The New York Times' Scores

For 1,416 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Band of Brothers: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 665
  2. Negative: 0 out of 665
665 tv reviews
  1. The banter between the Blooms is so full of cloying sugar substitutes and so devoid of any real tension that there is no voyeuristic thrill to be had even from their--I'm just going to say it, because the show does--"sexpionage."
  2. At this point, everything about it feels generic.
  3. Accidentally on Purpose, with its matching sets of friends for Billie and Zack, its bland jokes, its lack of any sort of topicality, its Jenna Elfman, feels as if it could have been on any time in the last two decades.
  4. Much of the time in the early episodes is spent on the preparations for this mission [for one last big score] and on laying out a complicated network of alliances and animosities, and it gets to be a slog. Helping to keep us interested are Mark Ryan, providing a comic touch as a grizzled quartermaster, and Luke Arnold as a not-so-charming rogue named John Silver, not yet Long.
  5. The semi-improvised Z Rock has its moments, none of which can be described adequately here.
  6. Each warrior is given equal time and the evidence is piled up on both sides to maximize the suspense around the weekly suspect's guilt or innocence. But the personality cost is too high for the payoff.
  7. No one appearing on Melrose Place 2.0 is nearly that dreadful, and the one-liners that remind us that we are not watching the television of a historic golden age retain the zesty camp of the series’s first iteration.
  8. Across the four early episodes provided for review, Pierce's hallucinations are already beginning to feel like stunts covering up for a lack of ideas.
  9. Ms. Greer and Mr. Faxon are talented comedians, but the writing isn’t quite up to their abilities.... The show improves when Russ leaves the house and hangs out with his bitter, profane best friends.
  10. [Coma] is sometimes entertaining, sometimes infuriating.
  11. Peter Sagal begins Constitution USA, his four-part exploration of the founding American document, with look-at-me gimmicks that are more annoying than enlightening, but the series grows more substantive as it goes along.
  12. Don’t look for the depth of “House,” “Grey’s Anatomy” or other top-flight medical dramas here. But if preposterous, pulse-pounding pileups of bizarre accidents and obscure medical conditions appeal to you, sure, put the trashy beach novel aside and help yourself.
  13. The premise of You’re the Worst is amusing, but the lines don’t match it. Once Gretchen and Jimmy get out of bed and back to their lives--he’s a writer, she’s a publicist--You’re the Worst gets a little better.
  14. It's purposefully neutered.
  15. [Peter Dinklage, Ciaran Hinds, Paul Kaye, and Dianna Rigg are] all fun to watch, even when their characters don’t have anything in particular to do besides relay information that we need to keep up with the story or keep straight the seven (so we’re told) warring families.
  16. Turning Dracula into a fanged insurgent battling ruthless oligarchs is a nifty idea, and the electricity plot allows for diverting steampunk-meets-“Bride of Frankenstein” visuals. But nothing about the show is as much fun as it should be. The storytelling is slow and anemic, spelling everything out at length.
  17. When Dominion isn’t preoccupied with filling in its portentous back story, it provides some capably filmed action and a higher grade of acting than usual for this kind of show.
  18. Origins is no worse than average among the class of shows--“24,” “The Unit,” “MI5”--that mix high-tech intelligence gathering with bloody commando action.
  19. At least the Sopranos knew how to have fun.... Mr. Momoa and Mr. Henderson acquit themselves well without generating any heat or much of any feeling. The best work is by Julianne Nicholson as Harold’s damaged wife and Zahn McClarnon as a foot soldier in Phillip’s drug operation.
  20. The basics of the story are given interview-style, with the most telegenic parts recreated in sparse scenes. The presentations are peppered with enmity from both directions.
  21. The medical scenes are competent but forgettable, while the scenes of Charlie's peregrinations are sometimes interesting and funny but surprisingly infrequent.
  22. What looks like a flat noir thriller could still make for a pretty entertaining police procedural.
  23. Happy Endings is both a retro version of "Friends" and a more superficially progressive one.
  24. Though the series begins amusingly enough, it quickly descends into cloying buddy escapade, in which the full-of-heart slacker seeks to teach his careerist boss how to care, and the careerist boss teaches his moldable young thing about cunning and diligence and clothes that cost a mortgage payment.
