The New York Times' Scores

For 1,563 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Office (UK): Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 739
  2. Negative: 0 out of 739
739 tv reviews
  1. Blue Bloods has an old-fashioned appeal both as drama in the vein of a workingman's "Dynasty" and as splashy procedural.
  2. Whatever you might think of the group’s beliefs and belligerence, these sailors give great sound bites.
  3. It has one of the most talented actresses on television as its lead, and yet over all Nurse Jackie is surprisingly, and disconcertingly, off key. This is a drama draped in black humor that doesn’t know when to be funny.
  4. It’s an enjoyable, straightforward espionage tale without a lot of twists or extra layers.
  5. Lots of amusing cameos add to the fun.... Mr. Gaffigan may not be the greatest actor, but he has a genial charm, which is the first prerequisite to making a show like this work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like so much British science fiction, especially Douglas Adams's "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" series, this "Doctor Who" has a goofy, homemade quality; it's less interested in gizmos than in characters.
  6. Beautifully shot and sublimely silly, Sense8 is slower than “The Matrix” and not nearly as thrilling.
  7. The premiere episode tends to lapse into a "You go, girl" mode typical of shallow treatments of disability, with fist-pumping and treacly background music.
  8. Though the show is a drama, it is served up with a droll comic sensibility that is a refreshing change.
  9. Icy-dry satire laced with moments of farce and inspired lunacy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Bronx Is Burning succeeds because of the mutually-assured-destruction brand of combustibility among its lead characters - there is something of “Barbarians at the Gate” in the gleeful madness of the Yankees plot - and because of the incidents that the writers and director choose to recreate.
  10. 'Unscripted' is a small thing, but it has funny and clever moments. [7 Jan 2005]
    • The New York Times
  11. Limitless retains the flippant style of the movie, especially in Brian’s voice-overs, which distinguishes it from many of the others. The guy is a mega-genius, but he’s a likable one.
  12. The half-hour Juarez, on Monday night, is a bracing, at times mesmerizing introduction to the Witness series.... The subsequent films are each an hour long, and while all have powerful material, particularly the South Sudan chapter, they're also more diffuse and more prone to sentimentality about the violence and social disorder the photojournalists bear witness to.
  13. Would You Rather ...? With Graham Norton on BBC America proves that a fair amount of fun can be generated simply by putting people in chairs and letting them crack wise.
  14. These images will stick with you. But so will an overall sense that Frozen Planet is more--a lot more--of the same: an aestheticized, sentimentalized, anthropomorphic abstraction of the natural world, in which gentle soundtrack music, winsome narration (by Alec Baldwin, replacing Mr. Attenborough for most of the American version) and the judicious use of slow motion combine to put us in a pleasant stupor on the couch.
  15. Things could go either way. If Mr. Endicott, Mr. Stoddard and their colleagues can exercise more consistent quality control, there might be another round of financing in their future.
  16. As might be expected with any Gary David Goldberg product, Spin City is smart stuff. The one-liners zing, Mr. Fox and company are disarming and the 22 minutes flow by effortlessly. The only snag is that concept of spin. Are those who toy with the truth all that funny?
  17. When Zach is performing for the cameras, he’s hammy verging on pathetic, as if he’s starring not in a reality show but a sketch-comedy show about someone with deep feelings of inadequacy..... He’s at his most personable and affectionate when he thinks he’s shooed away the cameras, which are of course still filming, in a more vérité style.
  18. The story is not surprising--almost every turn seems obvious and a little hackneyed--but it is surprisingly enjoyable.
  19. Clerk Terryn Buxton is the seemingly unsuspecting source of most of the show's laughs....He's also the avenue for the note of moral reproof that inevitably seeps into what is a mostly straightforward show.
  20. This Good Marty/Bad Marty dynamic may prove more fruitful for the show in the long run than the well-worn punching bag that is corporate America.
  21. [A] low-key but charming NBC comedy.
  22. An often entertaining series.
  23. "Threshold" holds back more than it reveals, and that is the right contingency plan for a successful science fiction thriller.
