The New York Times' Scores

For 1,623 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not
Lowest review score: 10 All The Right Reasons
Score distribution:
1,623 music reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Be Your Own Pet" is smart and crafty, but most of all, it's a wild-eyed blast.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Imagine the Postal Service, but far more danceable and quirkily experimental.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Loose" is an addictive, deceptively lightweight album of electronic pop; at different points it evokes Janet Jackson, M.I.A., Gwen Stefani and Gnarls Barkley. [19 Jun 2006]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is a perfect introduction for latecomers to this essential New York band.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Angst has rarely sounded sweeter than it does on "Ganging Up on the Sun," which swirls with classic vocal harmonies, vintage organs and lightly strummed guitars.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mr. Mayer has been writing songs again, good ones, with all the leanness and directness that distinguish his strongest work.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album has a kind of demented gravity, and the music bears it out: it is the most concentrated, focused Slayer record in 20 years.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [A] darkly intelligent album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Blood Mountain" is a strong record by a powerful band nearing an ideal of cohesion.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Los Lobos has swerved away from the upbeat music it plays on the jam-band circuit, harking back to its quietly startling 1992 album, “Kiko.” [25 Sep 2006]
    • The New York Times
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Another warm, gentle album, one that should attract Norah Jones fans and Trisha Yearwood fans alike. [9 Oct 2006]
    • The New York Times
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here’s the thing about Nas’s old-fashioned approach to hip-hop: It still works.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ce
    He’s still singing with his usual soft, focused concentration, and in the rough textures and gaping silences of the band are strong melodies that point back to his simpler records from the mid-’70s, like “Qualquer Coisa” and “Joia.” Embedded in it too are some of Mr. Veloso’s best lyrics of the last 20 years. [22 Jan 2007]
    • The New York Times
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A wonderfully time-twisted batch of songs. [12 Mar 2007]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    “I’ll Sleep When You’re Dead” feels simultaneously futuristic, anachronistic and of the moment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Often delirious but never silly, “Out of the Woods” cleverly upends clichés about what grown-up pop should sound like. [19 Mar 2007]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It sounds terrific, in a turbulent fashion. [9 Apr 2007]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A remarkably beautiful elegy. [26 Feb 2007]
    • The New York Times
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The new songs are more melodic and even more meticulous than before.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A message to lapsed Tori Amos fans: come back. You won’t be bored.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Voxtrot’s self-titled debut album is marvelous: a collection of 11 tightly coiled songs, loud and fast and sweet.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Backed by ragged, loud guitar work and production that is full but not slick, Ms. Lambert sounds like a brash rabble-rouser, an emotionally insightful spark plug. [29 Apr 2007]
    • The New York Times
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is brilliant on its own terms: a party record with no fixed strategy, one that wiggles out of all responsibilities to the partier.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On this album he decisively shakes off the enervation and jokey detachment that made the Queens’ last few albums sound like in-jokes. This time Mr. Homme hones his songs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is focused — read: not insanely self-indulgent — in a way that recalls albums of his like “Heartbreaker” and “Gold."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Curtis seems surprisingly modest. The album is neither as contagious as "Get Rich or Die Tryin'" (apparently it's possible to have an entire album stuck in your head) nor as devious as "The Massacre."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is an indie-rock album that sounds mysterious without being diffident or difficult, without piling on the noise or retreating into whimsy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Matt Sherrod on drums, Crowded House sounds like its old self (and like Mr. Finn’s solo efforts).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s still a short, sharp shock: 10 songs, with no shortage of vehemence.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks to a keen sense of proportion and concision--and the unmannered integrity of Ms. Vega’s singing style--the album isn’t ponderous.