  25. Absolutely ordinary. [21 Sep 1998]
    • The New York Times
  26. While Mr. Douglas glides through the film--demonstrating that his talent for portraying carnivorous lechery and polished duplicity works regardless of sexual orientation--and Mr. Damon is earnest and committed, the love, or whatever it was, between Thorson and Liberace never comes into emotional focus.
  27. Without Zoe Barnes, prostitutes, corrupt lobbyists and dissipated members of Congress to perk up the landscape as in seasons past, the show feels monotonous. It certainly looks it.
  28. Resurrection starts out well enough.... All too soon, however, the mystery turns into soapy melodrama, and the supernatural is superseded by the clichés of network drama.
  29. It has more of the feel of a traditional family sitcom than the louder, jokier competition on Nickelodeon, but the humor is still pretty broad and the plotting blunt for anyone outside that age group.
  30. Peaky Blinders is literate (watch for the visual references to “L’Atalante” and Charon’s crossing) and sometimes great looking, with impressive evocations of hellish industrial sections of Birmingham that have a science-fiction feel. But for a sprawling soap opera that packs in Roma curses, shell shock, hash pipes, Chinatown prostitutes and gang members sporting the 1919 version of a half-shaved boy-band haircut, it doesn’t have quite enough juice.
  31. Women’s Murder Club is all right, but not good enough.
  32. The shortcoming of NY Med isn’t Dr. Oz (who is not around much in the early episodes); it’s that the program doesn’t trust its own best vignettes, lingering too long on emotions that speak for themselves, tarting up inherently powerful moments with syrupy music.
  33. Quite a number of rats buy the farm, or whatever it is that rats buy, at the hands of the Magic men in the opening episode. But these two guys are not telegenic or charismatic enough to make rodent removal interesting.
  34. Reign looks good (the pilot was shot in Ireland), moves smoothly and features CW’s characteristic bland but competent performances.
  35. The characters don’t live up to the swirling, often violent action that surrounds them.
  36. What is obvious to viewers after only a few minutes is not obvious to the supposedly crack investigators dispatched to untangle the conspiracy, whose Ludlumesque layers they fail to see.
  37. The World According to Dick Cheney has interesting insights and revealing moments, but for critics who long to confront Mr. Cheney it may prove dissatisfying, because it allows him to make astonishing assertions without direct contradiction or follow-up questions.
  38. Mr. Danson has some funny moments, but he is not as comfortable in a comic genre where deadpan takes the place of punch line.
  39. The gore is plentiful, the tone is inconsistent, and by the end only one thing is undeniably clear: Mockingbird Lane is a very different creature from "The Munsters."
  40. It may be too much a celebration of Rev Run's normalcy to be all that intriguing.
  41. Hello Ladies is a diverting curiosity, nice to look at and good for a few squirmy laughs.
  42. The malaria story, it seems to say, is filmable only if the central figures are white and it is larded up with the kind of button-pushing that television dramas thrive on.... But the scenes in which the two actresses are together have some real power.
  43. Sharknado 2 intends to be nothing more than dumb fun, and it succeeds well enough at that. But it also leaves you regretting that the Sharknado team (Anthony C. Ferrante again directed from a script by Thunder Levin) didn’t reach for camp greatness.
  44. Leverage winds up seeming merely anachronistic, wrapping up with a cute resolution each week, the swine in handcuffs, not torn from the private hockey rinks of their Aspen vacation homes.
  45. As to whether the show will get back on track, the early signals are mixed.
  46. "The Unit" becomes distinctive only when the action shifts back to the wives left behind on the base.
  47. The scripts are efficient. The acting is decent. But you're likely to find yourself just waiting for the familiar crises and character complications to come along, and sure enough, they do.
  48. Rock Center is still a work in progress, so it's hard to judge how it will fare.
  49. Those jokes are supposed to establish Liz’s geek cred, but they mostly serve as speed bumps in the show’s otherwise fast and clever banter.
  50. At least in the early stages, the series is quite entertaining. But over all, the mini-series suffers from defensive storytelling; it's a narrative driven in splintered directions less by inspiration than by avoidance.