  24. The show has a disarming matter-of-factness that, combined with premium-cable production values, makes it easy to watch.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Played straight, it would surely be tiresome. But presented as an off-kilter spoof, and draped around a winningly drawn central character, the premise has promise.
  25. The series is bold in its candor and unhurried attention to detail, but not quite brave enough to lay bare the bleakest, pettiest injuries that can scar a marriage.
  26. It’s acutely intelligent, luxuriously dressed and well acted across the board. It’s also notably serious and quiet, despite the occasional beheading or session on the rack required by a tale.... [But] the emotional and psychological underpinnings of the narrative don’t resonate as strongly as its ideas about history and governance.
  27. The ending mars what is otherwise a handsome and well-written effort, with good supporting performances.
  28. The Casual Vacancy is more interesting than it is enjoyable, an unsparing look at the reality of English country life, not the reverie.
  29. Some of the jokes work, and some of the frights are actually scary, and on a repeat viewing the craftsmanship and attention to detail made more of an impression.
  30. Mr. Weintraub is a genial, garrulous interview subject, rattling off anecdotes about Colonel Parker, Sinatra and Pat Morita, and Mr. McGrath supplies lavish film clips of 1950s, '60s and '70s New York, Las Vegas and Los Angeles. It's not a vanity project, but it's the kind of deluxe package Jerry Weintraub has spent his life working relentlessly to assemble.
  31. Mr. Trudeau has a feel for not just political hypocrisy but also character, and this cast manages to bring life and even some charm to these Capitol Hill caricatures. Alpha House is not yet as sharply honed as “Veep,” but it could get there; it certainly has plenty of material to work with.
  32. A lighthearted, quite charming medieval adventure series made by the BBC, is tailored to the age of Obama.
  33. A reasonably entertaining though not exceptional science-fiction adventure series with a wild conspiracy plot whose hook is cloning.
  34. The story lines and characters are layered and more intricate than in most detective series.
  35. The many layers of feints and puzzles are compelling, but it’s hard to see how they can last more than a season or two.
  36. Mr. Kring has assured interviewers and fans that the third season will correct those mistakes and recover the fast-paced suspense and tension of the first season. The premiere episode lives up to that pledge, with lots of violence, special effects and laser-fast editing. The plot and ever-escalating conspiracies are hard to follow, but even first-time viewers can easily get the gist.
  37. An able cast led by Andie MacDowell and Dylan Neal makes it stand out from the stream of interchangeable Hallmark movies that aim for the same tone and audience.
  38. Noah read his material with good timing, shifting from sly to authoritative to snarky. What’s less clear yet is if he can be off-the-cuff funny.
  39. The many layers of feints and puzzles are compelling, but it’s hard to see how they can last more than a season or two.
  40. The series is smart and engrossing, though not in a particularly novel way, and that is not a bad thing.
  41. The Musketeers is an old-fashioned reinvention that is faithful to the spirit of the novel even as it changes the words.
  42. Americans accustomed to the fast pace and big laughs of network sitcoms will more than likely give up on these quieter, less eventful British counterparts within five minutes. Patience has its small rewards, though.
  43. “Weeds” is still an outstanding show, but it would be better if it didn’t push so hard to stand out.
  44. It's fascinating, frightening and more than a little exploitative, just like boxing itself.
  45. What really sets Key & Peele apart are the stars’ performances.
  46. It's an enjoyable, intriguing look at what can happen to a group of ordinary, cash-strapped people who wake up one day as multimillionaires.
  47. It is surprisingly appealing. Talk shows depend less on the topic at hand than the chemistry in the room, and The Chew has tapped five very different and amusingly mismatched hosts.
  48. A spunky upgrade over the collection of interchangeable police procedurals clogging the television schedule.
  49. While the new series may not stand out at this point, it’s already a better-than-average cop show, well paced, with reasonably snappy and believable dialogue.
