The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 1,397 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Automatic for the People [25th Anniversary Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 20 Violet Cries
Score distribution:
1397 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s Vance’s sepia growl of a voice that grips most on The Wild Swan, bringing raw conviction especially to the opener “Noam Chomsky Is A Soft Revolution.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though neither particularly new nor classic, Iggy Azalea’s debut album proper (following two self-released mixtapes) reveals enough smarts and skills to sustain the Aussie rapper’s momentum.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Throughout Synthetica, an undertow of dystopian unease drags the music away from standard pop territory into darker areas.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He remains a more psychedelic soul, as witness psych-rockers like “Mad Shelley’s Letterbox” and “Detective Mindhorn”. With a sort of repressed power anchoring its drive.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Produced by her son Cisco Ryder, it’s a family album of elegant songs, well-framed in folk-rock settings.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Beady Eye may be just Oasis minus Noel, but this debut is rather better than the past few Oasis albums, if sadly no more innovative.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While Martin Simpson’s peerless fingerpicking is in full effect throughout Trails & Tribulations, what’s equally impressive is the way his arrangements reflect the material with empathic sensitivity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Merritt's main problem may be that his baritone croon makes him sound cynical even when he's baring his heart, an impression only partly undercut by his occasional ukulele strum.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As it is, these seven surviving tracks capture a group in transition from R&B covers outfit to something more significant.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The tableaux of refugee camps, warzones and dereliction--an abandoned building littered with syringes and shit, a drug-riddled neighbourhood, a polluted river, “a displaced family eating a cold horse’s hoof”--builds grimly throughout, albeit to uncertain ends.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's punk-folk pop with its heart on its sleeve and urgency overwhelming reflection, closer to Green Day than, say, Leonard Cohen.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While imparting a palpable sense of immediacy to the performances, there are some tracks that could do with more work.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The creepier explorations of infantile eroticism--the lollipop metaphor of “All Day Suckers”, the fairytale allusion of “Baby Teeth, Wolfy Teeth”--are voiced by Harvey himself, allowing guest singers like Jess Ribeiro and Sophia Brous to indulge the sweeter romanticism of songs such as “The Eyes To Cry” and “Prevert’s Song”, where Gainsbourg’s musing on the poet’s work prompts a moving reflection on transitory love.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s a mismatch overall between the angry observations and the pell-mell pop-rock riffing of tracks such as “Cannons” and “One More Last Song”, so eager to curry favour and cajole us into singalong hooks.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Carter Girl reaffirms Carlene Carter’s role as scion of country music’s leading family through a mixture of Carter Family classics and original material, plus shaky duets with Kris Kristofferson and Willie Nelson.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Large parts of it still rely too heavily on a dour combination of industry and portent.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though obviously sincere and heartfelt, Gregory Porter’s tribute to his greatest influence falls a touch short in some cases. His voice, while smooth and warm, lacks the silky, creamy timbre of Cole’s on “Mona Lisa”, and on some songs he sounds more like Kurt Elling or Sammy Davis Jr.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Whatever his anxieties, it’s never less than gently engaging.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While it's pleasantly effected for the most part, it's hard to get involved in someone else's nostalgia.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The brittle garage-punk of this debut positively seethes with trebly guitars, reedy organs, waspish fuzzboxes and urgent drums, with singer Mike Brandon exploring the ramifications of titles like “What Happens When You Turn The Devil Down” and “Flowers In My Hair, Demons In My Head” in tortuous, passionate manner.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Their minimalist aesthetic can sometimes work against them, as on the spartan, diffident “The Pop Life”, but it’s tempered by a winning romanticism on “Butterflies”, where the fluttering keyboards evoke a fantasy of a dead soul becoming a butterfly, one of “a thousand souls swarming”.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Along with the anger and regret comes the usual hip-hop baggage of aggrandisement, recrimination and old-school reminiscence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    [A] more thoughtful, diverse creations in which floating organ and mellotron lend a wavering melancholy to songs like “Maybe We’ll Drown” and “Lemon Memory”, pierced by contrasting guitar rages of keening angularity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's not all suddenly-grown-up rock music, of course, with tracks like “No Control” and “Fool's Gold” retaining the boys' perky teen-pop charm; and whatever style is adopted, the choruses are all reassuringly collective singalongs.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sun
    On [Cat Power] Marshall has changed direction yet again, abandoning her soul charm for something much less appealing.... But her natural grace shines through on "3, 6, 9"... and "Ruin."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Scott's overly melodramatic delivery sometimes gets in the way of the words, although his arrangements are for the most part respectful and apt.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    His guests include Lana Del Rey, whose affectless manner makes her a perfect match for him; though the best grooves here come courtesy of Daft Punk, bookending the album with the scudding title-track and Michael Jackson homage “I Feel It Coming”.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Actor Maxine Peake delivers the combination of historical narrative and polemic in her blackest-pudding accent, over a gamelan tinkle of synth tones and string synths that evoke the blend of grit and gentrification now surrounding these events.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ironically, though, it’s the more old-school tracks that furnish the highlights.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    BE
    Though marginally better than its predecessor, BE can in no sense be considered a progression.