The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,787 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Family Tree: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Unan1mous: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 958
  2. Negative: 0 out of 958
958 tv reviews
  1. The acting--by Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson--is off the charts. The writing and the concept, by series creator and novelist Nic Pizzolatto, undulates from effectively brash soliloquies to penetratingly nuanced moments carried by sparse prose. Lastly, director Cary Joji Fukunaga has created a beautiful, sprawling sense of place (the series is shot and set in Louisiana).
  2. It is doubtful that any war movie on the large or small screen has captured the varied experiences of ordinary soldiers better than Band of Brothers. Whether it's the sheer terror of facing an unseen enemy or the momentary joy following a successful mission, the mini eschews the typical movie cliches while revealing and reveling in the humanity within each member of Easy Company. It explains in large measure why this group of regular guys and others like them have come to be called the Greatest Generation. [5 Sept 2001]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  3. Early episodes of season four are as compelling and entertaining and as well-written and acted as they have been for the past three, which is a tremendous achievement (particularly if it holds--which is likely, but not guaranteed).
  4. Expertly paced--no corners cut, but not flagging, either--and buoyed by subtle shifts in tone mostly rendered through fine performances, this new Howards End is both deftly separate from the classic and successful on its own merits.
  5. In addition to being dark, the first six episodes of the new season are very, very good, something nobody could have taken for granted with Miller and company moving farther and farther from Atwood's source material (and with Morano too busy with a burgeoning feature career to return behind the camera this time around). With Moss again leading the way, The Handmaid's Tale continues to thrive in many of the same emotional, yet soaringly beautiful, ways it succeeded last year--though several key flaws remain unimproved and are sometimes even exacerbated because everything else around them is so good.
  6. It is a gem of a production and would be a highlight of any TV season. Pacific, in its totality, conveys a sense of the combat experience that is as complete and realistic as any work of film could be.
  7. Silicon Valley comes out of the gates as strong as its remarkable freshman season, skewering people, places, ideas and the pomposity of the entire tech world.
  8. The Trip to Bountiful hits all the right sweet and nostalgic notes without becoming saccharine or overdone.
  9. It will be interesting to see how Rylance’s superb performance evolves as Cromwell gets within spitting distance of the throne. For the moment, he’s a perfect model of stoicism, and the few flickers of feeling that cross his face (a smattering of tears after the death of his wife and children) hint that when Cromwell’s downfall comes--as history says it must--it won’t be pretty. The supporting actors are equally excellent.
  10. Long on heart, brimming with great characters, smartly cast, expertly written and funny from start to finish, Family is the obvious choice for best new fall comedy--and possibly best series.
  11. Now entering another wince-inducing season, Larry David proves again that he can mine gold over and over from the same idea.
  12. The series, from creators Bryan Fuller and Barry Sonnenfeld, is a masterful mixture of life, romance, optimism and youthful exuberance, all played out under the threat of instant death.
  13. It was comforting to see that Masters of Sex has depth of vision and plenty of dramatic material to delve into without taking the easy way out with a nipple and a romp every 10 minutes.
  14. There's still a tenuous connection to a sense-making plot (but only realistically if you watched Season 1). ... And yes, that gives me comfort only in the sense that what viewers will see in the opening episodes is such a perversely wonderful hallucinogenic experience--dance numbers, shape-shifting, the creepy sound of frozen people and their chattering teeth, explorations of color, astral plane hijinks and multiple WTF moments--that there's comfort in knowing it's not all just cinematic showboating, a Pollock/Rothko virtual reality with no meaning.
  15. In the second season, some novelty has inevitably worn off, but Dexter is, if anything, more of a paradox and remains one of the most compelling characters on TV.
  16. I remain interested in Season 2's idiosyncratic storylines, but I found my attention drifting whenever the series time-traveled to Maria's mildly traumatizing teenage years. There's only so much of someone else's psychoanalytical sessions that I'm able to find interesting.
  17. The casting on Fargo is superb, but none more so than Thornton, who is absolutely magnetic as the calm killer with a penchant for wry observation.... The four episodes that FX sent are a testament to Hawley’s bold belief that he could tackle such an original piece of cinema and make it work on the small screen.
  18. That well-honed dynamic and a sly sense of humor keep Sherlock compelling even when its plotting falters, as it does in part three, "The Great Game."
  19. Falk proves right out of the gate in season three that You're the Worst looks as creatively dangerous as ever.
  20. Simon and Pelecanos are just beginning to put the machinery of The Deuce into motion in these eight episodes. As an opening act, the show's first season is substantive, provocative and entertaining. It's a journey through a certain kind of hell, but I'm already eager to return.
  21. The second season picks up immediately with Soderbergh's visual flourishes and sense of when to use music or make what amounts to a soundless cloud that surrounds his perfectly framed shots.... That said, The Knick is more than just a visual tour de force. The writing continues to stand out and the characters evolve, while the acting remains top-notch.
  22. While it might seem that Show Me A Hero ... has a distinct "eat your vegetables" aroma to it, what becomes apparent when you settle down to watch is the unmistakable lure of being hooked by the storytelling and the first-class acting.
  23. Good because it’s as funny and sweet and prickly as what viewers got in Season 1, with continued standout performances by Odenkirk and Banks, and a very welcome initial broadening of both McKean’s role as Chuck; and Rhea Seehorn’s role as Kim Wexler, Jimmy’s girlfriend. Yet, bad because there’s also more of the same, as Jimmy struggles to stay on the straight-and-narrow and how that struggle tears at him.
  24. The filmmakers at times push too hard for a sense of freshness and drama. But at its best, the seven-part series is a breathtaking chronicle of species both familiar and rare, some of them engaging in stranger-than-fiction behavior in otherworldly landscapes.
  25. One of TV's sharpest and most provocative comedies.
  26. The third season, as much as the two preceding ones, continues to breathe new life and vigor into the Western genre. What's more, the actors have become so comfortable in the skins of their characters, we can now appreciate the complexity of their personalities and desires.
  27. Khouri's strong writing and sense of character prove the show is no mere soap--does an excellent job of identifying them [storylines] without spending too much time on them.
  28. Lady Dynamite feels like it's delivering Bamford's wounded psyche in whole chunks, sometimes eager to please, sometimes awkwardly confrontational and generally compassionate.
  29. here are odd time jumps and plot movements here and there that really prove how much that voiceover narration from Claire is really needed. Not all of these are good things. ... They are not deal-breakers, exactly, but it will be interesting to see if season two can match (or exceed) the lofty achievements of season one. Perhaps the important thing to know is, despite these shifts, Outlander remains as sweeping and addictive as ever, which goes a long way.
  30. Pick a character--the laughs are there. Maybe this season we should give more credit to the intricate plotting. But no matter your preference, Silicon Valley is back and the world has once again been made right, at least for the moment.

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