The New York Times' Scores

For 9,905 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Fill the Void
Lowest review score: 0 Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2
Score distribution:
9,905 movie reviews
  1. The amateurish production values might be pardonable if the clichés -- the hard-core porn star with the soft heart, the therapist who needs to heal herself -- inside the poorly lighted, badly shot images weren’t so absurd and often insulting.
  2. As depressing as the résumés of its 9-to-5 characters, The Strip sweats to wring laughs from overworked themes and underwhelming performances.
  3. By the end the most vivid figure on the screen is the lovable doggie who goes wherever dangling fingers are waiting to give the happy pooch a scratch.
  4. The movie plays like a made-for-television quickie.
  5. Feels like a desperate attempt to stretch a flimsy half-hour made-for-cable concept into a feature film.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The director, James Wan, and the writer, Leigh Whannell (the team behind the controversially brutal "Saw" series), deliver the mandatory shocks and gross-outs, backed by dissonant bursts of music and made almost elegant by the cinematographer John R. Leonetti's desaturated images.
  6. A.C.O.D., an unfunny comedy about a guy mooning over his parents’ divorce decades later, is so eager to please it’s hard to hate. But it’s sluggish even at 87 minutes, clichéd and gives you nothing of interest to look at other than some familiar faces.
  7. Remains a sadly earthbound thing, mired in a dismal realism that lies far from its natural environment.
  8. One of the things that makes Adore, which was written by Christopher Hampton, hard to take seriously is how seriously it takes itself, how utterly purged of humor or credible human complication the drama at its center turns out to be.
  9. Of all the shoddy, insipid qualities of Bangkok Dangerous, the most egregious is the most fundamental: The film is simply dreadful to look at.
  10. Aiming for a moody portrait of psychological distress, Mark Jackson directs with a sluggish pace, an abstract style and a dismal aesthetic that rebuff involvement.
  11. This poorly acted, ramshackle tour of the lower echelons of the Los Angeles rock scene has the feel of a largely improvised home movie filmed without retakes, and its sense of humor could only be fully appreciated by struggling musicians.
  12. It’s a phoned-in, gutless piece of hack work that reminds you of other, better films in the same vein.
  13. If realism is what you're after, you'll do better at "The Three Stooges." The Lucky One is where you will find death, redemption and kisses in the rain.
  14. The movie, which imagines its principal characters as metaphorically ticking time bombs, never convincingly portrays their passions.
  15. Doesn’t seem as if it would translate easily to the big screen. It hasn't.
  16. The result is that what was once insignificant is now insufferable.
  17. Without Mr. Roberts and his grinning insouciance, this well-meaning mess would have no heartbeat at all.
  18. It is a film with nothing but delight — no major revelations, no gravity and no meaning. This superficiality is a problem only because of the pretense of being about great art.
  19. An attempt to inaugurate a new movie franchise, something that might appeal to women and mystery fans. This is a perfectly sound ambition, but the movie, directed by Julie Anne Robinson from a script by Stacy Sherman, Karen Ray and Liz Brixius, is so weary and uninspired that it feels more like an exhausted end than an energetic beginning.
  20. For all its experimental intentions, Loudmouth Soup feels familiar: a claustrophobic Hollywood satire that's short on kinesis and long on conversation.
  21. Makes no psychological sense. Even within the convoluted realm of film noir, the development of the relationships defies any logic.
  22. This picture is mostly a lump of run-of-the-mill profanity sprinkled with a few remarks so geared toward engendering audience sympathy that you might think he was running for office -- or trying to win over a probation officer.
  23. Hot Rod might be called the poor man’s “Eagle vs. Shark” if “Eagle vs. Shark” were not already the poor man’s “Napoleon Dynamite.” It certainly lacks the conceptual purity and aesthetic integrity of the “Jackass” movies. In any case poor certainly describes the quality of the filmmaking.
  24. If Bullett Raja had more spark, it might be fun to contemplate its barely hidden crisis-of-masculinity subtexts.
  25. A cringing romance that Mr. Vinterberg tries and fails to spin into a political allegory.
  26. A tediously didactic, often condescendingly reductive 10-part lesson on cinema.
  27. The guiding philosophy of The Price of Milk seems to be that if you throw something on the screen and call it a fairy tale, it has to mean something. But it doesn't.
  28. A painfully gauche, galumphing attack on factory farming, meat eating, animal experimentation and human supremacy.
  29. The re- enactments, however fascinating they may be as history, are too crude to serve the work especially well.

Top Trailers