The Line of Best Fit's Scores

  • Music
For 2,220 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 28% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 OK Computer: OKNOTOK 1997-2017
Lowest review score: 30 Sheezus
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 2220
2220 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a collection that displays consistently and rigorously the undervalued, underexposed talent of one of the country’s best post-Ray Davies songwriters and one that, despite its length and sometimes haphazard nature is a fitting milestone to this prolific, profound and playful master of the songwriting form.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Ooz is a meandering, disorientating trip through punk, ska, jazz and hip hop--held together by Marshall’s menacing vocal sneer.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The truth is that they are both thoughtful, sometimes sentimental musicians, with voices that can sing of love and hurt just as much as eating croissants (“Continental Breakfast”) or friendly girls who insist on touching your face (“Untogether”)--and this is delightful.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Weather Station is a model example of expanding an act’s sound without losing sight of what made them great to begin with.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Ultimately, MASSEDUCTION defies explanation and critique, rendering the critic a dead weight in the dust of its ever-accelerating sucker-punch of ideas.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    It certainly sounds very much like the record he wanted to make, and nothing like anything he's done previously.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Interestingly the relationship described in Tenderness is between Standell and a new lover, which you would expect to be a difficult topic for Blue Hawaii to collaborate on, but they are alarmingly mature in the way they support each other on this musical project.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [2015’s The Pale Emperor] was the most revitalised he had sounded in years. That energy hasn’t flagged an inch on Heaven Upside Down.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The band’s strongest set of songs to date. Between the increased production, the reaching-slightly-too-far aspiration, and sharper focus, AYP comes closest to fulfilling the promise shown since Citizen’s inception.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The sense of place that Yumi Zouma finally seems to have found on Willowbank brings an album that’s bristling with energy, albeit one that does feel overstuffed. And yet, even in the face of that, it’s hard not to be swept away by Willowbank.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This weepy and emotive record will probably be glued to many turntables; the ideal soundtrack to a morning coffee.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Acetone may have preferred to follow the silent way, but they were the strong, silent types, which makes the contents of 1992 – 2001 resonate so strongly now.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    V
    V isn’t a huge reinvention, more a subtle reboot, and a move which has worked out perfectly. The Horrors are hardly new to making brilliant albums--they did that with their previous three--but V is better than them all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For ultimately, in true Almond fashion, this musical nod to 1960’s Italian cinema is as much tragedy as comedy. The real tragedy however would be not to check it out.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By its end, Thrice Woven not only serves as one of this year’s most promising metal releases, but it also stands as something purely monolithic and even transcendental--a collection of songs, showcasing a band’s evolution that leaves you in full levitation, locked in paralysis, and at a moment’s notice, you dissipate completely wondering how you made it home.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    They feel more effective now that they’ve found a way to write as a focused beam rather than a eclectic lineup of individual musicians, and long-term followers will be thrilled by the album’s back half, which retains their well-established experimental bent.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Desire is the sound of a group who have thoroughly found themselves and sees them standing supremely confident, whilst retaining elements of older material including “Wonderful Life” and “Miracle”. Seemingly, 2017 is the year of the upbeat indie dance record, and it belongs to Hurts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Each sophisticated melody and harmony may seem jarring and sometimes uncomfortable--as is the way with jazz music--but underneath the spiritual solos and out-there notes, there is a simple, familiar sound--and here lies the beauty of the Harmony Of Difference.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ash
    This message of positivity, strength and optimism is one that is weaved throughout each track on their new album Ash.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    While it satisfies the need to move around and proclomate, the end result of V proves hapless as well as frustrating to see because the Bronx have an immeasurable amount of talent--it’s just too bad that this far in, they haven’t managed to harness it entirely and create something more monumental.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The magnifying glass is on everything with this release, and it results in something distinguished and quite frankly mammoth.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Bereft of any shine or polish, Aromanticism is a piercing debut collection of songs of remarkable intensity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s sonic homogeneity lends it an air of sameness at first blush, but the details burrow their way out on subsequent listens; the guitar work, in particular, offers fleeting doses of delightfully understated melodicism to counterpoint the slow industrial grind beneath.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their quality of music and precision is outstanding, and while referencing so many of our favourite artists from eras been and gone, they perform and compose in a new light with such integrity that makes them a step above the rest.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album drifts by comfortably and could benefit from a few surprises, both tonally and musically. However, there are definite standout moments, such as “Oh Oh” and the bouncy “Angel”.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In the end, Ununiform has it's peaks and valleys.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    where Neuroplasiticy brilliantly built on Cold Specks' debut and breathed life into every track, Fool’s Paradise excels at singular moments and seems to struggle for air and space overall.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Ultimately Mulvey’s record is once again intriguing, engaging and diverse. A record that is equally accessible and rewarding on multiple listens, the softer side of pop can take plenty more of Nick Mulvey's music.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Strange Peace, Metz have created an album that still largely has one foot rooted in the best of their past, but sees the other stretching forward into a future that is just as riotous.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite such intense themes, the record manages to stay light and joyful, revelling in the potential that music and dance possess to draw communities together and find resolution.