The New York Times' Scores

For 1,712 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 The Runners Four
Lowest review score: 10 All The Right Reasons
Score distribution:
1712 music reviews
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It captures Davis's finest working band at its apogee, straining at the limits of post-bop refinement.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At its best, it’s a howling work of black protest art on par with Amiri Baraka’s incendiary play “Dutchman,” or David Hammons’s moving decapitated hoodie “In the Hood”.... He hasn’t outrun his tendency toward clutter. He is a dense rapper, and even though he’s more at ease with the music now, he still runs the risk of suffocation.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Listeners familiar with Mr. Lang’s more obstreperous instrumental works may not recognize his style here (though a few more meditative ensemble pieces hint at it). But these choral settings, composed from 2001 to 2007, show that he has idiosyncratic but effective ideas about how to use voices.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It doesn’t leap out of speakers; it oozes and bubbles, waiting for a listener to be drawn in. As it does, the pleasures and rewards keep growing.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nearly every sound in these tracks has amorphous parameters: an indeterminate pitch, a gradual attack and decay, the sensation of being heard from a distance, or perhaps underwater.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s still something to be gleaned here, perhaps especially from the frisky pianist Ruben González and the debonair vocalists Compay Segundo and Ibrahim Ferrer, all of whom are now gone, having enjoyed twilight acclaim.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The problem with "A Grand Don't Come for Free" is that the pieces often work better as stories than as songs.... But it is still a thrill to hear Mr. Skinner toy with the form that he invented.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The 70-minute album sags by the end, and every listener will probably find one must-skip song. But Ms. Monae gets away with most of her metamorphoses, and the sheer ambition is exhilarating even when she stretches too far.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even the most elaborate constructions come across as homemade, touched with an optimism that is by no means naïve. [10 Jul 2005]
    • The New York Times
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A hushed, intent Sufjan Stevens contemplates death, grief, family and memory on his quietly moving new album.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a messy album, sometimes thrillingly so, a mélange of psychedelic rock, punk energy and R&B desperation.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the year's best indie-rock albums. [3 Oct 2004]
    • The New York Times
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ngoni Ba was already remarkable for its plucked, pointillist modal grooves, and on Jama Ko, its passionate defense of Malian culture makes the music even sharper.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With the producer John Congleton, Ms. Clark creates an unpretty backdrop for some of her most alluring melodies.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s not likely to be a more earthy feeling and backward-sounding country album released on a major label this year.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These are pummeling cyber-howls, these songs.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gorgeous... One of the year's best electronic albums. [29 May 2005]
    • The New York Times
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    These clattering and clear-eyed tracks add up to something singular. [27 Nov 2006]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    To Be Kind continues a run of evermore committed, detailed and powerful work since the band formed again with a new lineup four years ago.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It doesn’t reflect a lack of evolution, or even a regression, but rather the completion of a circle--and probably a landing pad, even as the world continues to whiz by.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are minor variations, like key changes and picking patterns, but nothing as radical as the ways he would transform the songs in later years.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    [A] rather brilliant record.... You almost want to hold the whole thing still, flatten it out and study it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s more experimental yet catchier, more introspective yet more assertive, by turns gloomier and funnier, and above all richer in both sound and implication. “Return to Cookie Mountain” is simply one of this year’s best albums.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ms. Musgraves has a sweet character to her sound, which allows her to deliver a cynic’s wisdom in the voice of an inquisitive child.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a cranky record that gets exciting entirely on its own schedule.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It feels like an event: grand, sumptuous, sometimes seductive.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is complete in itself. It's just 39 minutes, made brief to be listened to as a whole.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The low-fi yet meticulous arrangements only add to the sense of isolation and the poignancy of the songs. [18 Oct 2004]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The soukous guitars are still there, now and then, but solitary post-punk guitar lines also hang in the air, and they share a spooky, precarious soundscape that changes with each track: heaving with distorted bass, warped by the echoes and shifting reverb of a psychedelic-dub production, invaded by noise.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rhythmic layers crackle and coil, percussion spatters prettiness, and noise sometimes looms from murky corners....Radiohead has also reclaimed its tunefulness. Its new songs take care to string long-lined melodies across the rigorous counterpoint.