The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 8,046 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Fool
Lowest review score: 0 Dirty Love
Score distribution:
8046 movie reviews
  1. Laughs do not exactly pour forth from this dreary and frequently insulting picture.
  2. The movie strands you in two miserable flats with these cliche-ridden characters and a static love story that is as predictable as it is pedestrian.
  3. The real key to the documentary's appeal is its writer-director Phil Rosenthal, creator of the long-running CBS sitcom.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Yes
    Despite many interesting mise-en-scene moments, the film disappointingly feels as sterile as the family's immaculately clean house. In a sense, the movie is too ambitious.
  4. Attempting to mix emotional pathos with broad farce, the film fails on both levels.
  5. Viewers hoping to understand the senseless phenomenon of football hooliganism would do better to rent Alan Clarke's nearly 20-year-old "The Firm."
  6. It's a low-wattage film about a high-wattage event. Which is somewhat disappointing, though you do get a thoughtful, playful, often amusing film about what happened backstage at one of the '60s' great happenings.
  7. While the exact secret to the film’s high-grossing recipe remains a bit of a mystery, it probably has to do with the good-humored chemistry between the unlikely partners, pushing the limits of censorship in the sexual-innuendo department, and a well-written off-the-wall script that makes audiences laugh out loud.
  8. The Eagle is an engaging, if straightforward and one-dimensional.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An intelligent, visually sumptuous drama that embraces the grandeur of the Australian literary classic upon which it's based.
  9. A couple of rather Dickensian supporting roles by Robbie Coltrane and Maximilian Schell fall embarrassingly flat as they are more creations of costumes and makeup than actual flesh-and-blood. But then the same can be said for the entire movie.
  10. Not quite soaring into the heavens, but not exactly crash-landing either, Cloud Atlas is an impressively mounted, emotionally stilted adaptation of British author David Mitchell's bestselling novel.
  11. An enjoyable spoof of Mexican soap operas and the entertainment business itself. The film doesn't ask to be taken seriously but if you absolutely insist, there is pointed commentary about the deep divisions within that society over skin color, gender politics and social backgrounds.
  12. Despite its shameless manipulations and unsubtle approach, it’s an ambitious and well-intentioned feature debut from a director whose future efforts bear attention.
  13. This narrative directing debut by Sacha Gervasi remains absorbing and aptly droll despite a few dramatic ups and downs and, led by large performances by Anthony Hopkins and Helen Mirren.
  14. Ordinary World becomes raggedly enjoyable thanks to the unexpected charms of its leading man.
  15. Charged by a knock-out performance from Samuel L. Jackson, this compelling story of manly redemption will deliver a winning boxoffice combination of word of mouth and ultimately step outside the generic ring of sports lore.
  16. With a scare factor far greater than its modest dimensions initially seem to promise, The Canal is a polished indie psycho-thriller full of macabre twists and nerve-snapping tension.
  17. Though it is convincingly played and sensually shot, the film has about as much narrative as the characters have parts of their bodies covered on the beach.
  18. Bill Murray as FDR? It takes a few minutes to get used to, but once he settles into the role of the 32nd president, the idiosyncratic comic actor does a wonderfully jaunty job of it in Hyde Park on Hudson.
  19. The feature-length film ultimately becomes repetitive, with the lack of contextual information about the subjects’ lives rendering the proceedings shallow.
  20. The film is at its most potent delineating Hefner's role in the American civil rights movement, going beyond the pages of his magazine.
  21. Dark Shadows sinks its teeth half-way into its potentially meaty material but hesitates to go all the way.
  22. Sensitive and highly visual, this Albert Magnoli-directed film is an accomplished and sophisticated example of storytelling. Even those who aren’t Prince fans are likely to be captivated by its energy, enamored with its simple, often poignant storyline.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It packs plenty of rabble-rousing ammunition, but its sloppy execution is unlikely to win any merit badges for marksmanship.
  23. Wong is such a fine, subtle actor that it comes as a surprise to find him a superb martial artist as well, as he convincingly demonstrates the superiority of Ip Man’s technique over competing schools.
  24. More dumb than funny.
  25. Curiously, despite the ever-energetic Tony Scott at the throttle, the sleek new edition isn't as transporting as it should have been.
  26. A fresh, young energetic cast is this wobbly musical comedy's main claim to "Fame."
  27. Bored audiences enduring this talky, aimless film might wish that they, too, were watching the porno film that is seen only in brief snippets.

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