The New Yorker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,362 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Fruitvale Station
Lowest review score: 0 Bio-Dome
Score distribution:
1,362 movie reviews
  1. The mélange of plots, subplots, reveries, gags, cartoons, dirty bits, and hissy fits points to a work that is structurally modelled less on the classic narratives of cinema than on, say, a portion of Russian salad.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The moral discussions operate like a bad pair of elevator shoes: it's obvious that their function is to lift black-and-white melodrama into message-movie paradise. The whole film, with its steady, important-picture pacing and its bits of pseudo-profundity, is a piece of glorified banality. [14 Dec 1992, p.123]
    • The New Yorker
  2. The self-confident fatuity and condescension of the movie is offensive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Schumacher's direction is coarse and slovenly: the picture has the self-conscious jokiness of the "Batman" TV series and the smudged, runny imagery of a cheaply printed comic book.
  3. The cast looks sound enough—John Goodman as Fred Flintstone, Elizabeth Perkins as Wilma, Rick Moranis and Rosie O'Donnell as the Rubbles—but the script, cobbled together by a crowd of writers, gives them nothing but a handful of limp gags.
  4. The whole enterprise heaves and strains with a sadistic overkill that even Dario might find too rich.
  5. Though the film is not as criminally poor as "V for Vendetta," which the Wachowskis wrote in 2005, it struck me as more insidious.
  6. To be honest, I would be perfectly happy to walk with a zombie after ninety minutes of this; it would feel like light relief.
  7. The problem is that Snyder, following Moore, is so insanely aroused by the look of vengeance, and by the stylized application of physical power, that the film ends up twice as fascistic as the forces it wishes to lampoon.
  8. The Book of Eli combines the maximum in hollow piety with remorseless violence. [18 Jan. 2010, p.82]
    • The New Yorker
  9. The plot becomes disastrously condescending: the black man, who's crude, sexy, and a great dancer, liberates the frozen white man. The handsome Omar Sy jumps all over the place, and he's blunt and grating. Francois Cluzet acts with his eyebrows, his nose, his forehead. It's an admirable performance, but the movie is an embarrassment. [28 May 2012, p.78]
    • The New Yorker
  10. The story, devised by David Benioff and Skip Woods, is largely meaningless, and the emotions are no more than functional—they set up the next fight.
  11. The movie is exhausting, utterly without feeling, and pointless -- though Smith looks great in his Western outfit.
  12. I found Tourist hell to sit through. [23 Jan 1989]
    • The New Yorker
    • 61 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    The movie is a peculiarly irritating failure -- a leaden piece of uplift.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    A vicious, grindingly manipulative urban mystery that uses a thick atmosphere of S & M kinkiness to distract the audience from the story's thinness and inanity.
  13. In the end, Dreamcatcher is an abominable-worm picture. The movie is also an unholy mess, a miserably organized and redundant collection of arbitrary scares and thrills without a unifying visual or poetic idea. [31 March 2003, p. 106]
    • The New Yorker
  14. The director is Bob Spiers, though it's hard to judge whether he actually turned up on the set.
  15. What Lars von Trier has achieved is avant-gardism for idiots. From beginning to end, Dogville is obtuse and dislikable, a whimsical joke wearing cement shoes. [29 March 2004, p. 103]
    • The New Yorker
  16. The general opinion of Revenge of the Sith seems to be that it marks a distinct improvement on the last two episodes, "The Phantom Menace" and "Attack of the Clones." True, but only in the same way that dying from natural causes is preferable to crucifixion.
  17. But by the end, the charm and delicacy of the 1961 cartoon have long been replaced by laborious gross-outs. Is this now official Disney policy?
    • 22 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    The director, Frank Marshall, who has produced films for Steven Spielberg, gets his own Michael Crichton book to play with—and the results are disastrous.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    In this smutty kiddie farce he's a clownish action toy, and he grows wearying, fast.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    It's a dull, poky picture, which provides an unwelcome showcase for MacLaine's increasingly insufferable cute-gorgon shtick and no showcase at all for Cage's tremendous comic talents.
  18. The funniest thing about The Women is that Mick Jagger is one of the producers.
  19. Madonna's mess of a movie grabs at the rub and rancor of multiculturalism, which it proceeds to squash into a litter of clichés, or, more simply, insults.
  20. The Expendables is savage yet inert, and breathtakingly sleazy in its lack of imagination.
  21. Has so many things wrong with it that one can only stare at the screen in disbelief. [25 April, 2011 p. 89]
    • The New Yorker
  22. So lazy is the characterization, so hamstrung the plot, and so chronically broad the overacting that the main interest lies in deciding which to block first, your eyes or your ears. [2 Sept. 2013, p.81]
    • The New Yorker
    • 1 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    The sheer ineptitude of the movie is supposed to be funny, but there's no lunacy behind it: Shore and his writers are like comedians on Prozac, smiling through the fart jokes without a hint of desperation.

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