The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 872 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Happy People
Lowest review score: 20 The Awakening
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 17 out of 872
872 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Wagner's hesitant delivery is poignantly underscored by Tidwell's more emotive phrasing, while the arrangements of neat picking and weeping fiddle are applied with customary understatement.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She harmonises piquantly with herself over the languid guitar groove, and B.o.B's rap is pleasingly modest enough, too. The same can't really be said of such tracks as "Casualty Of Love" and "Rainbow", however, both singularly unimpressive songs tricked out with the showy vocal bling favoured by R&B divas as a substitute for genuine soul.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The fingering and virtuoso touches, the deft harmonics, the subtle string-bends are all delivered with minimal fuss throughout, whether it's a solo piece like the wistful "Dery Miss Grsk", the Bach transposition "Cello Prelude In G", which works so well with his instrument or the jaunty ragtime of "Ugly James".
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This 2CD set features one disc of early rarities, and one of sundry items from Cash's Columbia catalogue--not the most comfortable combination, but not without interest.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Comeback albums, it seems, are not just for other bands to do.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    But it's Alex Glasgow's lament "Close the Coalhouse Door" that packs the most powerful punch, the cyclical piano like a minimalist murmur behind Becky's poignant delivery.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A couple of tracks feature delicate tracery of classical guitar, but the most baffling feature of the album is the inclusion of three old tracks by Can, which possess a lightness, and dynamic character somewhat absent in the rest of the score.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While a dozen singles will probably be lifted from Doggumentary, as an album experience it's an utter dogg's breakfast – as might be expected from a project that credits no fewer than 20 different producers and 35 engineers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Burke's presence remains as commanding as ever even when the material sags.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On his first album in 13 years, Robbie Robertson resumes his fascination with the great American mythos.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    EP
    Though inspired by Grace Jones's new-wave disco torch-songs, the results are markedly dissimilar.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This six-track soundtrack EP of songs by Alex Turner finds the Arctic Monkey in appropriately reflective, wistful mood, as befits the hero's fanciful view of himself as a bit of a thinker.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Their problem is a lack of originality: they never suggest they'll find a new angle on well-worn roots-rock modes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Musically, the 400 Unit is equally at home on Little Feat-style swamp-funk, and more countrified collations of fiddle and mandolin.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The pair have weaved Anderson's songs together with various ambient elements--traffic noise, birdsong, the tinkle of teacups on saucers--to create a song-cycle that illuminates the exceptional in the everyday.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It seems like they just ran out of interest, and gave up.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a gentle, woozy mood-scape in which nostalgia for the candyfloss summers of childhood shades imperceptibly into the sweet melancholy of encroaching autumn.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Paul Simon's ruminations here on love, age and encroaching mortality have a valedictory flavour about them.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The enjoyable only just outweighs the annoying on the opener "Never Let Me Go", where the auto-tuned vocal is a let-down.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Her casual observations on club life and love life tumble over each other with a light, mischievous touch that's refreshingly free of grating attitude.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Overall, it treads an uncertain line between bombast and sensitivity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The densely-textured arrangements can get a bit stodgy in places, and the last few tracks slip into dreary bubblebath-boudoir mode, but Bootsy's blithe drawl, the vocal equivalent of a bubble, is usually around to lift one's spirits.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While the arrangements, built around producer Jay Joyce's shimmering guitars and Giles Reaves' keyboards and percussion, offer atmospheric settings for Emmylou's harmonies, the glistening, featherlight textures leave the album drifting in the doldrums.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's all delivered with their usual panache, though at times the emphasis on utility leaves one yearning for a little of their more psychedelic extremity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Guillemots have never been short on ambition, and Walk the River opens accordingly, with trepidation and expectation wrapped up together in the title-track's foreboding intro riff, as Fyfe Dangerfield sings of "backing out of the race".
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Taken from a show in Pittsburgh in September 1980, Live Forever is the last recorded concert by Marley and The Wailers, but while it represents them at the broadest extent of their appeal, it by no means captures the band at their most potent.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Not a party album.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He's no fool: the result is an even more potent clutch of instrumentals, punctuated with the occasional vocal from Sharon Jones and some surprising male singers, including The National's Matt Berninger and Lou Reed.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With the striking falsetto of Peter Silberman dominating their songs, The Antlers may be America's equivalent of Wild Beasts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lyrically, there's a pervasive fascination with California outsider culture that soon palls, though the troubled relationship excavated in "Marked" suggests a deeper vein of inspiration may yet be mined.