  50. What the show lacks in this kind of irreverence it makes up for in plain old addictive soapiness.
  51. The first two episodes are relatively restrained by Luther standards, with an emphasis on plodding police work, while the case against Luther percolates in the background. Neil Cross still delivers the dread, though, as killers pop out of attics, closets and even closer places. The action picks up in the season’s second half.
  52. Ms. Coughlan somehow manages to lay low in the part and let supporting actors propel the comedy.
  53. This is period-piece television served with a wink. Just enjoy the notion--sometimes lost amid all of TV’s male murderers--that women too can be wicked.
  54. Ultimately it's a fairly standard TV movie, if an overly long one, ending on a note of sentimental affirmation and, luckily, offering one outstanding central performance.
  55. The program has a fair amount of feel-good filler about the bond between the dogs and their handlers, but when it comes to showing these pairs at work, it is blunt and disturbing.
  56. Season 3 begins with both ACN and Mr. Sorkin in a tamped-down, focused mode. That’s generally a good thing.
  57. Cold Justice picks up considerably in its second episode and seems as if it might be a worthy addition to the genre.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Too Big To Fail uses every cinematic trick in the book, but ultimately succeeds because we know that the danger was real.
  58. Mr. Baker keeps The Mentalist easy on the eyes and brain.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Is he ready for his own weekly half-hour show? Judging from the first two episodes of Important Things With Demetri Martin, which makes its debut on Wednesday night on Comedy Central, the answer is a qualified yes.
  59. The series is a free-for-all (a good thing), pitting representational artists against conceptual ones and so on.
  60. The attempt to be both a comedy and a drama doesn't always work--some of the story lines can have a desperate feel--but Misfits has enough going for it to snare aficionados of the odd.
  61. It’s a nonsensical but inventive and purely entertaining takeoff on superhero tales.
  62. This sometimes gripping show isn't so benign. First, the adversaries are worthy.
  63. It’s good for some dumb laughs, and--important in this age when complex television dramas consume so many of our brain cells--it doesn’t demand much of a mental commitment.
  64. This half-comic, half-serious soap opera à clef could be awful, but instead it is surprisingly fun.
  65. The suspense is effectively maintained in this high-seas whodunit. [22 Sep 1995]
    • The New York Times
  66. Their chemistry [Martin Clunes and Charles Edwards], and the quality of the production design (the settings include stately homes, factories and grubby farms), are the show’s best offerings. The mystery is overly complicated, with a twist that’s clumsily telegraphed in the first episode, and the theme of racial prejudice against the “half-caste” Edalji, while central to the story, is hit upon more heavily than is good for the drama. But there’s just enough Sherlockian fun to make the case for Arthur & George.
  67. The show may not be quite as artistically or intellectually refined as HBO cult favorites like The Sopranos or Six Feet Under, but Platinum is well made, imaginative and fun.
  68. A satirical and quite funny comedy about two British television writers, a husband- and wife team, Sean and Beverly Lincoln (Stephen Mangan and Tamsin Greig) who are lured to Hollywood to adapt their hit sitcom for an American network.
  69. At this point, the context may be more interesting than the characters.
  70. Shaped by directors and camera people, given the familiar MTV gloss of breathless pacing and quick edits, "The Real World" is a relentlessly artificial concept. ... Accepting that, viewers can sit back and enjoy the carefully cultivated performances, keeping them in skeptical perspective.
  71. If, while keeping its dialogue suggestive and surprising, Karen Sisco dramatizes the eccentricity, and the drinking problem, of its central character, rather than merely her sexiness or her skills, this show could thrive. But is Ms. Gugino up for it? With such a small cast -- only three characters are fixed at this point -- much will depend on Ms. Gugino's performance, on her drunken mistakes and on her cellular soliloquies.
  72. The comedy is nifty, light and kind, even as it tries to be real, slitting open the stand-up themes of marital sex, masturbation and dope smoking until it's dirty enough to convince you that you're not being condescended to, but smart enough not to be grim. That's a huge feat.
  73. [An] enjoyable and not insincere reworking of the much-reworked legend by Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  74. The show’s subversiveness, if it can be called that, is partly a matter of degree. It stands out (on basic cable, at least) for its frankness.... You wonder whether Mr. Falk can keep the plates spinning. Some jokes seem to be repeating themselves.
