The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 1,318 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Skin
Lowest review score: 20 The Awakening
Score distribution:
1318 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fanfare offers a classy rumination on modern values--albeit something of a conundrum, in being perhaps the most sophisticated celebration of simplicity ever recorded.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So long as you're not paying close attention, it's a beguiling enough experience.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result may be the band’s best album yet, one on which they come closer than ever.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unsurprisingly, his vocals are the most appealing aspect of the album, with the emotional strength of his lead lines supported by subtle harmonies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bovelle’s dub skills ensure there’s depth and disturbance in the band’s angry bricolages of whines, whirrs and harsh, stabbing guitars dancing around Mark Stewart’s edgy, political caterwauling on tracks like “Instant Halo” and “Pure Ones”, while Shocklee cooks up a bulldozer funk maelstrom of splintering sounds for “Burn Your Flag” and “City Of Eyes”.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The standard dips slightly in the later stages, but the grooves throughout are sleek and snappy, and CeeLo himself has rarely sounded better.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ironically, given its disillusioned tone, After the Disco offers welcome confirmation of the vast and varied terrain available to pop and rock when it dares stray away from the mainstream or merely contemporary.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Drawing on the embattled, hopeful possibilities of early Seventies soul, rock and folk, its chamber-classical and folk instrumentation allows for pleasure as well as despair. This is a Radiohead album to make you feel, better.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Grasscut push the electropop envelope in intriguing new directions with Unearth, its songs inspired by alliances of people, poetry and places.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gently marching strings furnish an aptly martial underscoring for the conflict imagery of “Treaty”, the latest of Cohen’s romantic mea culpas, which reveals how, for a Great Seducer, love is an essentially narcissistic, even solipsistic, pastime, its protagonist apologising “for that ghost I made you be”. It’s just one of several sharp, stinging twists casting new and unusual shadows on old themes in You Want It Darker, culminating in the mordant, bitter advice of “Steer Your Way.”
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Switching smoothly between contemporary classical orchestrations, big-band jazz and operatic chorale, the results are frequently breathtaking in their audacity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's gimmicky, sure, but also pretty irresistible.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The tone here is more robust than [Pull Up Some Dust and Sit Down's] thoughtful reflections on history and poverty, taking its cue rather from the ribald pillorying of conservatives in tracks like "No Banker Left Behind" and "I Want My Crown".
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A late-career lapse into gimmicky covers of “Silent Night” and “Can Can” aside, this compilation is a marvellous confirmation of pop’s fringe possibilities.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Trip-hop pioneers Morcheeba continue to broaden their approach on Head Up High, incorporating dancehall, dubstep and rock elements into grooves informed by European soundtrack/library music. Remarkably, they still keep it infectious.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's easily the best work Diddy's been involved with in his entire career.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For a while on this overlong album, he brings something new to the usual hip-hop parade of brandy and bitches, lasciviousness and loyalty.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The raging country-punk counterblast “Country” unleashes her disgust at the country establishment’s backward attitude towards women. Elsewhere, her sympathies remain firmly with the downtrodden and desperate, as in her straight-talking depiction of teen pressures faced in “High School”, a bruised parade of class clowns and cheerleaders, pep pills and pregnancy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Former Hüsker Dü drummer/songwriter Grant Hart exhibits huge ambition on The Argument.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Weeknd weasels his way queasily into unprotected affections under cover of arrangements whose dark, miasmic synth tones and itchy, sludgy rhythms blend the apparently conflicting worlds of R&B and industrial new-wave.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's beautifully presented in an absorbing blend of acoustic guitar, piano, cello, and the occasional tint of vibes or ambient colouration.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An absorbing, intermittently amusing album.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Apocalypse is Bill Callahan's best release in some while, sustaining a unity and intimacy of mood throughout.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Singer Julie Baenziger, aka Julie Ann Bee, whose debut album reveals a similar mix of emotional openness and affinity for the natural world as Laura Veirs, with something of Veirs's inquistive approach to musical textures, too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It offers an engagement with the notion of music as a lived obsession that far outstrips their mostly meagre intentions.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Few musicians ever achieve such complete dominance and superiority on their instrument as Jerry Douglas: not a single voice is raised in challenge to Douglas's mastery of the dobro. This latest, guest-laden album shows why.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mogwai's score for the French TV series Les Revenants places certain restrictions on the band's style which, it must be said, work to their advantage.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thankfully, Burn Something Beautiful confirms his own fund of creativity is far from drained, the collaboration with Buck and McCaughey resulting in all three’s best work in years.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Americana is the kind of concept album that Bernie Taupin might have written for Elton John; but being Ray Davies, it’s not so much comprised of fond, mythopoeic imaginings as the more specific (non-political) relationship that still subsists between Britain and America.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An artful yet unschooled prospect to reckon with.