The New York Times' Scores

For 1,595 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not
Lowest review score: 10 All The Right Reasons
Score distribution:
1,595 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all its determined optimism That Lucky Old Sun ends up as more an affirmation of Mr. Wilson’s legacy than an expansion of it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ms. Simpson has a strong voice, but it has little nuance, rendering her exercises in self-empowerment particularly banal.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This isn’t natural territory for Kings of Leon, and it often shows. At times the band seems content to channel the monumental sweep of U2.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It sounds so good; really, it sounds better than it is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Mr. Jerkins has returned as the main producer, and the sentiments of the songs, whether self-affirming or heartbroken, are back to generic ones.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s a lot about Ultraviolet you might want to like. But it runs more on concept rather than talent; too often it feels self-conscious and low on hooks.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Common Existence is the least pungent and immediate Thursday album since its debut. In places it sounds like an experiment, sometimes a successful one.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    That Mr. Owen rarely sounds out of place is a testament to his mutable, honeyed voice, but also to his fundamental blankness, meaning he rises and falls with the mode he chooses to adopt. And when he chooses poorly, it stings.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The new environment rejuvenates Mr. Cornell for good and bad: he sounds shallower than he was before but pithier too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It all feels tasteful, companionable and often saggingly dull. Perhaps a steelier singer could use this much gauze; for Ms. Peyroux, it’s Vaseline on the camera lens.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A palatable but undistinguished batch of slow- to medium-tempo R&B fare.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Not once does Flo Rida overpower his reference points, making him a rarity: an entertainer wholly without ego, a phantom presence on his own songs.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If Crocodiles revel in a strain of insolence too familiar to feel transgressive, the band also manages some catchy choruses and efficient low-fi landscapes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If she's sweating, though, it's not audible. As per usual Ciara, a singer who prizes rhythm over texture and technical fluency, can't do much to outmaneuver the beats, which are consistently inventive here.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    His new album, Further Complications--musically more immediate, lyrically more beleaguered--was engineered by Steve Albini, whose aesthetics dictate big drums, big guitars and small vocals. So Mr. Cocker is shouting to be heard, which only improves on his comic persona.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This album, the band’s seventh, feels familiar in structure, packed with the usual two-minute bursts of aggression. But it’s improbably weighty and ponderous and unusually slow moving for a band that specializes in gnashing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Yet while the album includes its share of blandly pleasant songs--the kind that could position Ms. Avi as a less arty Feist--there are also glints of melancholy clarity that promise more.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Here were two artists, anxious and passionate, who knew how to talk to each other. That connection is missing from much of the rest of this collection, an exercise in Rolodex-flexing and loose oversight.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ginuwine’s new material uses a more generic palette of sounds from R&B slow jams and gospel. There’s more song to them, more piano-ballad chords and swirling Isley Brothers guitars, and more mediocrity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Cradlesong, his second persistently polite, numbingly polished solo album.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The cuts are manic psychedelic jams--there’s even a sitar--riding electronic drones and throbbing, insistent riffs. Timbres of instruments are barbed with fuzz tone and static; the voices that infrequently appear might be shouting unintelligibly or nearly buried in the mix.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    So let’s file Voltaic, released by Nonesuch a couple of weeks ago, under the category of Things We Didn’t Think We Needed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On Keep On Loving You, her spotty 25th studio album, her voice still has that slightly nasal quality that makes it sound always on the edge of a harangue, even though she rarely bares her fangs anymore.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The uptempo songs on Turning the Mind suggest disco that’s been hollowed out and confined to a solitary outpost, where Mr. Chapman has only his isolation to sustain him.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    No amount of hackneyed songwriting can undermine Ms. Underwood’s voice, which is consistently impressive, capable of pneumatic thrusts. It enlivens plenty of moments here.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    But even while Mr. Bon Jovi is sympathizing with the common man, the scrape in his voice is never wrenching. And while the arrangements are mildly darker than on the group’s previous albums, this group is still drawn magnetically to swelling choruses, its ambition of scale still grander than its ambition of import.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s a seamless continuation of his “Idol” run, full of gentle songs that he only rarely tries to rough up. The flattening of the recording process suits him well.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He still commands the discipline, skills and microphone presence he brought to hip-hop in the 1980s. But if he’s only going to get around to releasing one album per decade, it should be more than a holding action.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Just Like You is a workmanlike pop album with shrewdly punky touches, like a ready-made outfit from the mall chain Hot Topic. It flatters Ms. Iraheta as a singer but too often suggests other empowered female stars, like Pink or Brandi Carlile or Kelly Clarkson.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    But all that queenliness, and the sameness of the tempo, start to wear you down. It's not until the 10th track, "Put It in a Love Song," that the record starts to bristle with a less regal impulse: flirting.