The New York Times' Scores

For 1,850 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Transparent: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 882
  2. Negative: 0 out of 882
882 tv reviews
  1. The storytelling in The Fades can be convoluted and creaky, but there's some wit to the writing, and the horror and battle scenes are legitimately frightening, by TV standards.
  2. It’s an ambitious, if not entirely coherent, sci-fi shoot-’em-up that questions nihilistic entertainment impulses while indulging them.
  3. “Heroes” tries very hard to spook viewers with hints of science fiction and dark conspiracies. But its main appeal is the curious link among complete strangers.
  4. An eclectic, speedy and fun-enough cartoon.
  5. This is the world of “Weeds” a few tax brackets lower, and the sense of emptiness is as aggressively conveyed.
  6. Satisfaction is the most daring, because it’s not really a comedy, and that makes its intent oblique and quasi-European.... The series picks up as it moves away from the couple’s problems and into the complications Neil’s new career creates.
  7. John Adams is the weakest part of John Adams.
  8. CW shows tend to walk a thin line between escapism and soap opera, and after its witty pilot the show spends Episodes 2 and 3 massaging the tear ducts, hard. But there is the potential for something at least as good as “Gilmore Girls."
  9. The dialogue, timing and jokes have the madcap pace and anarchic spirit of "Scrubs," and it takes a while for Ms. Cox to recalibrate her Monica persona from "Friends."
  10. Haven not only resembles its Syfy stablemates, but it's also just about as good, which means that if you like a cozy, lived-in mystery with some quirky characters in a pleasant setting--and you don't mind spotty writing and perfunctory camerawork--you may enjoy it.
  11. Mr. Cubitt has set up a parallel between Gibson and Spector and wants to suggest that she, too, isn’t in full control of her sexual impulses. But he hasn’t made the parallel interesting, and it makes Gibson a less believable character, despite Ms. Anderson’s fine performance.
  12. Watching the pilot again, though, it became harder to ignore the soap opera underpinnings and the twee sentimentality.
  13. Zoo is expertly made and fits the current fascination with dystopian what-if scenarios, but it’s basic.
  14. In the premiere, at least, all of that ends up being only moderately involving because it's all so calculated.
  15. Friday Night Dinner, which had its first season on the British Channel 4 this spring, is a rowdier, sweatier, more profane show that will probably seem more typically British to American fans of "Fawlty Towers" or "The Royle Family."
  16. Like the weed that fuels its time-travel plot, Bong, which begins on Wednesday (4/20, natch), provides a painless, quickly forgotten experience during which you may laugh for reasons that won’t be entirely clear.
  17. Happily Divorced is less a sitcom than a showcase for Ms. Drescher's delightful, if somewhat time-worn, brand of schtick.
  18. The film’s inevitable compressions, made worse by the amount of empty, self-congratulatory celebrity blathering, mean that every Pryor fan will have omissions to complain about. But the best strategy is probably to sit back and enjoy what’s there.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There's a fine line between clever and stupid, as somebody says in "This Is Spinal Tap," Rob Reiner's cleverly stupid "rockumentary." Beavis and Butt-head don't just walk that line: they live there. [11 July 1993, p.8]
    • The New York Times
  19. [A] glossy, silly, intermittently entertaining new series.
  20. NBC’s show, which is more about fembot martial arts and slick “Matrix”-ish special effects than about character development, is oriented toward young male viewers.
  21. "Four Kings" is better than a lot of similar sitcoms, but it's not different enough to stand out in what NBC hopes will be a renaissance of must-see television.
  22. Robert Carlyle has a gravity that allows him to sell the most implausible science-fiction hokum, making you realize that performance as much as writing makes this kind of thing work.
  23. The strained '40s-speak starts to recede in the third episode (four were sent to critics), and, not coincidentally, the performances begin to improve--what looked like community theater acting in the pilot suddenly seems more natural.
  24. The series is in the "NYPD Blue" and "Southland" vein, trying for realism. It isn't in those shows' league, but it's a welcome change from the glossy triviality of other summer filler like "Rookie Blue" or "The Good Guys."
  25. The question is not whether "3 Lbs" is familiar and predictable, but whether "3 Lbs" is entertaining. It is, and mostly because it is so familiar and predictable.
  26. Unfortunately, the three hours of the show, while they include chases, sexual entrapment, grisly murders and lots of spycraft, never exceed the tension in those quiet opening scenes.
  27. The writing is a bit stilted and predictable, but the show is not unbearable--are some amusing supporting actors and the occasional engrossing medical crisis. As a character study, however, HawthoRNe is weighed down in the pursuit of worthIness.
  28. Mr. Allen's sitcom may well work, although by the second episode it already shows uneasy signs of cuteness bloat. [17 Sep 1991]
    • The New York Times
  29. “Vanished” offers suspense and high-society melodrama.

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