  75. The show can be applauded for giving opportunities to a wide range of talented actresses and for representing a multiplicity of ethnicities and orientations in its characters, but the stories built around them are notable for their melodramatic underpinnings and an occasional willingness to resort to clichés.... But Ms. Kohan and her writers, abetted by their excellent cast, know how to leave us laughing.
  76. It is an impressively credentialed and stylish bit of television moviemaking, an exploration not merely of our practical dependence on technology but also of our psychological and nearly eroticized addiction to it.
  77. Mr. Davies appears to have struggled with the material...But his dialogue is as sharp as ever, and there are excellent scenes between Sarah and Mrs. Beddows (Penelope Wilton), her champion on the school board, and Sarah and Robert (David Morrissey), the conservative landowner she wins to her side (in more ways than one).
  78. The Smithsonian Channel’s take, The Day the Bomb Dropped, which it shows on Sunday night, also treats the subject as ancient history, but it’s more absorbing because it relies much more on the personal accounts of witnesses.
  79. The surprise is that at least from the peppy pilot, it’s possible that this might actually work reasonably well.
  80. Ms. Balfe, Mr. Heughan and Tobias Menzies as the modern husband (who also pops up, inconveniently, in 1743) acquit themselves well, sharing the screen with the scenery and costumes and keeping straight faces through all the fantasy-romance conceits. They seem to be having a good time, and if you have a weakness for muskets, accents and the occasional roll in the heather, you probably will too.
  81. The first episode of “Traveler” is well made and quite gripping.
  82. Hopkins, a six-part documentary series by ABC News that begins on Thursday, provides an extraordinarily intimate look at doctors and desperately ill patients that is gripping but not groundbreaking.
  83. Television now seems crowded with so many alien species with meaningful cultural characteristics that we hardly need any new ones, but "Farscape" has its pluses. [19 Mar 1999]
    • The New York Times
  84. The depiction of the modern country music business in Nashville feels reasonably authentic, and when the story stays within that realm, it has the mix of hardheadedness, sentimentality and honky-tonk come-on you can get from a good country song.
  85. "Day Break" has enough suspense and clever turns to tempt viewers to stay and see how the next day breaks.
  86. Mr. Fiennes is fun to watch as an arrogant, punked-out Merlin; he's much more interesting than Jamie Campbell Bower, whose lightweight Arthur, to this point, doesn't appear to deserve all the attention he's getting....Best of all is Ms. Green, the Bond girl and Bernardo Bertolucci dream object, as Arthur's sister and rival (known here as Morgan). Her intensity is a good match for the show's gloomy-doomy, psychologizing mood.
  87. The two episodes that begin its stretch run on Wednesday reflect a slight flattening out that’s been evident in recent seasons: both depend to some extent on movie parodies, and in both the gags are a little less pointed than in the early seasons. But they’re still pretty good.
  88. “Ugly Betty” is a sweet, funny show. It’s worth watching. And we’ll see.
  89. The intricacies may make it harder for new viewers to crack the show without doing some catch-up watching, but they also make it far more absorbing.
  90. They explore the numbers behind things you thought you knew and things you ought to know, but this is no blackboard exercise.
  91. In Sleepyhead, the better of the two, someone is killing women by inducing strokes....In Scaredy Cat the crimes are just as bizarre, though the outcome is more predictable.
  92. Welcome to Sweden is pleasant, inoffensive and quite charming.
  93. The narrative this time around is even more stretched, derivative and repetitive than Season 3’s, but almost ingeniously so: It is both utterly predictable and surprisingly addictive.
  94. We surely didn’t need another filmed version of Austen’s first published novel--not after Ang Lee’s sublime adaptation of “Sense and Sensibility” 13 years ago--but we are content enough to have this one.
  95. While it sounds like a one-joke conceit, and a sophomoric one at that, this HBO series is oddly beguiling, a downbeat screwball comedy in R-rated clothing.

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