The Line of Best Fit's Scores

  • Music
For 2,220 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 28% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Melodrama
Lowest review score: 30 Montage Of Heck: The Home Recordings
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 2220
2220 music reviews
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    These unreleased tracks are a nice glimpse behind Prince’s purple curtain, and provide a tantalizing hint at the potential treasures that await us within his Vault. But a discerning ear will easily identify why these songs didn’t quite make the cut for the soundtrack and remained locked away for so long. ... The original Purple Rain soundtrack, however, still sounds fresh, vital, and impassioned.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While they aren’t designed to make pop bangers, they clearly have an ear for the kind of instrumentation and production tricks that enable them to cut to the feeling much faster than naked piano. Let’s hope the future holds a bit more exuberance and a bit less niceness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Soft Sound From Another Planet, Michelle Zauner has moved beyond mourning to a solace far more celestial, communicating her grief through these poignant musical prayers aimed directly at the heavens and beyond.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There’s nothing quite as personal as digging through someone’s record collection and God First feels almost exactly like that. From funk and soul to chilled out electronica, the entire spectrum of Steadman’s eclectic record collection has been mined here.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ke$ha too reaches for a savage base pull, lifting from the low-end, high-reward arena rock spectrum, a place of soaring peaks and valleys that still float above heads even at their most subdued, music meant to be blasted from towering stacks of speakers, so the stage appears bookended by the Willis Tower and the John Hancock Center and that finds its artistic beauty in the sheer size and ferocity of its scope and emotional appeal.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mura Masa isn’t perfect, with his production sometimes losing its identity to his guest stars, but it’s a solid and most importantly fun debut for a real rising star.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Ultimately Need To Feel Your Love is an unashamedly retro flavoured affair, but it's one that’s worth tasting.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Thin Black Duke isn’t their finest album--for my money, that’d have to be 1995’s Steve Albini-produced Let Me Be A Woman--but it’s still one of the most thrilling, galvanising records I’ve heard in recent months.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    In Hug Of Thunder, Broken Social Scene have managed to master the balance between spiky energy, tender melody and a singular knack for carving out a soaring chorus. Hug Of Thunder has undoubtedly been a long time coming, but it has unequivocally been worth the wait.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Though melodically not as rich as his previous offerings, Boo Boo is just as considered and stylistically coherent as you would expect from a Toro Y Moi record, which, given that it was born out of an identity crisis, is a continued testament to its creator.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is yet another reinvention for Crutchfield, but this is the first time she’s so palpably given off the sense that she’s at peace with her own thoughts: stronger and more candid for having figured out how to best to take care of herself.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Algiers crafted a unified, cautiously optimistic record that rises above the vitriolic din.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    4:44 offers renewed hope for fans who, since Kingdom Come, have felt increasingly disenfranchised by Jay-Z’s loss of touch with his roots and apparent marginalisation of his rap career.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The actual content of OKNOTOK, in terms of what’s new, is hardly justification for any casual listener to pick it up, but the excuse to revisit the record itself would absolutely vindicate the purchase.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ruinism does, at times, often feel more like an experiment than a cohesive whole; a criticism sometimes levelled at Lynch. ... And yet, there’s something about Ruinism that sucks you into its world. It’s beauty amid chaos and it’s easy to let your inhibitions go and just fall into it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A Walk With Love and Death re-frames the Melvins’ legacy with newfound aplomb. Whilst perhaps unlikely to win over anyone sitting on the fence up until now this is not merely their most impressively realised effort in many a moon, but also one of the most rewarding listens of the year thus far.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    As an entry level to this magnificent band, this more than suffices.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Going it alone might not have been the most obvious next step for Pierce, however he has managed to maintain a catchy and consistent sound that justifies that decision.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Though Dust often feels like it’s dreaming, you’re nevertheless consistently reminded of its complexity and Halo’s deep cognisance of the musical language.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Murder is hellishly dark, terminally weird and subsequently very funny.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    On Melodrama, Lorde invites all of us to join in her anguished party of the damned, convincing her believers that if we just keep on dancing the ills of the world won’t be able to catch up to us. And for now, that is a faith promising enough to get totally lost in.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    On this record it is clear that Staples is making his own assertive artistic statement for these turbulent times, while also firmly establishing himself as one of the brash, singular voices that is going to be leading the music world into the chaotic, unpredictable future.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For Ride to produce such a strong album is a wonderful thing. To compare this to their first two albums is silly--bands and entire genres were formed off the back of those records--but does Weather Diaries sit up there with them? Absolutely.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The record is a fluid blend of Goldie taking reflective looks back on where he’s come from and the myriad influences that have shaped him over the years, alongside a sonic perfectionist’s competitive desire to push the music world forward with his new work.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the eclectic genre-hopping, all of Résistance ends up sounding unmistakably and thrillingly like Songhoy Blues.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The production is perfection, and if you're in to classic pop musical cliches that defined electronic music in that era, Iteration becomes more of a celebration of nostalgia than perhaps a narrative into something deeper. The trip back is kind of fun, even if it is not directly intended.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    2017 has had better pop records surely, but hearing Halsey grow as an artist is a uniquely rewarding experience that makes the album’s faults more forgivable and its successes more thrilling.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    City Music is, without fail, one of the most quintessential albums of the year so far.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Gossip may currently be no more, but with Ditto's solo album, we have a replacement that fills the void.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The album works best when you bear in mind the turbulent times that inspired it. Ti Amo has a romantic heart, and Phoenix use it to find the bright spots in a tragic world, without losing sight of the tragedy itself.