  51. It’s reasonably smart, reasonably interesting and reasonably well acted without being particularly good.
  52. An Adventure in Space and Time turns out to be an entirely conventional backstage drama, moving at a leisurely pace and making every reversal and triumph easily comprehensible for an audience that may not have seen the original show.
  53. The Equalizer...recites the Vigilante Creed with effective fervor. And Mr. Woodward, the always accomplished actor whose more recent credits include "A Christmas Carol" on television and the title role in the Australian film "Breaker Morant," is so good that he makes the entire questionable enterprise seem almost reasonable.
  54. The show's jarring shift in tone suggests a touch of the film "Syriana," as well, all of which leaves us with a hard-to-digest influence soup. It's as if a novelist were telling you that she wrote while under the spell of both Salinger and Nancy Drew.
  55. It feels as if the attention that should have gone to the storytelling all went to the atmosphere and the repartee.
  56. The film has some very nice moments, but it also has its share of awkwardness, and the director, the television veteran Roger Young, can’t seem to get his multinational cast on the same page or find a consistent tone.
  57. In the absence of an arcing narrative, the series wants us to accept as its mission of suspense the mystery of this crypto drag-king-meets-shopaholic friendship.
  58. It’s the last of the big-four British costume dramas of recent years to make its American public-television debut, after “Downton Abbey,” “Call the Midwife” and “Mr. Selfridge,” and it’s the most frivolous of the bunch, which is saying quite a bit.
  59. It's well made and also at times unnecessarily cheesy.
  60. The show is based on a small independent film of the same name, which was never terribly daring to begin with. Any sharpness has been smoothed away for television. Mary and her friends talk endlessly about drinking, but never get drunk; they make knowing references to long-ago loss of virginity, but never seem to have sex. Party Girl is as sweetly innocent as "Clueless," the film that seems to provide its true inspiration.
  61. Though the first episode of Mr. Belvedere indicates that the basic format is fertile ground for humor, its creators should beware believing that a benign laugh track means they have been funny.
  62. The problem is more likely to be the generic nature of Emily's misadventures, and the soap opera implausibility of the medical stories, which is extreme, even for the genre.
  63. Eastbound & Down feels static.
  64. It wasn’t a singalong or a sacrilege or a slavish, shameless remake. It was a live performance of a legendary musical that felt muted and a little sad.
  65. The paradox of The Tudors is that it takes on one of the most powerful and protested institutions in human history--the Catholic Church during the Renaissance--and provides little sense of what the English people have to gain or lose by breaking with it.
  66. All of that good early work by the cast explodes in a ball of predictability.
  67. It might not even be around long enough to develop a consistent tone or viewpoint, both of which are lacking in the pilot. But it has a pretty good actress, Anne Heche ("Hung"), at the head of the cast, and it at least tries to add a touch of levity to what has always been a ponderously serious genre.
  68. It is louder, bolder and more lurid than the original, and also more boring.
  69. Initial verdict: clunky.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    [Cooper's] presence [is] almost engaging enough to redeem an overstuffed, overbaked first episode.
  70. "Catfish" was a clever riff on a found-footage thriller, Catfish: The TV Show is a standard reality series mixing elements of the dating and rehab-therapy genres.
  71. The usual stuff of such shows--arguments among team members; a race against the clock--is served up, though here the disagreements are peppered with phrases out of a physics class about kinetic friction, static friction and so on.
  72. For a short-form digital series, Play It Again, Dick is fairly amusing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The show isn't entertaining, exactly — it has none of the wit or style of "Desperate Housewives." But like so much reality TV, it's both educational and grimly fascinating, and leaves you feeling much better about your own life — if for no other reason than that you would never be so stupid as to appear on a show like this.
  73. The writers may work their way out of this corner and Mr. McIntyre, who's a bit lightweight at this point, may grow into the central role. In the meantime there are still touches of the unbridled campiness that made the first season amusing.
  74. The models themselves are incidental on Scouted, merely empty planets around which revolve some fascinating characters and plenty more dull ones.
