The New Yorker's Scores

For 99 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 29% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Breaking Bad: Season 5
Lowest review score: 10 Ghost Whisperer: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 50
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 50
  3. Negative: 0 out of 50
50 tv reviews
  1. Breaking Bad [is] a radical type of television, and also a very strange kind of must-watch: a show that you dread and crave at the same time.
  2. Behind the Candelabra succeeds precisely because it doesn’t care much about health or what constitutes a good role model--it shows respect for a complicated marriage simply by making it real.
  3. A gorgeously living thing.
  4. Smash does a very satisfying job of merging the pleasures of "American Idol" and commercial Broadway, placing the "hummable melody" dead center and prioritizing fun over absolute authenticity.
  5. The new episodes start well, then keep improving, with narrative clarity and a fresh visual beauty.
  6. Broadchurch is beautifully crafted: well filmed, well cast, well scored, atmospheric without being a drag. It also has a striking mixture of cruel insight and sentimental warmth that elevates it above cheaper concoctions.
  7. [Andrew Haigh & Michael Lannan] collaboration is a real beauty, the standout among several smart series launching in January.
  8. Rescue Me is a daring, unflinching show—a worthy companion to FX’s dark-hearted police drama “The Shield”—and it is unafraid to expose the not always pretty particulars of firehouse culture and the more fallible side of those we count on to save us.
  9. By the finale, Season 2 is stronger than Season 1, largely because it’s more uncompromising about its characters, at once more nuanced and more damning.
  10. It’s a daring, difficult project, a chewy story about a family from much the same privileged world as “Afternoon Delight.”
  11. [A] soaring, inventive miniseries.
  12. Rock is able to find humor in every aspect of his childhood.
  13. The meanest sitcom in years—and one of the funniest.
  14. Mad Men is smart and tremendously attractive, and it stirs you more than it probably should.
  15. McBride is comfortable improvising, and in Eastbound there’s a lot of pleasurable tension in watching Kenny create difficult situations with his poor judgment and get out of them with his escape artist’s quick brain.
  16. Men of a Certain Age is bound to attract attention, because its co-creator, and one of its co-stars, is Ray Romano; what shouldn’t be overlooked, however, is the fact that the show is also good. Surprisingly good.
  17. The result, with its strong, complex, funny, flawed central character, feels truer to life than the zillions of one-dimensional (or no-dimensional) nurses on television.
  18. Eastbound & Down holds together so well that it's worth looking past the ugly for the solid performances and the charcoal-black humor beneath, particularly in the final episodes, which delve into Powers's family history.
  19. Awake may be hard to categorize, but it's worth our attention.
  20. Episodes has a sly subversiveness that deepens over time, like mercury poisoning: it's an adult farce that is at once frothy and acerbic.
  21. This season is so much more effective that it’s practically a master class in how tweaks can transform a series--and in how hard it is to judge a sitcom early on.
  22. Smart, salty, and outrageous, the series falls squarely in the tradition of graphic adult cable drama.
  23. The dialogue isn’t always subtle, but it’s often sharp.
  24. Sondheim’s frequent collaborator James Lapine directs, and he does an excellent job of stitching together interviews from more than four decades, including ones with Mike Douglas and Diane Sawyer, to form a portrait of the composer as both a young and an old man.
  25. The show is at its best in such moments, these sequences that capture the semi-virtual, semi-real ways that we think, and feel, and meet, and connect today. It’s a rare attempt to make visible something that we take for granted: a new kind of cognition, inflected by passion, that allows strangers to think out loud, solving mysteries together.
  26. The Americans can be wrenchingly emotional, and it’s terrifically well paced. But it doesn’t take itself overly seriously, and while the show looks pretty good it’s not the most cinematic series on the block.
  27. The show is well structured, with blunt but effective sitcom beats, and, refreshingly, it isn’t an “Entourage”-tinted fantasy.
  28. It’s not that the season was bad--it was daring and often beautiful, emphasizing serial storytelling over episodic one-offs, with many indelible moments, especially those involving Louie’s daughters.
  29. The show is more than tit for tat: it’s sheer pleasure, no guilt allowed.
  30. At six episodes, Happy Valley is satisfyingly compressed.

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