Goldsmith and Cathy Yuspa pack the half-hour with oddball characters, zany circumstances and loads of physical comedy, but it's all grounded in enough reality to be utterly believable and irrepressibly funny.
  55. Credit Morgan, the original source material of the book (there is some deviation, according to Morgan) and BBC America for crafting an instantaneously addictive piece of television.
  56. Expect a slow(ish) rollout for Bates Motel, as the first couple of episodes establish character and location, before things take an uptick during episode three. But there’s more than enough intrigue and entertainment--on top of Farmiga’s outstanding turn--to keep viewers wanting more of this new-style nonhomage to Psycho.
  57. The heart remains the same. If you loved it before, you’ll still love it. And if Community wasn’t your kind of humor in the past, it’s not going to be now.
  58. I think by the last of the six episodes I watched, I was more engaged than at any point in the first two seasons, despite the lack of Moura. If you're a Narcos fan, stick with the show through the place-setting opening and know that it finds its footing.
  59. [A] gripping, smartly written, dark and beautifully directed new French series.
  60. What makes her new Netflix documentary series, Chelsea Does, so invigorating [is] she knows she's severely out of her depth, and realizes that's all the more reason to try and wade deeper.
  61. The filmmakers at times push too hard for a sense of freshness and drama. But at its best, the seven-part series is a breathtaking chronicle of species both familiar and rare, some of them engaging in stranger-than-fiction behavior in otherworldly landscapes.
  62. In presenting essentially the same chain of events, Rashomon-style, in Chapters I and II of the 10-episode series, Simien has effectively addressed criticism over the decidedly more scattershot approach favored by the feature; that sharper focus serves the new format well.
  63. Jokes are plentiful and original and the show hums along delivering a lot of welcome joy. It might not be fall-on-the-ground funny, but you can definitely see a strong hand here in the creative writing and spot-on performances.
  64. What further elevates the half-hour is the deadpan, deer-in-the-headlights fashion in which his co-stars orbit around McBride, who seems instinctively to understand that being a delirious bastard means never having to say you're sorry.
  65. It's perfect summer television--just turn off the excess brain cells and let Agent Walker do the seduction, and the shooting, for you.
  66. The sadness and unrest in F Is for Family tempers the humor and keeps the show from ever getting too frivolous. The family of its title gives the show a hopeful core, but it's always looking around the corner for the next stumbling block, so mostly, F Is for Family is entertainingly honest.
  67. The acting here is first-rate, the details sharp and the cinematography superb. In other words, Tudors hasn't lost a step.
  68. A propulsive, gleefully gory six-episode adventure series.
  69. The Trip to Bountiful hits all the right sweet and nostalgic notes without becoming saccharine or overdone.
  70. Larry David was still Larry David rang ultra true in the ninth-season premiere Sunday night. ... It should be, as expected, pretty, pretty good. At this point, of course, even the bits that don't work as seamlessly as you might want (not a new issue) pale in comparison to the joy that comes from watching Larry try to wriggle out of an endless amount of situations.
  71. Your eyes are in for a treat, and Judd grows on you.
  72. I remain interested in Season 2's idiosyncratic storylines, but I found my attention drifting whenever the series time-traveled to Maria's mildly traumatizing teenage years. There's only so much of someone else's psychoanalytical sessions that I'm able to find interesting.
  73. Victoria delivers precisely on two of the most essential elements of making historical fiction work: Is the cast--and particularly the lead--a group you want to spend hours with and does the plot move at a brisk, entertaining clip? That's an emphatic "yes" to both.
  74. Gripping and thrilling.
  75. The show manages to be hugely entertaining and involving thanks mainly to the judges' personalities and the ability of the producers to spot emotionally charged stories when they see them. Sometimes these elements work together.
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  76. It's a promising pilot that gets the balance right on humor and heart, and that's enough reason to give it a chance going forward.
  77. This show goes in for neither cheap gags nor easy stereotypes, crafting a thought-provoking narrative that embodies genuine sociological heft without transforming its subjects into buffoons.
  78. For such a volatile character, Latifah gives a refreshingly restrained performance, and her commanding stillness imbues gravitas into a number of key scenes. She conveys Smith's toughness and earthy sensuality, keeping the demons that drive her forward or nudge her toward self-destruction largely internalized.
  79. "Ellie" is a smart, daring show, full of memorable characters capable of humorous banter in one moment and physical comedy the next. [25 Feb 2002]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  80. The show from creator Nahnatchka Khan is fresh and funny, with fast-paced jokes and witty cynicism in abundance.
  81. Kargman’s intimate knowledge of this elite universe always feels grounded in first-hand experience, and the laughs are frequent and genuine.
  82. There is a slightly claustrophobic feel to some of the pilot--reminiscent of the feeling the revamped Battlestar Galactica gave--but you can't help but feel that on a submarine. Despite that, Last Resort manages to move at a feverish pace, with pulse-pounding twists and turns.
  83. Travel shows have been done and done again, and it's hard to find one that breaks new ground. The most important element is usually not the scenery but the host, and BBC America found a great one in the British actor Dominic Monaghan.
  84. That well-honed dynamic and a sly sense of humor keep Sherlock compelling even when its plotting falters, as it does in part three, "The Great Game."
  85. There's a thriller aspect to it that dovetails nicely with the sassier elements. But the show never devolves into wanton erotica. And all I know is through each of the first four screened episodes, I couldn't wait to get to the next installment.
  86. As Aminata Diallo (Aunjanue Ellis) reminds herself and others repeatedly, one must never give up--and it’s this steadfast hope that makes the story a particularly compelling television event.
  87. The escapism is sky high. Valley remains as charismatic as ever, with McBride's disdainful asides and Haley's chilly creepiness intact. It would be unfortunate if Human Target somehow got soapy or dumber, because good popcorn is rare.
  88. One Mississippi is effectively quiet and understated in many of the ways that Transparent is demonstrative and confrontational, while both shows share an interest in family histories and personal pain.
  89. Realistic it's not, though it's most certainly compelling (and sometimes more) thanks to a game cast and some propulsive, pointed storytelling.
  90. Those who gravitate to this engaging show will be rewarded with the kind of substantial, thoughtful fare more often reserved for theater audiences. Plus, there are outstanding performances.
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  91. Pleasingly, Indian Summers never feels overstuffed, just exceedingly generous in the way it approaches the disparate people and situations portrayed.
  92. The 40-minute film covers the basics--the matriarchal social structure, the intense and lifelong emotional ties, the appalling history of abuse--with energy and clarity, making for a concise overview and a convincing call to action.
  93. It's all done so masterfully that by the third installment, Treme has the old-shoe feeling of a series that has been on for years, not weeks. Still, those first three episodes do move slowly, and if there's a sour note to be sounded it's that it takes awhile for the series to find its centerpoint.
  94. If the film is as disorderly in its structure as the messy family history it surveys, time spent with these wonderful subjects makes that seem sweetly appropriate.
  95. [The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story] often feels like an elaborate stunt, but still ekes out ample nuance, humanity and humor, despite a couple clunky performances that threaten to spin the series into the realm of camp.
  96. AMC's Halt and Catch Fire begins its fourth and final season on Saturday night as good as it has ever been. And it's quite possible that the whole of Halt and Catch Fire is even better than the sum of its parts.
  97. There's a corollary here to Louis CK and his FX series Louie, though Ansari and Master of None are not yet on that level.... What he's proving, with each episode of Master of None, is that he was the right choice for a fresh vision of a TV show.

Top Trailers