The New York Times' Scores

For 9,703 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Hours
Lowest review score: 0 If One Thing Matters: A Film About Wolfgang Tillmans
Score distribution:
9,703 movie reviews
  1. New York becomes a complex character in this vital and sharply intelligent film.
  2. You can know every glitch that made this such a dangerous mission, and Apollo 13 will still have you by the throat. [30 June 1995]
    • The New York Times
  3. The film's sleek moodiness and visual sophistication are so effective that there's even a scene here that makes Detroit look like the most romantic city in the world.
  4. An irresistible black comedy and a wicked delight. [27 Sept 1995]
    • The New York Times
  5. One of the enormous pleasures of genre filmmaking is watching great directors push against form and predictability, as Mr. Romero does brilliantly in Land of the Dead. One thing is for sure: You won't go home hungry.
  6. Audiard's superb remake improves on the original significantly, investing it with aesthetic grandeur and emotional depth.
  7. One of this year's indisputably great films.
  8. Like Hitchcock, Mr. Wong is at once a voyeur and fetishist par excellence.
  9. Mr. Herzog is also no ordinary filmmaker. It is the rare documentary like Grizzly Man, which has beauty and passion often lacking in any type of film, that makes you want to grab its maker and head off to the nearest bar to discuss man's domination of nature and how Disney's cute critters reflect our profound alienation from the natural order.
  10. A masterpiece of indirection and pure visceral thrills, David Cronenberg's latest mindblower, A History of Violence, is the feel-good, feel-bad movie of the year.
  11. Mr. Howard has made Ransom in the same clean, swift, logical style that sent his "Apollo 13" into orbit, resulting in a spellbinding crime tale that delivers surprises right down to the wire.
  12. Mr. Ledger magically and mysteriously disappears beneath the skin of his lean, sinewy character. It is a great screen performance, as good as the best of Marlon Brando and Sean Penn.
  13. The rapport between Ms. Watts and Mr. Serkis is extraordinary, even though it is mediated by fur, latex, optical illusions and complicated effects. Mr. Serkis, who also played Gollum in the "Lord of the Rings" movies, is redefining screen acting for the digital age, while Ms. Watts incarnates the glamour and emotional directness of classical Hollywood.
  14. It's movie making of the high, smooth, commercial order that Hollywood prides itself on but achieves with singular infrequency.
  15. Not since "Love Story" has there been a movie that so shrewdly and predictably manipulated the emotions for such entertaining effect.
  16. Excellent quasidocumentary, which sends shivers down the spine. (Review of Original Release)
  17. An absolute knockout of a movie in the psychological horror line has been accomplished by Roman Polanski in his first English-language film. (Review of Original Release)
  18. This film, which was never released in America and will now be making its way across the country in limited release, has been immaculately restored and features new subtitles. You can get lost in the blackness of its heart and its shadows. You might never come back.
  19. A beautifully written, seamlessly directed film with award-worthy performances by Ms. Rampling and Ms. Young.
  20. Together with his extraordinary performers, Mr. Chéreau breathes life into characters who long ago set a course for death.
  21. A triumph of modesty and of seriousness that also happens to be one of the finest American films of the year.
  22. A sublimely nimble evisceration of that cult of celebrity known as the British royal family.
  23. Nikolaus Geyrhalter's superb documentary is an unblinking, often disturbing look at industrial food production from field to factory.
  24. The easy, complacent distance that informs much historical filmmaking is almost entirely absent from this supremely intelligent, unfailingly honest movie.
  25. A few scenes serve as hinges joining this movie to "Flags of Our Fathers." While Letters From Iwo Jima seems to me the more accomplished of the two films -- by which I mean that it strikes me as close to perfect -- the two enrich each other, and together achieve an extraordinary completeness.
  26. Children of Men may be something of a bummer, but it’s the kind of glorious bummer that lifts you to the rafters, transporting you with the greatness of its filmmaking.
  27. A swift and accessible entertainment, blunt in its power and exquisite in its effects.
  28. The result is an American masterpiece, independent to the bone.
  29. In our wistful estimation, the most delightful comedy-romance in years.
  30. It is a film of enormous visceral power with, in the central role, a performance by Tom Cruise that defines everything that is best about the movie.

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