The New Yorker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,354 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Footnote
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
1,354 movie reviews
    • 37 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    In this smutty kiddie farce he's a clownish action toy, and he grows wearying, fast.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Although it's refreshing to see an action movie that doesn't pretend to be something it isn't, this frankness has a downside, because what the picture so unapologetically is isn't, in fact, much.
  1. Though the film is not as criminally poor as "V for Vendetta," which the Wachowskis wrote in 2005, it struck me as more insidious.
  2. Has so many things wrong with it that one can only stare at the screen in disbelief. [25 April, 2011 p. 89]
    • The New Yorker
  3. The movie is hectic, exhausting, and baffling. It's an embarrassment.
  4. The movie is hardly in a position to chastise Gage for his empty soul when its own style is one of numbing, desolate slickness.
  5. The result is more or less a remake of the great scene in “Sherlock Jr.,” where a dozing Buster Keaton dreams himself through a shuffled sequence of backgrounds. Jumper is ten times as brutal, maybe a thousand times more costly, and eighty-four years late, but it’s a start.
  6. The movie rages on for a hundred and fifty minutes and then just stops, pausing for the next sequel.
  7. In the end, Dreamcatcher is an abominable-worm picture. The movie is also an unholy mess, a miserably organized and redundant collection of arbitrary scares and thrills without a unifying visual or poetic idea. [31 March 2003, p. 106]
    • The New Yorker
  8. To be honest, I would be perfectly happy to walk with a zombie after ninety minutes of this; it would feel like light relief.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    54
    Mike Myers plays Steve Rubell as the druggy epicenter of Studio 54, and his performance gives director Mark Christopher's soapy morality tale its only moments of wanton, hedonistic spirit.
  9. The director is Bob Spiers, though it's hard to judge whether he actually turned up on the set.
  10. This is the first occasion on which Moodysson has lost his balance, allowing his wrath to outweigh the charity that he used to extend to even the most boorish of his characters.
  11. Reese Witherspoon is a woman, aged thirty-five, with a bundle of grownup roles behind her. Yet in order to retain her slot in romantic comedy, it appears, she must reverse into her teens. What makes the transition yet more depressing is the memory of Tracy Flick. [27 Feb. 2012, p.86]
    • The New Yorker
  12. The self-confident fatuity and condescension of the movie is offensive.
  13. One of those hyper-articulate messes which inspire awe and a kind of nauseated pity. [3 March 2003, p. 94]
    • The New Yorker
  14. Falls below even minimal standards of dramatic decency. John Q is a trashy, opportunistic piece of pop demagoguery. [4 Mar 2002, p. 90]
    • The New Yorker
  15. Although Premonition is not a frightening movie, it is aimed squarely at an audience of frightened souls.
  16. The movie is all whoosh and whack and abrupt closeups -- jerky digital punctuation. It's alienating experience, without emotional resonance or charm. [28 March 2011, p. 116]
    • The New Yorker
  17. Pfeiffer, enormously likable in the role, almost saves the movie. [28 Jan 2002, p. 90]
    • The New Yorker
  18. The mélange of plots, subplots, reveries, gags, cartoons, dirty bits, and hissy fits points to a work that is structurally modelled less on the classic narratives of cinema than on, say, a portion of Russian salad.
  19. What it's really about, of course, is the very delicate marketing problem of turning a super-bland pop star into an acceptable human being onscreen. [4 Mar 2002, p. 90]
    • The New Yorker
  20. Carrey, unable to pretzel himself in this role, has to do a normal job of characterization, but he never fills in the blank spaces in Peter Appleton. [28 Jan 2002, p. 90]
    • The New Yorker
  21. The whole enterprise heaves and strains with a sadistic overkill that even Dario might find too rich.
  22. The funniest thing about The Women is that Mick Jagger is one of the producers.
  23. Madonna's mess of a movie grabs at the rub and rancor of multiculturalism, which it proceeds to squash into a litter of clichés, or, more simply, insults.
  24. This shameless piece of sentimentality is indignantly on the side of feelings and spontaneity and against coldhearted technique, as if those were the only two choices in training doctors.
  25. The only thing that Butler and Aniston have in common, however, is identical Aruba-bronze skin tones: they seem to have been sprayed with the same can.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    The director, Frank Marshall, who has produced films for Steven Spielberg, gets his own Michael Crichton book to play with—and the results are disastrous.
  26. Compare 88 Minutes with "Sea of Love," another murder mystery that Pacino made, in 1989, and you find him sporting the same loud ties, but everything else has leached away: suspense, credibility, wit, and the lost art of flirtation.

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