The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 847 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Landing On A Hundred
Lowest review score: 20 Little Red
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 16 out of 847
847 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    He's keen to please, but what's remarkable about The Lady Killer is that he manages to avoid all the bubblebath boudoir-soul cliches that litter most R&B albums.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Like Picasso, he acknowledges that the chief enemy of creativity is good taste--which is just as well, since it's not a quality with which he seems over-burdened on My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy. For which we should all be thankful.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kiss Each Other Clean is much more focused and homogenous, but there's still a lingering sense of abundant inspiration, eager to carry the songs off to different lairs.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With Helplessness Blues, Fleet Foxes triumphantly deliver on the promise of their popular debut, the album that helped establish folk-rock once again as a formidable commercial force rather than just a fringe interest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There's a consistency and homogeneity about the 11 tracks (seven from The Red Shoes, four from The Sensual World) which echoes her work on Aerial, and which lends the project a character entirely its own.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    D
    Is there nothing they can't do?
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    ["A Little Bit Of Everything"] is a thoughtful, mature conclusion to an album that seems to summarise one of the more welcoming trends in American rock
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    On this, Gillian Welch's fifth album, the familiar blending of traditional sounds and moods with modern sensibilities is effortlessly sustained through songs like the mordant "The Way It Goes" ("Betsy Johnson bought the farm, stuck a needle in her arm, that's the way that it goes").
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Twenty-five years ago, Lifes Rich Pageant found R.E.M. metamorphosing from what was effectively a turbo-charged folk-rock cult indie outfit into a proper rock band capable of filling stadia.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    His symphonic-soul innovations here would map out the course of much 1970s soul music, while his use of multi-layered vocals – the happy result of an engineer accidentally running two vocal takes in the same mix – added an extra element to Gaye's vocal armoury which he would use extensively throughout the rest of his career.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's a relief to report that Pull Up Some Dust And Sit Down is his best effort by far since Chavez Ravine.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An album which contains no filler at all, each track blooming in its own way like a collection of strange desert succulents, with a whole lot of hollerin' and a touch of Lieber-Stollerin'.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Not only did they change the course of rock music; they also sustained an inspired creativity for almost two decades, something that the career arc of this retrospective brings into focus, right down to the Bacharach-esque touches of the final unreleased tracks, which pleasingly bring things full-circle in certain ways.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Soul Time! is a near-perfect expression of retro-soul style that grips from its opening bars.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The result is a lush, immersive work which is sonically more homogeneous than her earlier albums.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It all adds up to probably the best Stones album since... well, since Some Girls, actually.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There's an urgency and drive about these tracks that's simply exhilarating.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Roots' 13th album may be their best.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    That he manages to express such ethical and religious principles without coming across like a sanctimonious buzz-killer is quite remarkable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Taken as a whole, it's a marvellous piece of work, boasting a rare congruence between lyrical themes and musical evocations, and fronted by one of the most broodingly characterful voices in rock music.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    [It is] possibly the band's best album.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    These 10 tracks are a masterclass in modern pop creation, pinballing from style to style without endangering their essential "TingTingness".
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    [The] debut album sparkles with invention and throbs with emotion.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    [Wrecking Ball is] unquestionably his most potent album so far this century.
    • The Independent (UK)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Just a series of great, swampy soul grooves, fronted by the most arresting new voice you'll hear this year, and the kind of natural songwriting that seems to contain the entire history of Southern music within its staves.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The character of the base music here is overwhelming: complex, ebullient and life-affirming, and in yoking this intricate dance music to his sophisticated New Yorker sensibility, Simon created a transatlantic bridge that neither pandered to nor patronised either culture.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An engagingly outre delight.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Despite restlessly exploring hitherto untrodden musical terrain, there are precious few wasted seconds in these three hours.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Lone soul genius Cody ChesnuTT's in dazzling form on Landing on a Hundred, which must be the most impressive crowd-funded album ever.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Staves are like a distillation of all that's best about the folk heritages of England and America.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Part of its success is due to Stevens' uniquely ambivalent position, at once ingenious and ingenuous.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Truly, the album of a lifetime.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With results both as pleasurable, as inventive and as absorbing as these, there seems no danger that the impact of {Awayland} will be merely momentary.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Centralia is by far the most satisfying release to date by the Brooklyn-based minimalist post-rock duo Mountains.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    These are big themes, dealt with imaginatively by a singer and a band both operating at the peak of their powers. Album of the year?
