The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 971 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Ghosts of Highway 20
Lowest review score: 20 Violet Cries
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 17 out of 971
971 music reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Balanced by bitter barbs at modern snivellers and shysters in Time of Dust itself, the result is a compact but concentrated dose of poison.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ironically, given its disillusioned tone, After the Disco offers welcome confirmation of the vast and varied terrain available to pop and rock when it dares stray away from the mainstream or merely contemporary.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At its best, on “Ride My Dub”, “Expanding Dub” and “Call It Dub”, the results offer snatched glimpses of the eternal in the fleeting moment. Even better than its parent album.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gudmundur Kristinn Jónsson's production envelops Asgeir's fragile gifts in delicately wrought arrangements.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Emmaar is a typically impressive blend of the emotional and the political from Tinariwen.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a much better album than Sea Change, just as immersive, but wiser and less indulgently wallowing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout there’s a determination to find the appeal in paradox, notably the beguiling blend of cool and cumbersome that carries the love song “Prince Johnny” to another place.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The sonic thinness which seems inherent to Mount remains his limiting weakness, and modest strength.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite being written by different combinations of the line-up, it’s possibly their most homogenous album, most songs riding gentle pulses of percussion, organ and piano, guitars circling the action.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Too much is still being worked through, though, for this to be the exhilarating, post-depression party its best music suggests.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It retains their signature blend of folk-rock songcraft and miasmic guitar-drone textures, but in a more purposive manner.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the elements don’t always hang together, there’s no shortage of intriguing ideas.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reconstituted with a brawny two-guitar attack, The Hold Steady return with another portfolio of dirty-realist tableaux in Teeth Dreams.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A bleak but alluring album.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Macero’s edits on the original double-album collaged four nights’ shows into a single, 20-minute track apiece; but this 4CD set presents each night’s ebullient flow in full.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Both musically and lyrically, the project cleaves to that kind of silly-spooky, funfair innocence, in a way that lends the album a freakish, cartoon unity denied to some of Tare’s previous projects.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tarpaper Sky finds him relaxed and confident in his craft.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Smoke Fairies’ fourth album finds the English duo taking a tangent from their folk/blues approach with the help of a young producer, Kristofer Harris, who gives them a textured sound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ["Mr Tembo" is] a rare moment of extrovert cheer on an intimate, introspective album that takes tentative steps to reveal the soul behind the star.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lurking behind the cosmicity, there’s usually a solid pop hook.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bohemian legend and walking R&B encyclopaedia Chuck Weiss is on great form on this latest album.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    “The Satellites” opens the album with tart trumpets over staccato guitars, “To Us All” closes it with an oceanic excursion. In between are liquid pools of guitar and chattering keyboards.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the limited instrumental palette, there’s a broad variety of approaches.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rising US indie combo Parquet Courts make giant strides on this third outing, where they locate an effective nexus where grunge meets meets avant-rock in colourful pop livery.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is an engaging, youthful and thoughtful folk-rock.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Set to scratchy, fractured beats and sound-montages, it’s a welcome dose of no-age hip-hop in direct line of descent from De La Soul.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    West London synth duo Jungle claim to “bring the heat” on their debut album, but it’s more the languid haze of a holiday beach than the intensity of a dancefloor.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No surprise then that this first solo album following her second wind is full of exquisite craftsmanship.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a far cry from the usual meat’n’spuds rock that has characterised most Morrissey albums; and a welcome change, suggesting perhaps that this most British of pop bards is renegotiating his own boundaries.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The determination to include generous dollops of each member’s solo output means that the acoustic set sags badly. But the obscure material is welcome.