The Independent on Sunday (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 789 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Chop Chop
Lowest review score: 20 Last Night on Earth
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 14 out of 789
789 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Both gently gripping and strangely sinister.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is a very capable attempt to update that swoonable sound, and the arrangements do offer a few contemporary touches.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It adds up to a shallowly appealing, summery package; glossily produced and personality free.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The treatments range from Schifrin/Morricone atmospherics to full on Prokofiev/Tchaikovsky bombast, with results which are variable, but the scary choral, Omen-style version of "Where's Your Head At" is a hoot.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It is derivative and woebegone and its musical twists are seldom hard to predict, but it is also finely crafted and devoid of the phoniness which can make such works unbearable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's all a bit "junior school music project" at times, and there's nothing John Cale wasn't doing half a century ago, but it's nevertheless an impressive work.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For anyone who lived through grunge, this is mere nostalgia. Anyone who didn't is advised to go straight to the source.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He comes on like a Conor Oberst meets Brian Wilson in a ramshackle approach that sounds to these ears like a refreshing burst of honest emotion in an often pallid musical landscape.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ferguson's smoky tones recall the young Aretha Franklin at her more restrained, [but] it's all ever so slightly boring.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Essential for fans, of course. It is left to the rest of us to look on from a safe distance with our hard hats on and to marvel at the most self-regarding singing voice in post-war popular music.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's charming enough, but it's as well mannered as a picnic with Cath Kidston accoutrements.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Gimmicks aside, any version of TFIM with a core of "Little Shocks", "Start with Nothing", "When all is Quiet", "Man on Mars" and "Heard it Break" won't go far wrong. [Review of UK release The Future Is Medieval]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Casual bystanders might wish for more memorable songs or some advancement of the form.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Bradley, a 62-year-old ex-plumber and James Brown impersonator, has a raspy, infinitely pained voice but there doesn't appear to be any real interaction between him and the band.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's two-thirds pretty good, all the same.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Precocious, certainly, exhilarating, at times, Lorde’s debut album is almost but not quite as good as it thinks it is.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    DeMent cuts through the sheen with a simplicity that reaches back through decades.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She's an oblique writer and arranger, though, often interesting, never predictable.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The very home-made, amateur-sounding production, coupled with what was obviously a fully formed musical vision, carries great charm and will appeal to fans of Scottish indie jazz weirdo Bill Wells as much as funkers, although only the first two of eight tracks excel.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It is a lush thing that, were we writing for a certain type of women’s mag, might have us reaching for words such as "candles" and "bubble bath."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a shame the God-bothering pomp of John Legend collaboration "The Believer" spoils it all at the end.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lakeman writes, sings, plays, produces and mixes, which may or may not explain the rather dry, stoney sound of the album and the rhythmic forthrightness of the playing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As is conventional with contract filler, this is not going to be a go-to album in the canon.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Too safe, too familiar...and was that really a power-ballad key change? Good guitarist when the songs allow it, though.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It does just enough to bring "happy" to you, and you've gotta love the black humour of any band who'd call a song "God Help This Divorce".
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Origin of Love is an autotuned, multitracked meringue whose ingredients include 10cc and Buggles, and whose only weakness is the absence of a killer single.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's actually a more interesting artifact than the Mitchell one. Having said that, it is also hobbled by a paucity of good songs and a slightly splashy production. Solomon rides the turbulence like a whale.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Blue Note debut can be as frustratingly tentative as his first outing for RCA 15 years ago.... Things do heat up, with drummer Eric Harland stoking the fires, but there's no big flame.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    LP1
    The writing is generic, the studio-craft impressive. Enjoyment will depend on how you get on with the voice and its hooting cannonade of mannerisms.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Venturing further into radio-friendly pop-rock than ever before, her fourth album showcases a strong voice which (unlike brother Rufus) actually hits the notes.