  75. The challenges are too outsize and the format is too confusing to take full advantage of the gimmick.
  76. The hallucination conceit is strange but not necessarily horrible.... The problem with “Raines” is that it tries too hard to be too many things at once.
  77. The Bridge still feels like a show caught between two masters. It has a lot of the pieces it needs to actually be a compelling murder mystery--some good performances in key roles; an evocative, sun-blasted look; and an ability (presumably Mr. Reid’s) to concoct creepy, suspenseful scenes. Yet we’re still waiting for it all to come together.
  78. The music, costumes, lighting and even some camera shots--a shower head, a spiral staircase--all evoke classic Hitchcock movies like "Psycho," "Spellbound" and "Vertigo." But the film loses steam as soon as Hitchcock acts on his passion.
  79. Plain Jane is more than shopping spree and vocabulary builder; it betrays a cockamamie respect for the therapeutic process, and it shouldn't be giving too much away to tell you that the snails lose, that the plain Janes blossom, and that no stimulus money has been wasted along the way.
  80. Pizazz is what’s missing from CBS’s new drama, Eleventh Hour, in which Rufus Sewell plays Dr. Jacob Hood.
  81. The snowcapped mountains, pine forests and shimmering lakes are majestic, the Palin children are adorable, and the series looks like a travelogue--wholesome, visually breathtaking and a little dull.
  82. [The cast] all do their best to provide what every comic-book adaptation needs and so few achieve, which is a little soul, some human substance at the core. Powers shows occasional, fitful signs of that kind of life, though in the long run it may be just too threadbare to get there.
  83. This might be more amusing if Shane and Kim were more expressive or interesting, but neither evinces much personality.
  84. Mr. Stone brings a more stentorian absolutism, leaving no room for doubt or nuance.
  85. Franklin & Bash has some of the ingredients of perfectly adequate summer filler: it's handsomely shot; the writing, line by line, is as good as or better than that of most of the cable competition; and there are appealing actors like Malcolm McDowell, Reed Diamond and Ms. Davis in supporting roles. The problem is that Franklin and Bash themselves are resolutely uninteresting.
  86. The pilot begins promisingly with Max unfurling an Aaron Sorkin-like rant at a customer foolish enough to snap his fingers to get her attention. But after that there are too many one-liners about semen stains and orgasms that aren't clever, just pronounced very loudly to carry over the titters of a studio audience.
  87. If only for the costumes and '60s music, Pan Am is amusing to see at least once, but if it has any instructive benefit at all, it's as a mood indicator for these times, not those.
  88. Dorian has potential, but Kennex, at least in the pilot, is as grim and humorless as they come. He needs to loosen up.
  89. The mini-series and its characters are all over the map, stylistically, seeming unable to find the right tone for the time period.
  90. [Stars Earn Stripes] drenches a promising premise in a distracting amount of troop-thanking.
  91. Flashpoint lingers when it ought to speed up. It is a show about crisis that refuses to make you anxious.
  92. It’s creepy, steamy and funny at times, and it’s also a muddle, a comic murder mystery that is a little too enthralled with its own exoticism.
  93. Most of the elaborately introduced plotlines fizzle out (or simply vanish), and the final surprise is the worst kind of twist ending, arrived at arbitrarily and seemingly presented for its shock value.
  94. The show suffers from a failure to commit: resolutely charting a middle course between cheese-ball parody and something darker and more sophisticated, it manages to be both over the top and consistently flat, too silly to take seriously and too dull to care about.
  95. Mr. Ritter sells the character pretty well.... The other McCarthys are also all familiar archetypes, which makes this show another in what seems to be a trend of comfort-food comedies: witty without being ambitious; safe rather than scalding.
  96. Hit & Miss is so slow and earnest and teachy--several scenes involve Mia's young son exploring his own sexual identity by donning a dress and headband--that much of the show seems to be performed on tiptoe, and a giggle seems like the appropriate response.
  97. It's refreshing, and ultimately unnerving, to see just how naïve Jane Quimby (Erica Dasher) is at the outset of Jane by Design.
  98. It’s pretty easy to loathe this stuff if you like your comedy more ragged, drug-addled and confrontational. But there’s an easygoing red-state pleasantness to it too, a celebration of timeless and consoling suburban inertia.

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