The New York Times' Scores

For 10,129 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Lowest review score: 0 Hush
Score distribution:
10,129 movie reviews
  1. A movie like We Are Marshall stands or falls on its ability to make you feel the pain and loss of individuals in a place where community pride and football are one and the same. As the film, directed by McG (the "Charlie's Angels" movies) from a wooden screenplay by Jamie Linden, follows a handful of Huntington residents during the months after the accident, not one of them comes fully to life.
  2. Perhaps the directors are under the delusion that the dodging and leaping can make up for an ending that leaves the cast members of "Killer" adrift and nearly scratching their heads in puzzlement.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A deranged, sometimes desperate parody of an inspirational losers-make-good comedy. Three gags miss for every one that hits.
  3. The screenplay is closer in tone to an uneasy mixture of post-"Seinfeld" bile and unfocused Altmanesque satirical misanthropy. Partly because the story's structure is so haphazard, most of the jokes land with a thud.
  4. The relentless upbeatness of Life or Something Like It wrecks the possibility of either real laughter or genuine pathos.
  5. The computer-generated world is visually rich, but short on the droll humor that makes good children's films bearable for adults.
  6. It’s an awkward mix of sentiment, underdeveloped relationships and rock ’n’ roll pretensions, and it never quite gels into the “Love Story” for the 21st century that it wants to be.
  7. The credibility is low, the idealism high and the sentiment through the roof in Jesse Baget's slender, micro-budgeted comedy Cellmates, a schematic parable about racism and (less overtly) illegal immigration.
  8. An unholy, incoherent mess.
  9. As its momentum accelerates, and its special effects transform it into a pulpy cartoon, Predators loses its judgment and turns into a frantic, clichéd chase film. This chaotic stew of fire, blood, mud and explosives is so devoid of terror and suspense that any metaphorical analysis is rendered moot.
  10. Enervatingly synthetic, The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears slices and dices the images and tropes of Italian giallo-style slasher films into an inert pile of style.
  11. The film, written and directed by Robert Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon, rarely dares to be smart, settling instead for familiar gags that would have the Devil himself yawning.
  12. The narration promises surprises (“This story may challenge what you think you know about the roles men and women play in Mormon homes”), but the movie might have started by examining its straw-man conception of the audience.
  13. The problem with Miss March is that it isn't very funny.
  14. One
    The film's spareness and lack of words seem affected and ultimately unrealistic. At such moments, its refusal to put things into words and its crushing sense of gloom turn self-defeating.
  15. While it seems there's no getting away from this marketing aesthetic, the resemblance at times to a video game is far, far too acute.
  16. Less interested in politics than in profitably flattering the suspicions and resentments of its intended teenage audience.
  17. Long on atmosphere and short on believability.
  18. The Viral Factor wants to be both an action movie and a soap opera. But the merging of the two genres by Dante Lam, a director based in Hong Kong, is clumsy, and so is the film.
  19. It’s a far cry from the wonders of Morris Engel’s “Little Fugitive” and might have been better off in a kid’s-size portion as a short.
  20. A grave and disappointing failure, as much of imagination as of technology.
  21. Clearly, this is an affair to forget.
  22. My Uncle Rafael stumbles over forced plotting and setups and falls prey to its hero's avuncular mushiness.
  23. Holly is supposed to be out of Guy’s league, but neither of them is up to carrying scene after scene of weak sparring and punny flirting.
  24. The movie is a bust, and, as usual in these situations, it is easier to say how than why, and best to say as little as possible, cut one's losses and move on.
  25. The best thing that can be said about Boys and Girls is that it is studiously inoffensive.
  26. For all its visual pizazz A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III has the jerky momentum of a collection of disconnected skits loosely thrown together with only the vaguest notion of where it’s heading or what it all means. At best it is a mildly diverting goof with a charmless lead performance. Its underlying misogyny leaves a sour taste.
  27. The movie’s principal saving grace is Ms. Winslet’s convincing portrayal of Adele, a despairing woman of low self-esteem just a twitch away from a nervous breakdown. In almost every other respect, this overbaked romantic hokum is preposterous.
  28. Though filled with romantic contrivances and overlong musical numbers, Undiscovered is curiously lifeless. Bland actors portray single-cell characters in a plot scarcely more diverting than Ms. Simpson's reality vehicle, "The Ashlee Simpson Show."
  29. The essentially two-character play has been opened up to the point that it includes a variety of settings and subordinate figures, but it never approaches anything lifelike.

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