The New Yorker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,393 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Maria Full of Grace
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
1,393 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Forest Whitaker directed with a slow, sugary touch -- and, one suspects, an eye toward the home-video market.
  1. Babel is an infuriatingly well-made disaster.
  2. O.K. for children.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The supporting cast of yokels commit plenty of redneck faux pas, but the witty script is weighed down by the director David Dobkin's heavy hand.
  3. There are many scenes of mock-lucha wrestling, which become as boring as actual wrestling. Nacho Libre, naïvely made kids’ stuff, lacks such minor attributes as a decent script and supporting cast.
  4. The audience decided to sell Snakes to itself, and that became the event--the actual movie could never have been more than another exploitation picture.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For anyone who was transfixed by the first movie, watching the new one is a little like being unplugged from the Matrix: What was I experiencing all that time? Could it have been . . . all a dream? [19 May 2003, p.68]
  5. Everybody in and around this movie is trying too hard...After half an hour, we realized that, instead of enjoying a funny film, we were being lightly bullied into finding fun where precious little exists. [5 April 2004, p. 89]
    • The New Yorker
  6. Wilson and the director, Steven Shainberg, draw on Arbus's family and on many elements from her life and her art, only to turn the material into feeble nonsense.
  7. Now the mush has taken over, and Columbus has slowed his pace in nervous deference to the solemnity of his plot (not to mention the opulence of his characters' lives).
  8. In short, Dark Blue suffers from a problem that, however niggling, is likely to hobble any thriller: no thrills. [17 & 24 February 2003, p.204]
    • The New Yorker
  9. Picture my disappointment as I realized that, for all the pizzazz of Superman Returns, its global weapon of choice would not be terrorism, or nuclear piracy, or dirty bombs. It would be real estate. What does Warner Bros. have in mind for the next installment? Superman overhauls corporate pension plans? Luthor screws Medicare?
  10. The glum fact is that Gone Girl lacks clout where it needs it most, at its core.
  11. The movie is a mess, but it’s certainly not dull.
  12. In brief, I fell cheated by these clever, narrative-disrupting films. They seem to miss the point. After all, every fiction film is magical--an artifice devoted to “What if?”
  13. You should see it just for Chester — the adventurous sham, running ever deeper into a maze of his own devising.
  14. When Wright literalizes the fantastic, the movie turns squalid. He does better when he lets his visual fancies roam free. [25 April, 2011 p.88]
    • The New Yorker
  15. We're supposed to be overwhelmed by magic, but what we see is fancy film technique and a lot of strained whimsy.
  16. The movie is ungainly – you can almost see the chalk marks it's not hitting. But it has a loose, likable shabbiness. [19 Oct 1987, p.110]
    • The New Yorker
  17. The over-all effect is bizarre, daring you to be amused by something both brilliant and bristling with offense; if you sidle out at the end, feeling half guilty at what you just conspired in, then Stiller has trapped you precisely where he wants you.
  18. If only Kim had a sense of humor to match his visual wit. Instead, we get rusted gags and rubbery acting.
  19. The Lovely Bones has been fashioned as a holiday family movie about murder and grief; it’s a thoroughly queasy experience.
  20. This disposable date movie is not so much written and acted as cast—just about every young actor in the country is in it.
  21. The movie, bad as it is, will do as a demonstration of a talented man’s freedom to choose different ways of being himself.
  22. Inglourious Basterds is not boring, but it’s ridiculous and appallingly insensitive.
  23. Having delighted in the doominess of Drive, as its journey began, I ended much less joyful than repelled.
  24. The few good jokes (most of them courtesy of the Pharaoh's high priests, voiced by Martin Short and Steve Martin) are swallowed up in this humorless epic.
  25. Unconvincing and ineffective; the many patches of ideological montage, growing like kudzu throughout the film, weaken the impact of its best moments.
  26. You can’t deny the smiling mood that wafts through the film like incense, and to that extent it honors the original three days; but not once does a character’s show of feeling stir you, send you, or stop you in your tracks, and the loss is unsustainable.
  27. Kevin Smith turns out to be reverent after all: he wants to separate true love from mere copulating for money, but his story mixes romance and porn so inextricably that he seems confused, and the movie trips over its own conceits.

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