The New York Times' Scores

For 1,557 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Get Behind Me Satan
Lowest review score: 10 All The Right Reasons
Score distribution:
1,557 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The songs on Wild Young Hearts are well written, and the band is tight. They put me in the mind of Earl Greyhound, those three-piece sets that really work.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Set ’Em Wild, Set ’Em Free, the band has produced something practical, with less clutter, and many times better.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The output of Isis, a Los Angeles band often filed under the subcategory of post-metal, upholds a deliberative truce between brute physicality and moody rumination. Wavering Radiant, the group’s impressive new album, satisfies both sides in a way that suggests a balance of prior achievements.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The fabulously snotty attitude, the melodic wit, the rhymes that tend toward glossolalia: yes, Cam’ron has returned to form.
    • The New York Times
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    White Rabbits favor physical instruments over electronic abstractions, and the drums kick the music toward an American sound that fortifies its brains with muscle.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a fragile recollection of California rock from more auspicious times, with stately melodies and vocal chorales over jerry-built foundations: elegies for vanished certainties.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is a blast of nostalgia that doesn’t sound bitter or even particularly dated.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'You' in this case is a placeholder for Mr. Richie’s core demographic, which skews overwhelmingly female, and generally older than any of his kids. But if that makes Just Go a textbook adult-contemporary album, it also lends credible emotional footing to the songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So here’s a Sonic Youth record in which Ms. Gordon sings all the best stuff.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Words are secondary for Sunn O))), a k a Greg Anderson on bass and Stephen O’Malley on guitar, who long ago made thunderous resonant sounds their stock in trade. What’s striking about this new release is its wealth of additional textures: woodwinds, brass, strings, male and female choirs.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a bit out of focus, perhaps intentionally. Made with his new band, Us Five, it’s sketchy, groovy and a little burdensome.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The panache of the singing, and the radiant complexity of the music--an achievement shared by Mr. Rodriguez Lopez and a handful of regular collaborators, including the Red Hot Chili Peppers guitarist John Frusciante--drive the album relentlessly forward. And it’s the subtle touches, no less than the sweeping ones, that leave an impression.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For most of the album the band reveals new levels of craftsmanship and detail, mastering one unexpected style after another, mostly from the 1970s and ’80s: house, disco, funk, T. Rex glam, synth-pop. After the surprise wears off, the hooks of the songs linger.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Battlefield, her expertly constructed second album, upholds a darker, more experienced tone without losing an ounce of melodrama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All together it makes for an often sumptuous debut album of lithe, modern coffeehouse soul (in senses musical and literal: Hear Music is a joint venture between Starbucks and Concord Music Group) that smartly avoids the bohemian.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their new album, Destination Tokyo, casts a spell in unpolished ways, evoking a gritty hybrid of Krautrock, dance-rock and art-punk.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His identity crisis, drinking binges and family tensions are chronicled in chunky, rootsy rockers that can be stately or foot-stomping--and can, perhaps, offer some resolution.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Red
    Originality, nostalgia, sincerity, camp--none of these are stable elements in Datarock’s world, which may explain why Red comes across as well as it does.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The five-piece ensemble handles each tune with soulful aplomb.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It doesn’t reflect a lack of evolution, or even a regression, but rather the completion of a circle--and probably a landing pad, even as the world continues to whiz by.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Resistance, the crispest Muse album yet, is unapologetically and ambitiously beautiful.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The songs stay bright, friendly and generalized yet heartfelt, awaiting the singalongs they invite in Ms. Furtado’s latest language.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a set of 11 concise songs in 37 minutes that are mostly fast, loud, sinewy and live sounding.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Central Market, Mr. Braxton’s first full album under his own name in seven years, he has moved forward with exponentially more complicated music. It’s exponentially more entertaining, too.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She still needs every ounce of her pluck on an album with a gloss-to-grit ratio more or less congruent with mainstream country norms. But with her keenly stalwart voice, she’s the picture of self-possession, secure enough to admit to the occasional misgiving.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Together [with producer Rob Cavallo] they broadened the band’s dynamics without sacrificing momentum.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Michael Buble is a master at juggling musical attitudes, and his new CD, Crazy Love, whose title comes from the Van Morrison song, is his most confident balancing act yet.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    John Eatherly’s almost never in her way, though: she’s pugnacious and razor-sharp right from the outset of this often terrific, and sometimes surprising album.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Amerie’s raw voice, blunt lyrics and rhythmic ingenuity make “In Love & War” a designer knockoff that at times rivals the original.