The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,119 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Broadchurch: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 603
  2. Negative: 0 out of 603
603 tv reviews
  1. It's a Western miniseries with impeccable pedigree, memorable characters, breathtaking cinematography and a story that seems almost as if it had been put together by a committee.
  2. The buzz is that "My Name Is Earl" is good, and the truth is that it's better than the buzz.
  3. Director/co-producer/co-writer Michael Sucsy gets their plight, and he's unflinching about exploiting it. But it's hard to say he exposes the heart of his characters; Little Edie's motivation remains a mystery.
  4. It's not a perfect pilot; most sitcoms aren't. But, like a precious few others, you can see that everyone involved is funny and connected to the concept.
  5. Hall... is brilliant at conveying the subtle complexity of Dexter.
  6. The Bridge is mandatory viewing for drama lovers, but it will be interesting to see where the writers take it and whether they have the big-league ability to make the evident potential materialize. One thing they’ve hopefully learned is that sometimes holding back information isn’t mysterious, it’s just confusing.
  7. There's much to admire about Mad Men, and much worth tuning in for. But so far, it's all soft sell.
  8. As Aminata Diallo (Aunjanue Ellis) reminds herself and others repeatedly, one must never give up--and it’s this steadfast hope that makes the story a particularly compelling television event.
  9. Crossfire Hurricane is business as usual from the Stones, and good fun on its own terms. However, anyone expecting buried treasure or fresh insights into ancient rock folklore will get no satisfaction here.
  10. The latest (and last) in the series featuring superhero librarian Flynn Carsen (Noah Wyle) packs more humor, suspense and adventure into two hours than either of its two predecessors.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a breezy propulsion to An Adventure in Space and Time--written by Sherlock's Mark Gatiss, a member of the Steven Moffat mafia--as it charts the evolution of Doctor Who and the invention of so many things beloved by Whovians the world over.... But it’s David Bradley who gives this telefilm its heart.
  11. Bringing [Saul and Carrie] to the forefront and giving them a lot of scenes in the first two episodes has strengthened the series. The writing and acting in the first two episodes are exceptional. Let’s hope this continues, because it’s once again thrilling to watch this show.
  12. It has the wit and bite that made the series a standout, but it has jettisoned much of the dramatic baggage that had begun to weigh the show down.
  13. There's a lot to be gained from Sonic Highways, but it probably won't appeal to those outside of hardcore music appreciation circles, or those who are out on Friday nights.
  14. For all its gore, Dead Set has a frightening lack of suspense. Then again, except for Kelly (Jaime Winstone), a "Big Brother" producer with a dysfunctional love life, most of the characters are so lacking in humanity that the transition to zombie isn't much of a leap.
  15. Not the real thing but a contrived setup that, nonetheless, radiates a mesmerizing draw that keeps you watching. [24 Jun 1993]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  16. The Aliens pilot has some of the funniest writing on TV this fall.
  17. No doubt about it, Futurama and its entire splendid voice cast is back, sly wit, social satire and all. So, too, are the disembodied heads of celebrated figures.
  18. It's a heavyweight new contender in the drama category, just as Netflix now is as a content provider.
  19. It's family-friendly and adult-pleasing, over-the-top and nightmarish, witty and deep all at the same time.
  20. Even at a commercial-free 30 minutes, Last Week Tonight felt rushed and jam-packed with information, heightened by Oliver's tendency to get excited and/or yell. Those are all good traits (and, historically, pretty funny traits of his), but the entire concept might work better at an hour so he could at least breathe.
  21. Elba has been fantastic at every step, taking Cross' wonderful writing it and giving it even more dimensions. Pretty much every character that walks into this miniseries has given a virtuoso performance.... Season three never disappoints even when you kind of recoil, as a viewer, at the evil that has landed in Luther’s already complicated life.
  22. Going into its third season, Girls is as refreshing and audacious as ever and one of the few half-hour dramedies where you can feel its heart pounding and see its belly ripple with laughter.
  23. The fantastical creation of Jackie Peyton, perhaps surprisingly, has shades of gray that make her very real indeed. Both show and character are something wonderful to behold -- and worth taking multiple doses of.
  24. After all the cream-puff politicians and supposedly brilliant strategists that the Underwoods have fooled all too easily in the first two seasons, a little payback and a little failure plays well for House of Cards.
  25. Enjoyable but hardly revealing for longtime fans, the doc provides a reasonable introduction for younger audiences.
  26. Purists might balk, but for the rest of us, the latest retelling of the Superman tale is a brilliant blend of tradition and contemporary sensibility. Not only is it a Superman for a new generation, it's a Superman for every generation. [15 Oct 2001]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  27. Code is not a game-changer in a genre that likely won't be changed again for some time, but judging by the first three episodes it's already gripping television and Fox has found a competitive new drama.
  28. This is a warmhearted dramedy, which gushes charm and family appeal.
  29. The pervasive "what about the children" atmosphere we live in might be exactly what makes Greg Garcia's new Fox sitcom "Raising Hope" so wryly, delightfully, honestly hilarious.

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