The New York Times' Scores

For 1,916 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Fargo: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 916
  2. Negative: 0 out of 916
916 tv reviews
  1. What could have easily become a pandering hybrid is in fact intelligent, emotionally resonant television.
  2. An extraordinary 10-part series that masters its greatest challenge: it balances the ideal of heroism with the violence and terror of battle, reflecting what is both civilized and savage about war. [7 Sept 2001, p.E1]
  3. In the fog of war movies, some events are hard to follow, a few characters are easily confused, but the series is never less than spellbinding.
  4. The Good Place proves it’s still able to surprise, while staying rooted in ideas that make it more than the sum of its twists.
  5. Mr. Burns and Ms. Novick, commendably, don't beat you over the head with the obvious lessons for those today who would legislate personal behavior; they largely let the story of Prohibition speak for itself.
  6. Now they are the last blinkered women in the bunker, hoarding designer shoes and awaiting an Evite back to the glamorous life. They don't belong there, and that's what makes them so welcome.
  7. It’s acutely intelligent, luxuriously dressed and well acted across the board. It’s also notably serious and quiet, despite the occasional beheading or session on the rack required by a tale.... [But] the emotional and psychological underpinnings of the narrative don’t resonate as strongly as its ideas about history and governance.
  8. Tthe best new half-hour of funny television in a season rife with half-hours of funny television.
  9. A succinct and well-conceived documentary.
  10. Each of Mr. Simon’s works is ultimately about systems: people of different classes, races and levels of power, whose choices (or lack thereof) define an economy and a society. That macro idea makes The Deuce smart. Its micro detail--a Studs Terkelesque catalog of the million ways to chase a hustle--makes it art. ... But man, is there a lot of setup.
  11. The story of Ned (Lee Pace), a young man who can bring the dead back to life, is sweetly odd, but also oddly charming.
  12. Masters of Sex does an elegant job of reframing their [Masters and Johnson's] strange, complicated and at times deeply cynical partnership into a twisted but intriguing love story.
  13. Like the movie, the series is peculiar, with an irregular rhythm and lots of black humor, and it is also oddly winning.
  14. In any given episode, all three of these actresses may be called upon for slapstick comedy (for Ms. Metcalf, in the season premiere, there’s an outlandish scene in a bathroom stall), deadpan humor and actual pathos, since their patients are often frail, facing dementia or outright dying. And they deliver with nuanced performances that turn quick glances or sighs into punch lines.
  15. The appeal is elementary: good, unpretentious fun, something that's in short supply around here.
  16. At times "Freaks and Geeks" tried too hard to create jolts of recognition. Here the frantic characters regularly call one another idiots, yet Undeclared always seems smart and effortless.
  17. The Knick has become much more than another tortured-genius antihero story. It has developed a sprawl reminiscent of HBO’s “Deadwood,” stretching to the mansion and the gutter with equal familiarity.... Despite the often dark outlook, there’s also a sense of awe at the analog machinery of life.
  18. Ultimately, it’s a show to be admired, not loved. Part of this may have to do with packing a complicated story with about a dozen major characters into six hours.
  19. The multitude of exegeses and theories devoted to major plot twists and minor details attest to the series’s enduring egghead appeal.
  20. On "State of Play" and Prime Suspect, ordinary men and women take center stage and hold it beautifully. [16 Apr 2004, p.E1]
    • The New York Times
  21. People eat this stuff up, and a skeptic can find himself riveted by the best of it.
  22. As it lurches to its conclusion, the politics of "Deadwood" keep growing more dense and colorful, and that magnificent obsession crowds out other primal forces.
  23. The depiction of the modern country music business in Nashville feels reasonably authentic, and when the story stays within that realm, it has the mix of hardheadedness, sentimentality and honky-tonk come-on you can get from a good country song.
  24. Lady Dynamite has its own bizarre-sincere voice and its own dream logic. It’s something else, in a good way: a journey to the center of Ms. Bamford’s mind that dives through fantasy after loopy fantasy and emerges with something real.
  25. A blistering, demented animated series.
  26. It’s arch, playful and pop literate. ... The rapid-fire jokes don’t all land, the supporting characters can be cartoonish and the satire didactic. The show’s strength is its confident, consistent voice.
  27. The Missing is imaginatively written, well cast, chillingly believable and quite addictive. This kind of story has been told this way before, but somehow that doesn’t make this telling any less compelling.
  28. Because the gently quirky celebrity documentary is an enjoyable if standardized format, the potency of Bright Lights sneaks up on you.
  29. Season 2 is in many ways as captivating and addictive as the first, but this time around, the series comes off as a shameless throwback to itself.
  30. The movie, adapted by Mr. Kramer and directed by Ryan Murphy, simultaneously exposes some of the play’s flaws and finds alternate sources of power in the story.

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