The New York Times' Scores

For 1,461 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Live in Europe 1967: Best of the Bootleg, Vol. 1
Lowest review score: 10 All The Right Reasons
Score distribution:
1,461 music reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    These aren’t very good songs, and the band’s agenda--sounding bored and chic, simultaneous distancing and beckoning, creating revulsion and desire--seems to tilt, in the end, more toward fashion than music.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    X&Y
    When he moans his verses, Mr. Martin can sound so sorry for himself that there's hardly room to sympathize for him, and when he's not mixing metaphors, he fearlessly slings clichés.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Ms. Williams’s strong suit is going simple and direct, but “West” loses its focus and goes wide and long. It develops a grandiosity problem. [12 Feb 2007]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Libertad sounds old, heavy, wrapped in a tough skin. At the same time, by virtue of sheer outdated flamboyance, it seems almost willfully naive.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    [A] rather dreary pastiche.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A surprisingly dull album. [26 Sep 2005]
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The results are mostly dismal, making for the sort of album that reinforces faith in big, lumbering institutions that understand starmaking.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Of course it is good to be ambitious. Of course the Killers needed to update their sound, given that the 80’s revival is fading away. But their new bombast is a classic case of a young band overreaching to assert its Significance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    This is a garish, puzzling album, and it isn’t the sort of CD people pick up when they want to explain what’s great about hip-hop. [12 Oct 2006]
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The shiny new beats in "Timeless" weaken the groove that existed in songs like "Mas Que Nada," "Berimbau" and "Surfboard" even before Mr. Mendes got to them 40 years ago. [13 Feb 2006]
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    With a couple of exceptions, this is a dimly written album.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    He toggles between petulant cad ("Gone in September") and wounded child ("Save Your Goodbye"), convincing at neither. He has a grating voice, heavily nasal, with a seeming inability to wrap his lips around all of the necessary syllables, meaning that even when he's at his angriest, he sounds as if he's holding back.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Much of “The Sweet Escape” sounds forced and secondhand; it’s one thing to emulate Madonna, another to be playing catchup with Fergie. [4 Dec 2006]
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Too many of the songs feel flat, despite the stormy guitars and stormier lyrics. [27 Feb 2006]
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Most of this album is startlingly uninspired; no-frills rhymes were once this duo's main weapon; now they are its main liability. [1 May 2006]
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The overall effect of "Amarantine" is like drowning in whipped cream. [28 Nov 2005]
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The album's consistency is its downfall; Mr. Powter's chosen sound may stand out on a radio playlist, but over 10 songs it yields diminishing returns. [10 Apr 2006]
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The disc is full of ham-fisted experiments. [11 Oct 2004]
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It ranks at or near the top of vexing choices made by once-platinum artists, full of lazy, half-baked pablum that does more harm to Snoop Lion than good for others.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Infuriatingly plain. [16 May 2005]
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    He seems to be a better thinker than a writer and a better writer than a rapper. [24 Jul 2006]
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Among the many declarations on “Cocky & Confident,” the ninth album by the New Orleans rapper Juvenile, one stands out as truly preposterous.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Perhaps it was inevitable that a group like this would eventually emerge, peddling an energetic but inoffensive variant of hip-hop. But did we have any way of knowing that the results would be so unpleasant? [6 Jun 2005]
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The production is bargain bin, and lyrically, she sounds leaden.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    More than ever, the focus here is on Moby as a singer and songwriter, which is strange, because he is not very good at either job.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Mos Def may not be flossy or raw at this stage in his celebrated career, which is fine. But what he offers instead is lukewarm nostalgia and obligatory indignation. [8 Jan 2007]
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    A mystifyingly inept CD that includes some of the worst lyrics you will — or, with any luck, won’t — hear all year. [26 Mar 2007]
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    "I Am Me" has an awful lot of brooding teen-rock songs, none of which flatter Ms. Simpson's rather breathy, mannered voice. [24 Oct 2005]
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There are some sturdy tunes and hooks, but not much more: the songwriting is often bland, the singing generally charmless.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    For hard-rock ridiculousness, Nickelback is tough to beat. [3 Oct 2005]
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The songs might have been better as parodies than as imitations, although “Knockout” — a Coldplay homage backing a raunchy lyric — comes close to being both.