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It remains one of pop's most impervious generational touchstones.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s certainly rare to hear a comeback effort that not only reflects an artist’s own best work, but stands alongside it in terms of quality, as The Next Day does.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Roth fits Hunter like a glove, bringing out the warmth of his brass section and framing his raw voice in perfectly judged R&B arrangements that spark and bounce.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kouyate's electrification of his ngoni lute is just as effective a sign of resistance: fed through a wah-wah pedal, his serpentine, fleet-fingered lead lines gain a fresh, assertive power on songs.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Inspiration Information [is] repackaged with an extra disc of pieces recorded since then, which show his abilities undiminished by age.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The warm but haunting Trouble Will Find Me will surely cement their accession to the rock mainstream.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Once I Was an Eagle is a work that demands to be taken as a whole, another reminder of the peculiar power of the album form, despite frequent premature declarations of its redundancy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Wood is one of our finest songwriters, a brilliant exponent of the topical troubadour form, and rarely on better form than he is with None the Wiser.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's music that slips between the generic niches favoured by broadcasters; but isn't that exactly where the most interesting music comes from?
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It reveals a broader musical and emotional palette than they've exposed before.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The singer has matched Bernie Taupin's best crop of lyrics for years with his own most emotively apt melodies to produce a collection that both harks back to the intrigues and interests of his earliest recordings, yet manages to break new ground, quite an achievement for an artist in his sixth decade.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's simply marvellous, an unalloyed joy from first to last, with Robbie Robertson's finely wrought storytelling songs augmented by a few well-chosen covers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Fascinating, enjoyable and original.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Though already condemned by Van himself, there's much to appreciate about this 4-CD expanded edition of one of the greatest albums ever recorded. It's fascinating to follow the development of a track such as "Caravan" across half a dozen takes.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's an extraordinary collection, which demonstrates exactly why Guthrie was perhaps the only performer who could square the circle pointedly implied by the title American Radical Patriot.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's an enchanting snapshot of British rock'n'roll at its moment of greatest revelation, the point at which the Tin Pan Alley production line of ersatz Elvises was rendered utterly obsolete.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    If it's not quite the jump from Bob Dylan to The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, it's the closest recent equivalent, a prodigious rate of development for such a tyro talent, all the more remarkable for not being reliant on significant musical progression, so much as raw songwriting ability.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the truest, wisest albums you’ll ever hear.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Comprising equal parts Stones raunch and REM-style country-rock, songwriters Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley are working at the peak of their powers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Caustic Love may be the best UK R&B album since the 1970s blue-eyed-soul heyday of Rod Stewart and Joe Cocker.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There’s an ever-expanding diversity of appeal to Turn Blue that should win new fans and please the faithful.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    At only nine tracks long, but with every one of them worthy of single status, it displays, as pop albums go, both rare economy and staggering consistency.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    LP1
    FKA Twigs emerges the high priestess of R&B's latest corruption, and the world will kneel at the altar.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Popular Problems--note the drolly contradictory title--finds his agreeable baritone growl applied as usual to romantic disappointment and political venality with vivid, jolting metaphors (“I see the ghost of culture, with numbers on his wrist”) cutting to the quick.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    All told, it’s a magnificent, career-defining set, full of hard-won wisdom, assertive independence--and compassion in abundance.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Unlike most gothic pop, Lanegan’s art is not a matter of fashion or mascara: it’s a genuine cri du coeur, as rare and beautiful as anything in music.