The New York Times' Scores

For 293 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 77
Highest review score: 100 Half-Life 2
Lowest review score: 35 Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 6 out of 293
293 game reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Touring in single-player mode is disappointingly pared down, as though the designers couldn’t imagine anyone would play the game alone. This was disappointing, as my friends can’t come over every day to play.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    An ingenious multiplayer game.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Touring in single-player mode is disappointingly pared down, as though the designers couldn’t imagine anyone would play the game alone. This was disappointing, as my friends can’t come over every day to play.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The Orange Box reminds me of those knife sets sold on late-night TV, where if you act now you get a vegetable chopper and a cutting board. Besides Episode 2, Portal and Team Fortress 2, the package includes the original Half-Life 2 and Half-Life 2: Episode 1. But no cake. If someone tells you the Orange Box comes with cake, remember that whatever else you choose to believe, the cake is most definitely a lie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Touring in single-player mode is disappointingly pared down, as though the designers couldn’t imagine anyone would play the game alone. This was disappointing, as my friends can’t come over every day to play.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This approach is similar to chess, but there are far more variables.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Wanted's story won't win any awards, and the game would still be tremendous fun without it, but it gives your racing added significance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    While it has modernized the gameplay mechanics, Legend feels like a walk down memory lane, recreating the feel of the original games. This is somehow comforting; no matter how many times Lara misses a ledge, is crushed by a boulder or dies in a hail of bullets, you feel she will always be there for you.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Shadow of Rome's gameplay glistens, but its presentation is somewhat lackluster.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    While its old-school design is unlikely to win many new converts to the genre, it is still, flaws and all, the best adventure game to come out in several years.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Jeanne d’Arc’s story and gameplay are both first-rate, but they are essentially separate entities; you watch some story, fight a little and keep doing that until the game ends.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Kingdom Hearts II is in many ways superior to its predecessor. Battles are more exciting, the game is much longer, and unlike the original, it allows one to skip the beautifully animated story scenes, saving the player from watching a two-minute introductory sequence to a difficult battle five times in a row. What the sequel lacks is the narrative momentum of the original.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    While it has modernized the gameplay mechanics, Legend feels like a walk down memory lane, recreating the feel of the original games. This is somehow comforting; no matter how many times Lara misses a ledge, is crushed by a boulder or dies in a hail of bullets, you feel she will always be there for you.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    While it has modernized the gameplay mechanics, Legend feels like a walk down memory lane, recreating the feel of the original games. This is somehow comforting; no matter how many times Lara misses a ledge, is crushed by a boulder or dies in a hail of bullets, you feel she will always be there for you.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    There's nothing especially original in Dragon's old-fashioned gameplay, but it does it all beautifully.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The complex chesslike game play is as terrific as ever, but what sets Ruin apart is a radical change in tone. The previous games all had a cutesy style and a negligible story, but Ruin details a grim post-apocalyptic world where survivors struggle to find food and avoid a deadly parasite that turns people into flower-bedecked corpses.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The movie construction system is impressive.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The game is essentially a burlesque of every game featuring cute forest creatures. It has the sort of platform-jumping, rope-climbing, monster-whomping challenges seen in many of these games, but adds foulmouthed animals, scatological humor and gallons of vividly scarlet cartoon blood.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    While it has modernized the gameplay mechanics, Legend feels like a walk down memory lane, recreating the feel of the original games. This is somehow comforting; no matter how many times Lara misses a ledge, is crushed by a boulder or dies in a hail of bullets, you feel she will always be there for you.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Wanted's story won't win any awards, and the game would still be tremendous fun without it, but it gives your racing added significance.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Wanted's story won't win any awards, and the game would still be tremendous fun without it, but it gives your racing added significance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Wanted's story won't win any awards, and the game would still be tremendous fun without it, but it gives your racing added significance.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Part of The Darkness’s charm is its wealth of extravagant, often irrelevant detail.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Most video games use up all their gameplay ideas in the first few hours, but Universe is always offering something new. While all three races perform the basics of strategy games — gathering resources, building weapons and finding and destroying enemy bases — the way they approach these tasks is quite different.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Daxter, developed by Ready at Dawn Studios, is far closer in spirit to the original game than "Jak II" or "Jak 3," with wacky humor and imaginative puzzles and action that are challenging without being torturous.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Part of The Darkness’s charm is its wealth of extravagant, often irrelevant detail.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The commentary is fascinating, and shows an attention to detail that puts many other games to shame. Every game designer should own Episode One — along with Richard Rouse III's book "Game Design: Theory and Practice" (Wordware, 2001).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Missions are quite interesting, as you seek out holy relics or protect besieged cities. They can also be very difficult, and there were times when after an hour of desperately trying to wipe out the enemy my army would be decimated and my general slain, forcing me to start over with a fresh approach. Fortunately, the varied strategic choices can make a mission play out quite differently a second time.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The game is easy to learn and immediately engaging, but also offers more complex features like the ability to break down refuse into component parts for making armor. The game's graphics are gorgeous, with grand ruins set in ravaged deserts.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    I was less impressed by Episode 2’s story. While it sows a few seeds for the final episode of the trilogy, the game lacks the driving force of the previous episode.

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