The New York Times' Scores

For 1,903 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Undeclared: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 908
  2. Negative: 0 out of 908
908 tv reviews
  1. It's impossible not to root for the Bruce family. But it's just as hard not to dread the series's success.
  2. The work is different, but personality-wise, Archer and his comrades are much the same. At least at first. The show seems to be giving itself license to explore.
  3. In the first two episodes, Scrubs quickly achieves a breezy comic rhythm. Like ''Spin City'' this show operates with deliberate artifice but enough warmth to bring humanity to the characters.
  4. The whole enterprise is wrapped in a big-budget look and served with a respect for the ability of young minds to perceive offbeat, incongruous humor, the very quality that made the books so successful in the first place.
  5. Life on Mars is a smarter, gloomier "Journeyman."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mr. Brown has bought into something real: our childlike joy in being fooled.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is, overall, a marvelous ensemble, both in concept and in performance.
  6. Season 2 is, from the start, an entirely messier, more contingent affair, enjoyable in a different and, to me, more appealing way.
  7. All of the actors are good; Mr. Raymond-James is scary good; and the story rips along at a brisk pace. No one who works in the penal system will like the portrayals here, but lovers of mystery and suspense could easily be hooked.
  8. Quibbles aside, Game of Thrones is still remarkable for both the scrupulousness and the lavishness of its production, beautiful to look at and mostly engaging to follow, though there is something of the accountant’s method in Mr. Martin’s fantasy--progress through constant addition--that transfers into the television show.
  9. It has a chance to crossbreed the better angels of character drama with devilish genre splatter. Within its oversize color panels there’s some hard-boiled philosophy about trying to be good in a world of sin. And there’s little on TV quite like its fallen world.
  10. There is a genuine suspense and thrill to the show now, but it succeeds largely as a treatise not on the tragedy of cancer but on the sheer monotony of it, the relentless waiting around.
  11. Each slight, breezy half-hour is fresh and funny.
  12. A brisk and concise 82-minute film.
  13. All three characters are highly appealing, but the charm of the show lies in the delicate balance of engrossing drama and disarming humor; the series is not campy or self-conscious, it’s witty in an offhand, understated way.
  14. The Leftovers appears no more interested than before in answering big questions about the Departure. But it goes nowhere beautifully.
  15. These four women are amusing, at times poignant, but not easily likable. The show is caustic and hard to watch, but harder to turn off. In Season 3, their solipsism and callousness are even more pointed, all the more shocking, and still quite funny.
  16. Las Vegas is as flattering to companies like the MGM Mirage Inc. as "The Love Boat" once was to Princess Cruises. Yet the show still manages to be slick, fast-paced and engaging, a remake of the remake of "Ocean's Eleven," in which all the good-looking people work for the casino, not against it.
  17. Its a clever and engaging reinterpretation by Bill Gallagher, who shaped the script to contemporary tastes and sensibilities--notably, a postmodern fatigue with ideology and big thoughts.
  18. New Girl is charming and quite funny, but especially when compared with the other two shows, it seems quite old-school.
  19. As with all of the best examples of this genre--this film was not made to provide a feel-good moment that enables us to go back to forgetting about the bombing and those most affected by it. It was made to remind us that recovery is far harder and more complex than we realize.
  20. Yes, the series sometimes grows a bit preachy: This installment, like its predecessors, tends to indulge in extended scenes whose dialogue can sound as if it were from a PBS documentary or a newspaper exposé. But you have to admire the ability of Mr. Ridley and his actors to wrap the earnestness in a compelling package.
  21. Harder is capturing the tone of another era. The Duffers manage that quite well, too, thanks to a fine sense of restraint that increasingly seems a lost art these days. There are a few good shocks here, but mostly there is patience. None of it would work without solid acting, and the series has that in abundance.
  22. It’s sophisticated, well-acted television for a warm-weather series.
  23. Manh(a)ttan provides a cleverly imagined portrait of the men and women who were at the epicenter of that peculiar sovereignty.
  24. [Broadbent] is unrecognizable and remarkable in the role of Longford, capturing both the man’s dotty hauteur and his awkward, absent-minded chivalry.
  25. It’s built on sharp writing and equally sharp acting, as any good series needs to be.
  26. Jane the Virgin isn’t exactly sui generis: it has traces of past series that blended whimsy and wile, including “Ugly Betty” and “Pushing Daisies,” but this show has a delightful heroine and its own sweetly wicked inflection.
  27. It’s an exceedingly watchable history lesson.
  28. This spy drama is not as dense and psychologically intricate, but it has compensations, most notably the placement of fictional characters like McAuliffe and Torriti alongside real-life figures like Angleton and Philby, and inside real-life crises like the 1956 Hungarian uprising.

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