The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 847 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Graceland [25th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 20 Stronger
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 16 out of 847
847 music reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    T-Bone Burnett renders mostly old jazz numbers with a blend of period feel and modern fidelity, so they're "in the tradition" without sounding antique.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Traveling Alone sounds like her best album yet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The more languid, erotic performances are balanced by ones on which Deantoni Parks' drums dictate the mood through their rattling, martial bustle.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a world-weariness to some of his songs that's as attractive now as ever.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a gently moving meditation on the effects of solitude and nature on the soul, set to Lytle's characteristic blend of chugging guitar grooves aerated by bubbling synths and soothed by high harmonies.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This year's version features the usual relaxed jazz-pop grooves, sophisticated horn arrangements and tinder-dry ironic tone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Young's best album in some while.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tracey Thorn takes a wider brief than usual for her Christmas Album Tinsel & Lights, mostly avoiding the routine carols and standards in favour of left-field choices.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Coup [has a] breadth of musical settings, which range from indie guitar riffs to itchy techno pulses to a string quartet and French horns.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lux
    Whereas most 75-minute albums of short songs swiftly pall, Lux never bores because it's never making foreground demands on your attention.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Weeknd weasels his way queasily into unprotected affections under cover of arrangements whose dark, miasmic synth tones and itchy, sludgy rhythms blend the apparently conflicting worlds of R&B and industrial new-wave.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Example's obvious delight in sensory experience shines through in his intricate play of syllables and the warmth of his singing voice. His best yet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a surprisingly enjoyable transformation for some of the tunes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's an assured balance of passion and restraint in his takes on "I'd Rather Go Blind" and "I Only Have Eyes For You", though his "Lonely Avenue" lacks Ray Charles' relaxed slouch.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is a strangely addictive quality to hearing something quite so aggressively sui generis as this.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [Title track "Mars" is] a rare misstep on an album that looks to both East and West, and reaches simultaneously into the past and the future.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Van Morrison's best album in some while is a set of songs that, despite the relaxed tone of their jazz-blues settings, foam with indignation about the venality of capitalist adventurism.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The 10 albums that comprise this box set depict one of the most extraordinary career arcs in all of pop music, testament to the questing intelligence with which Joni Mitchell approached music.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's an absorbing, sometimes harrowing ride.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's all delivered with customary warmth and swing from Miller's home studio.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a virtually faultless set, with plenty of neat touches personalising familiar material.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's beautifully presented in an absorbing blend of acoustic guitar, piano, cello, and the occasional tint of vibes or ambient colouration.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This UK quartet conjure a beguiling air of eternal youth in all its charming contradictions, a sunburst of yearning, tedium and expectation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album features slow-burning grooves that build steadily from modestly minimal to euphorically exultant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's an unashamedly middle-aged affair, from the quietly moving affirmation of devotion in "Two Children" to the comforting reverie of "I Remember You".
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eels songwriter Mark "E" Everett has always trod a peculiar, idiosyncratic path that runs parallel to most pop music, but here he collides with it in such a tender, open way that the emotional hit of some songs is quite shocking.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Electric finds Richard Thompson at his most stripped-down and potent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ron Sexsmith writes with a similar emotional honesty to Mark Everett, but in a more classic style, akin to the moving simplicity of Tim Hardin.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [The first three] tracks follow fairly seamlessly on from MBV's previous work, but thereafter subtle changes are applied that tug the album into pastures new.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mark Lanegan's darkly knowing interpretation is one of the highlights of this compilation tribute.